Man Utd vs Man City Live Stream Watch the Premier League online

first_img We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editor Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Man Utd vs Man City: Where to live stream the Premier League this WednesdayMan City take the short trip across the city to Old Trafford this evening to face a Man Utd side with a bit of a dilemma.  A win would keep the Red Devils in the race for the top four, but would also give arch-rivals Liverpool a massive boost in their race for their first ever Premier League title. Our quick guide reveals all you need to know to watch Man Utd vs Man City online, including full live stream details and the kick-off time.Unfortunately for Ole Gunnar Solksjaer, victory looks beyond his team. Man Utd have lost five games in a row in all competitions, the latest a humiliating 4-0 defeat at the hands of Everton on Sunday. Simply put, they’ve been awful.Read more: Eleven SportsMan City, on the other hand, keep doing what they do best, winning 11 of their last 12 games. On paper, tonight’s game represent City’s final major Premier League test of the season, but based on current form, it could easily be a hammering.Sergio Aguero, Bernardo Silva, Raheem Sterling, Leroy Sane, David Silva, Riyad Mahrez, meet Chris Smalling. And Ashley Young. Play nice. Solksjaer will be praying that David de Gea’s managed to get his mojo back after that gaffe in Barcelona last Tuesday.However, the smallest sliver of hope remains for Man Utd fans, Liverpool fans, and neutrals. Cast your mind back to April 7 2018, when the Red Devils, inspired by Paul Pogba, managed to overturn a 2-0 half-time deficit to beat the Sky Blues 3-2 on their own turf, delaying what would have been raucous title celebrations − by a week − in the process.The big difference this time around is that Man City went into Manchester derby off the back of a chastening result at the hands of Liverpool (the first leg of their Champions League quarter final clash), and Man Utd were actually on a decent run.Whichever side you’re on, it’s a huge game, and streaming it could barely be easier. Here’s how to do it.Man Utd vs Man City Live Stream: Kick-off time and how to watchThe game is scheduled to kick off at 8pm BST on Wednesday, April 24, and the match will be shown on TV on both Sky Sports Premier League and Sky Sports Main Event. The build-up starts at 7pm.Sky subscribers will be able to watch it on nearly any device for no additional cost – be it a smartphone, tablet, PC, or laptop – via the Sky Go app.Non-Sky customers can watch it for a nominal fee, either by signing up for a Sky Sports Mobile TV subscription, or by buying a NOW TV pass from just £7.99.Here are some handy links to get you started:Buy a NOW TV Sky Sports pass from just £7.99Download Sky GoSign up for Sky Sports Mobile TVAll that’s left to do is cart in the prawn sandwiches, sit back, and enjoy what will hopefully not be a whitewash be an extremely entertaining affair.Share your predictions for Man Utd vs Man City by tweeting us @TrustedReviews.last_img read more

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OnePlus 7 Pro has an awesome feature we pray appears on the

first_imgiPhone 11 OnePlus has thrown down the gauntlet when it comes to screen performance, leaving other brands playing catch-up. Here are the details.The OnePlus 7 Pro screen features an astonishing 90Hz refresh rate. Hertz (Hz) is a measure of frequency, so in this context the screen updates itself 90 times per second. This should result in a very smooth user experience, which is especially valuable when it comes to playing demanding games where every split-second counts. In this respect at least, the OnePlus 7 Pro strives to live up to its tagline: “Go Beyond Speed”.Related: Best PhonesWhile impressive, the market leading mobile refresh rate of 120Hz is currently only found on the Razer Phone 2. Some dedicated gaming PC monitors can even offer 240Hz. The OnePlus 7 Pro will lead with the 90Hz refresh rate when there is content that supports it (including its own Oxygen operating system). There is also the option to set the frame rate at 60Hz which will force all content to play at this refresh rate. It’s recommended to switch this on when you need to save some battery.Keen to find out more? Check out our OnePlus 7 Pro reviewWe’ve yet to see exactly what effect a more demanding refresh rate has on the 4000 mAh battery, but with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 and up to 12GB RAM it looks like the performance specs should be able to support this leap in speed. The screen itself is a 6.67-inch AMOLED, with a dazzling Quad HD+ resolution.Another display improvement coming to the new device is Night Mode 2.0, an option which filters out distressing blue light and is capable of displaying just 0.27 nits brightness. This feature is likely to be welcomed by users, just as Android Q‘s recently-announced Dark Theme has received a warm reception. The advantages include lower power consumption, and a more comfortable viewing experience in dark or low light.Do you want a 90Hz refresh rate to come to the iPhone 11? Let us know on Twitter: @TrustedReviews Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy.center_img This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more

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Postmedia posts net loss of 51 million as digital revenue growth streak

first_img Facebook ← Previous Next → Sponsored By: Postmedia Network Inc. President and CEO Andrew MacLeodPeter J Thompson/National Post Recommended For YouYields fall on weak housing, U.S.-China trade concernsIMF sees dangers from trade tensions, overvalued dollarGerman finmin: Libra cryptocurrency must wait for regulatory clarityCanadian inflation dips to 2.0% in June, hitting central bank targetJapan to reject South Korea’s request for meeting on export curbs – Kyodo Comment Postmedia posts net loss of $5.1 million as digital revenue growth streak continues Digital revenues up 10.2% in ninth consecutive quarter of double-digit growth Email Victor Ferreira That’s been hard to do while competing with juggernauts such as Facebook Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google for digital revenue. “You’re going up against these two players on a global scale that literally own 70-80 per cent of the market,” he said. “Every day before you wake up, most budgets have already been pre-allocated to these two platforms.”The federal government’s plan to invest $595 million in local journalism should assist Postmedia in continuing to make its transition from relying on print revenue streams to those in the digital realm. Postmedia and other Canadian media companies will be eligible for tax credits that are tied to the salaries of the journalists they employ. Because the credit is tied to jobs, MacLeod said it may force companies to think long and hard about future layoffs.He also sees the new cash as a revenue stream that will help the company “play offence” and steer it towards growth — something he said Postmedia can focus on even as it pays off millions of dollars in debt. The company paid off another $20.4 million in debt, as well an additional $5.5 million subsequent to the quarter’s end, bringing the total it owes in first-lien notes down to $99.7 million.While releasing its results on Thursday, Postmedia also announced that MacLeod has been appointed to the boards of directors of both the company and its subsidiary. The company also appointed Mary Anne Lavallee to the role of executive vice-president and chief operating officer. Lavallee joined Postmedia in 2014 and had been working as its senior vice-president of reader sales and commercial operations.• Email: vferreira@nationalpost.com | Twitter: Share this storyPostmedia posts net loss of $5.1 million as digital revenue growth streak continues Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn More Postmedia Network Canada Corp. posted its ninth consecutive quarter of double-digit digital revenue growth on Thursday, but declining print revenues and an impairment charge contributed to a net loss of $5.1 million for the company’s fiscal second quarter.In the three months ending Feb. 28, 2019, Postmedia, which is Canada’s largest newspaper chain, saw its revenue decline to $145.7 million from $157.6 million in the same period last year.The drop in the Postmedia second fiscal quarter, the company said, was due to a $10 million decrease in print advertising and a $2.9 million decline in print circulation revenue. The company noted, however, that the rates of decline for both metrics slowed as compared to last year.Overall, the company’s net loss increased from the same period in 2018, when it posted a $1.3 million loss. Postmedia attributed the difference to an impairment charge and a tax credit recovery in the second quarter of 2018 being offset by gains it made through selling property and equipment.Digital revenues, however continued to grow and were up 10.2 per cent to $28.18 million in comparison to $26.37 million in the same period last year.“We’ve clipped our debt by $125 million, we’ve got nine quarters of (digital) growth and we’ve seen improvements in the rates of decline,” said Andrew MacLeod, Postmedia’s president and chief executive. Despite the progress, MacLeod said he had no illusions about the challenges facing the company and the industry.“No one is sitting here on the executive floor and cracking open champagne and feeling great about life,” MacLeod said. ”There’s a heck of a lot of work in front of us and we know that.”MacLeod, who took over as Postmedia CEO from Paul Godfrey in January, said that the main challenge is to grow digital revenue, not just incrementally, but to the point where it surpasses what the company is earning in both print advertising and print circulation — a combined $110.7 million in the second quarter. This has to be accomplished, MacLeod said, while slowing the erosion of legacy revenues.We’ve clipped our debt by $125 million Featured Stories Reddit 7 Comments Twitter April 11, 20196:53 PM EDT Filed under News Join the conversation → What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation advertisementlast_img read more

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Fully Charged Visits Engie VehicleToGrid Pilot Project Video

first_img CharIN: CCS Combo Standard To Offer V2G By 2025 Nuvve Announces Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) Pilot Programs Engie seeks how to make V2G cheap and profitableIn one of the latest episodes of Fully Charged, Robert Llewellyn checked out the Vehicle-To-Grid (v2G) system installed by Engie at its head office outside Amsterdam in the Netherlands.French electric utility company seeks how to implement bi-directional charging with energy storage and solar installations at the lowest possible costs. Ability to use electricity from cars could be profitable for peak shaving (of electricity demand) or handy in case of emergency, but we are not there yet.V2G news Source: Electric Vehicle News In case of demo installation, Engie uses CHAdeMO chargers and Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV (other CHAdeMO-compatible cars also can be connected). As of today, CCS is not yet ready for bi-directional charging, which probably will be a major obstacle in commercialization. Honda Launches Wireless V2G With WiTricity Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 2, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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First Leaked Images Of Peugeot e208 Electric Car Slip Out

first_imgElectric Peugeot 208 coming soon.French media obtained leaked images of the upcoming all-electric Peugeot e208, which is expected to be unveiled at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show.The Peugeot e208 reportedly will share powertrain and batteries with DS 3 Crossback E-Tense (scheduled for arrival in the second half of 2019). The 50 kWh battery should be enough for up to 300 km (186 miles) of range under the WLTP test cycle.PSA news As we’ve hinted at recently, the 2019 Geneva Motor Show will certainly be the single largest electric car debut venue the world has ever seen. We sure are excited for this shift change from gas/diesel debuts to vehicles with plugs. As the public venture out to the show in Geneva, it will be immediately obvious that the focus in on electric. Stay tuned as there’s so much more electrifying info to come in the lead up to the show.Please feel free to leave a comment on the looks of the e208 and interior of the new electric car.Here are the images:Peugeot e208 (Source: automobile-propre.com) Opel/Vauxhall Teases All-New Corsa: EV Version Coming Nuevo PEUGEOT 2 0 8 . #peugeot208 #new208 #208 #clubpeugeotrd #peugeotrepublicadominicana #newsA post shared by Club Peugeot RD (@clubpeugeotrd) on Feb 21, 2019 at 6:39pm PST 508 Peugeot Sport Engineered PHEV Concept Revealed Source: automobile-propre.com, leblogauto.com, auto-motor-und-sport.de Source: Electric Vehicle News View this post on Instagram Peugeot e208 (Source: automobile-propre.com) DS 3 Crossback Electric CUV Comes Packing 50-kWh Battery Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 23, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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Watch Tesla Model 3 Performance Hit 153 MPH Video

first_img Watch Tesla Model 3 Race Corvette Z06 & Dodge Challenger: Video Top speed secured.The Tesla Model 3, especially the Performance variant, is highly capable of running at high speeds. It’s more known for its off-the-line acceleration, but it’s a capable flat-out car too.More Model 3 News Go Green In A Tesla Model 3 For St. Patrick’s Day Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 17, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Now that the Model 3 is becoming increasingly common in Europe, we get chances to see how it performs on the unlimited speed sections of the Autobahn and that’s precisely what’s captured here.Watch this impressive acceleration run in a Tesla Model 3 Performance. It hits 153 MPH on the Autobahn and remains super steady. That’s very impressive for a midsize family sedan that’s not really built for ultimate speed.Video description:TESLA MODEL 3 PERFORMANCE 0-247km/h ACCELERATION & TOP SPEED by AutoTopNLAuto-Top is an honest and pure car filming and testing company. We’re not interested in eco & green (unless it’s like, really superfast). Screaming exhausts, whining superchargers and blowing turbo’s is what we want to hear!We review all sorts of performance cars. In the different playlists you can enjoy exhaust sounds, acceleration tests (0-100, 0-200) with launch control, onboard cams and the revving sound of each car.Exotic cars, hot hatches, power sedans. We have it all! Source: Electric Vehicle News New Tesla Electric Pickup Render Is Bold, Reminds Us Of Ram Trucklast_img read more

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Owners set to strengthen grip on Liverpool as deal stays alive

first_imgTue 22 Jan 2008 21.26 EST Share on Messenger Share on Twitter Liverpool Share on WhatsApp news Soccer Share on LinkedIn Share on Twitter Share via Email Shares00 Reuse this content First published on Tue 22 Jan 2008 21.26 EST David Conn This article is more than 11 years old Soccer Share via Email Tom Hicks and George Gillett’s hold on Liverpool appeared to be strengthening last night despite supporters’ protests and rumours that the American owners’ refinancing deal had stalled. Sources close to the negotiations for a £350m loan Hicks and Gillett are seeking from the Royal Bank of Scotland and the US Bank Wachovia insisted yesterday that the deal is due to be signed this week, with Hicks hoping to announce its completion tomorrow.Stories circulated yesterday that following Monday’s stock market crash RBS had asked Hicks and Gillett to increase the amount in guarantees they are personally giving to support the new borrowing, and that the new demands were causing them problems.However, sources at both Liverpool and in the City maintained that those details have already been agreed, and that arrangements are holding firm despite the turmoil of the last fortnight. Hicks and Gillett are indeed understood to have increased their guarantees in recent weeks from £30m each to around £55m.The pair borrowed the £185m to buy Liverpool last February and were lent a further £113m by the Royal Bank of Scotland for 12 months, to absorb the club’s debts, sign players and finance initial work on the club’s new stadium. They are seeking to refinance that total loan of £298m, and with interest and further work required on the stadium the new loan is understood to amount to around £350m.The two co-owners are understood to have agreed to contribute £40m in cash between them, as well as the personal guarantees and letters of credit.At Anfield, fans have turned against Hicks and Gillett following Hicks’s admission that they talked to Jürgen Klinsmann about the manager’s job should their relationship with Rafael Benítez collapse.Dubai International Capital, the private equity group largely investing the fortune of Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum, the hereditary ruler of Dubai, then re-emerged as a potential buyer for the club, but have been adamant they will not hand a huge profit to Hicks and Gillett.There has been speculation that the pair have fallen out and Gillett might combine with DIC to buy out Hicks, but Hicks himself has insisted all along that he sees Liverpool as a long-term investment, and that he has no intention of selling now. This article is more than 11 years old Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Pinterest Owners set to strengthen grip on Liverpool as deal stays alive Topics George Gillett and Tom Hicks remain at loggerheads over the future of Liverpool. Photograph: Jason Cairnduff/Action Imageslast_img read more

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Agbonlahor gives Capello extra forward dimension

first_img Share on Twitter ‘Ancient rivalry’?I rather think not. Stop peddling the myth please.Downing was MOTM in my opinion, he was dynamic on the elft side of the pitch, defending strongly, linking with Bridge, Barry and the forward line perfectly. His crosses into the box were always going to be interesting, given the relative heights of his targets vs the German defenders, and I think he did the right thing by either playing it the near post or whizzing it in low. Above all else though – 2 assists. Job done.I thought Carrick and Barry did well, but there was a certain lack of mobility in central areas that could have been exposed by a better team. Though of course it is possible that they only played in that manner as a result of the way the Germans played, so it’s probably unfair to criticise.SWP is obviously brimming with confidence at the moment, and I almost felt sorry for the German defenders – being 6ft 6 and playing against little nippy buggers cannot be fun!Johnson did ok, but I really hope someone comes through at RB for us, because I think he is our weakest pointAggie, Bent and Defoe all did themselves proud with their effort, and it’s a shame the keeper got a hand to that ball as Bent went past him – it knocked it slightly further away than it otherwise would’ve gone and completely threw his balanceUpson was good, but he was up against the kind of striker he likes – big and strong, as opposed to fast and skilfull. If you think about the confusion Marin and Schweinsteiger caused in the second half on occasion, you can see that Terry and Upson could struggle against other teams. By the way, I thought Marin looked like an outstanding prospect. 20 Nov 2008 16:59 An enjoyable friendly, which England controlled with a dominant midfield and supporting pace. I thought England actually kept possesion very well in the first half and forced the Germans to up their tempo in the second. Carrick, Downing, Upson, Gabbie and Johnson all had very good games and all possess attributes the First Team lack – all very positive.Only complaint the one eyed commentry from the chap from ITV was just rediculous but fair play for David Pleat for trying to get him to look at the game objectively. OuLiPo Share on Twitter Clearly the Germans will never get back to their best until they get some proper German first names: Kurt, Wolfgang, Helmut, that sort of thing. Nowadays they’re all called things like Tim, Kevin and Oliver. Reply Per Mertesacker and Gabriel Agbonlahor challenge each other for the ball. Photograph: Phil Cole/Getty Images Share on Twitter 0 1 | Pick Twitter Twitter Since you’re here… first…to say well done fabio for givin them young-uns a chance to show their wares.turned out to be a good spectacle to boot. Reply Twitter Share Comments 94 View more comments Germany Share Report unthreaded Share via Email Twitter Reply Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp | Pick Share on Facebook comments (94)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Share on Pinterest Reply Share … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Gazz….Give me a break mate, I`m on your side. Reply Report 100 20 Nov 2008 19:34 Threads collapsed Reuse this content,View all comments > Share on Twitter Share on Facebook 0 1 Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Report blogposts 20 Nov 2008 18:51 Facebook Share on Facebook 0 1 Share on Twitter Share Sportblog 20 Nov 2008 18:19 20 Nov 2008 19:37 Twitter Share on Twitter | Pick Share on WhatsApp Report Report Share on Facebook Reply 0 1 Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Facebook Report | Pick Share on Facebook Facebook Topics Reply this feels like it was written before the game – agbonlahor was fine but there were better performers on the night: SWP, Johnston, Downing and Upson just for 4.Maybe after this display the moaning downers who are always saying how the prem league is ruining English talent will think again, There’s not many countries could put out two such decent teams or have such a great group of back up players. germany don’t have that sort of depth as last night showed.credit to capello for finally laying to rest the other muppet notion that failure has always been the fault of the players – Capello unlike other english coaches is the real deal and the players are responding great.As for terry he’s a great leader – the post match iinterview where he took full responsability so as to take pressure off Carson was typical, as was his goal after making a mistake ( because he was partially to blame as was carson) and the way he took the goal.he is slowly returning to the athleticism that marked chelsea’s double years . he’s had a lot of back operations and its certainly cut into his flexibility but it looks like he’s slowly getting it back.you can tell that because he’s started scoring goals from corners again, something which disappeared for a while.overall a great performance. 20 Nov 2008 17:54 Share Share Facebook marsman 0 1 | Pick Wed 19 Nov 2008 19.01 EST Reason (optional) cfcgazz Report Share on Twitter shedendexile “the latest graduate from what is looking like an unusually promising under-21 generation”Oh For The Sake of Fk. Did nobody else notice Williams’ attempt to foist another Golden Generation on us?I’m afraid Agbonlahor looks nothing at all like an international player to me, beyond making Theo Walcott look slow. He’s 22 now, that isn’t young any more. He doesn’t have that special awareness, control and vision of a top player, but he would be a very effective last 10 minutes man. He’ll never make it off the bench. Gelatinephoenix Twitter | Pick Twitter CollateralCustard Show 25 Share on Facebook 20 Nov 2008 17:48 | Pick 20 Nov 2008 17:36 shedendexile Share on LinkedIn cellardoor Facebook Shares00 Twitter Share via Email BrazilBranch briggstom1984 Reply buddha9 Reply Share on Twitter Share Twitter Facebook Reply Share on Twitter 0 1 Deyna | Pick Share on Twitter 0 1 First published on Wed 19 Nov 2008 19.01 EST 25 Share Reply Share on Twitter Share Twitter | Pick Report Facebook 20 Nov 2008 19:27 respek to the england..i enjoyed the game. Interesting point about the German defence dropping deep to counteract the pace of GA. Of course, Rooney would have a field day against a deep defence; yet if they push up to mark him, Agbonlahor will be able to get in behind.Both players would in turn create space for our increasingly pacey set of wingers. They can’t all be marked closely.I’m not doing Heskey down, by the way, but he is growing ever more injury prone – it’s nice to have an apparent alternative to partner Rooney and now, more than any time recently, we seem to have a squad full of players who are being used properly and who will actually cause teams problems.We’re far from perfect but at least I’m actually looking forward to seeing England play again. That’s genuinely all I really want. Share on Facebook Share 1 20 Nov 2008 16:51 Share on Twitter England actually passed the ball and retained possession in midfield rather than attempting 30 yard raking balls every 3 minutes a la Gerrard & co. Carrick and Barry looked far more balanced in the centre than Gerrard or Lampard ever have. Hopefully the first team players can learn from this example and continue to note that at international level often times less is more. oldest shedendexile Twitter Share on Facebook | Pick i thought Carrick had a blinder last night. Very rarely giving the ball away and clearing everything up.Bridge also is highly underrated – never seems to let the team down whenever he plays and overlaps neatly.All-in-all a good second string performance against a good second string side. And to do it all Berlin too, where they’ve not been beaten since the 70s. fair play indeed.Just one thing…Terry ‘heroically’ stepping up to shoulder the blame??? er…no. it was his fault. He had bags of time to hoof it away, as he should have done. No questions. 3 | Pick 0 1 Report Report Share 20 Nov 2008 19:46 A sudden onset of the collywobbles midway through the second half was not allowed to diminish the satisfaction of England’s competent victory over Germany last night, and in particular the sustained excellence of the performance with which the 22-year-old Gabriel Agbonlahor announced himself as an international player. Apart from the result, which will look even better on Fabio Capello’s CV, that was the night’s big gain. England now have another worthwhile strike forward lining up in the queue behind Wayne Rooney, Theo Walcott and Emile Heskey.”Thank you for inventing the beautiful game,” said a large and almost unnervingly courteous banner strung out between the two vast tiers of seats and facing the dug-outs in Berlin’s showpiece stadium. The visitors, to whom it was addressed, obliged the old enemy by playing the more progressive and entertaining football, even if accuracy was sometimes lacking from a team containing, as a result of all those high-profile withdrawals, an unusually high number of players with reputations to make.None of them began the match accompanied by a greater sense of anticipation than Agbonlahor, a Premier League debutant only 2½ years ago and an integral part of Martin O’Neill’s new Aston Villa for the past couple of seasons. Called into Capello’s first squad last February, but forced to stand down with a last-minute hamstring injury, he was an unused substitute in the summer tour games against the United States and Trindad & Tobago. Now, in the absence of those three, his chance had come.The circumstances could hardly have been more helpful: a great stadium, almost full for the latest episode of this ancient rivalry, but in competitive terms a fairly relaxed occasion; and in opposition a team with plenty of problems of their own. They were as bad last night as they were under Erich Ribbeck in Euro 2000, when England – managed by Kevin Keegan – beat them for the first time since 1966, and that is saying something. Their crowd jeered them off at half-time and responded to the team’s attempt to salute them after the final whistle with a display of absolute contempt. Even their equaliser was handed to them by a ludicrous misunderstanding at the heart of the England defence.The match was not 80 seconds old when Agbonlahor appeared to have created the perfect opening for Jermain Defoe. Taking a position to the left of his striking partner, he played a neat through-pass to put the Portsmouth player in on the home goalkeeper, Rene Adler. The lack of conviction in the finish was only partially obscured by a marginal offside decision against Defoe. Here was immediate encouragement for those who see in Agbonlahor a combination of pace, awareness and confidence that could turn out to be just the ticket at international level.For others, notably the wingers Shaun Wright-Phillips and Stewart Downing, this match represented an opportunity to resurrect international careers that have consistently refused to catch fire. Downing, so abject against Andorra in September, was more enterprising last night, making the most of an early rebound off Arne Friedrich to loop a dangerous ball across the German penalty area and then chipping a fine reverse pass for Agbonlahor to chase, a pursuit that ended when the referee, Massimo Busacca of Switzerland, blew for a shoulder-to-shoulder challenge with Adler that would surely have gone unremarked had it not been committed on a member of a protected species.Wright-Phillips hit the post with a marvellous 20-yard drive in the closing minutes but almost everything else he did was marked by the imprecision that has plagued his England performances – and many of those when he was at Chelsea as well, suggesting that it may be the result of a form of stage fright. He was easily dispossessed, his inswinging left-wing corners travelled no further than the first defender and even his short passes usually found an opponent’s feet.But there was enough before half-time to please Capello, even if it came against a Germany at times grinding to a bemused halt. The opening goal was not a thing of beauty, Adler flapping uselessly at Downing’s right-wing corner and the ball rebounding off Agbonlahor before Matthew Upson prodded it home, but at least the England players were in the right positions and acted before their adversaries had time to respond.While not producing the sort of fireworks now routinely expected from the absent Walcott, Agbonlahor – the latest graduate from what is looking like an unusually promising under-21 generation – did nothing that betrayed a sense of unease. His positioning off Defoe in the first half and Darren Bent in the second was sensible and his interventions were always constructive.Capello’s reversion to a prosaic 4-4-2 did not particularly help the Villa man’s cause. Germany’s back line defended deep whenever danger threatened, and England lacked the quality of passing from midfield to embarrass the white-shirted centre backs.Despite the lack of opportunities to demonstrate his lacerating speed by running into the spaces behind the defence, Agbonlahor was at least using the occasion, particularly with a cute glancing header across the area to Wayne Bridge’s low centre, to make himself appear at home. Capello, who must have been rendered incandescent by the mix-up between John Terry and Scott Carson which created Germany’s equaliser, will have been as pleased with Agbonlahor’s overall display as with Terry’s success in making amends. Report Facebook Twitter Gelatine….Marin looked like something we just havn`t got….Walcott if he wasn`t just a good drug-free bet in the 100m in the next olympics, but could actually get past (or even try to get past a defender).Oul.Po….As someone who spent 5 long years in Germany (including Euro 96), I am hoping for a whole team of “Tims”, hopefully with the teutonic equivalent of wonky knees and a stiff upper-lipped determination never to win anything. Ever.I would swop a mound of strawberry-stained earth in SW 19 for that, I really would.I am from Wimbledon. sarkmah Reply Agbonlawho?! 20 Nov 2008 19:13 20 Nov 2008 19:23 collapsed 2 Reply Share on Facebook Share Close report comment form 20 Nov 2008 19:05 Share on Facebook Shed: We haven’t got at the moment, but from looking at the U21s and U19s, I’d wager that won’t be the case for very longMore to the point, though it would be nice if we did, I don’t necessarily think we need a player of that mould. Provided we play to our strengths, we have enough about us to compete, and we always have. What has been lacking, and what Fabio appears to offer, is the ability to produce a team. Where positive individual performances contribute to the collective, rather than solely to the individual’s reputation. I’m not saying we’re the best team in the world and destined to win the World Cup, but I would argue that under Capello we will finally get to watch more good England performances than bad. Share on Twitter Reply ‘Practise’ ‘defense’??What is going on, it is spelt with a ‘c’ ffs. If you;re gonig to comment on an English papers board, at least do it in English. Share on Facebook Report Share 20 Nov 2008 13:17 Report Twitter Facebook Share on Facebook 0 1 this match represented an opportunity to resurrect international careers that have consistently refused to catch fireWhat a lovely mixed metaphor! Just as well these career corpses didn’t catch fire, or else they’d be merely ashes by now. Reply 0 1 Reply Facebook Share Twitter 0 1 Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Gelatinephoenix Facebook It was suprisingly a fairly good game.I was very suprised by Downing – he’s been terrible at international level but really played well.SWP was poor i thought – the two things he did were get a booking for a very funny challenge and hit the post – he really can’t cross the ball at all.Carrick and Barry were solid in the middle – but didn’t really create much of note – there was no real drive from central midfield to get into the box or to push up.Gabby was good – although when he did get a chance to break he should’ve continued his run and taken on the defenders instead of being unselfish and looking for SWP.Also – was anyone else confused as to why Upson was MOM? as he was ok – nothing special – but MOM? no way. | Pick 4 Facebook All Facebook Soccer 0 1 1 Twitter 0 1 Report 20 Nov 2008 18:15 Twitter Stop bothering with analysis, and get a grip….Even Steve McQueen would have beaten that German defense. Confident, aware and fast on his debut, Gabriel Agbonlahor looked just the ticket at international level Facebook | Pick Twitter This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Arsh Report Facebook Ha Ha Ha cfcgazz spelt going wrong and put a semi-colon in place of an apostrophe. What a jerk. 0 1 Share on Facebook Facebook 0 1 0 1 Share on Facebook Report shedendexile | Pick Reply stealthbanana Share 0 1 Twitter | Pick 2 Share on Facebook 3 Share Reply Reply Share on Twitter Reply Facebook Twitter 20 Nov 2008 19:15 Share on Facebook Report newest Share Share on Twitter 20 Nov 2008 19:35 | Pick Email (optional) toninho shedendexile Reply Report Soccer Report | Pick tobeco Share on Twitter Twitter Twitter Agbonlahor gives Capello extra forward dimension England shedendexile Report Facebook Share on Facebook Gelatine…..As much as it galls me to admit it, our best chance might just be Arsenal`s babes.tobeco….Lay off cfcgazz mate, he`s having an off-night. He is usually spot-on!! Loading comments… Trouble loading? 0 1 Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other 20 Nov 2008 19:54 i thought Agbonlahor’s movement was poor. Sure hes good running onto a long pass or at a defender but he doesnt show much footballing intelligence you need at international level.England dont have any strikers of note except Rooney. Share on Twitter | Pick Facebook 0 1 Share Facebook Share on Twitter SWP – sigh.Whatever you think about David Beckham, Eric Cantona, Gazza etc. the best stories you heard about them were their work ethic. Staying behind after training, hour after hour working on skills.Practise. Practise. Practise.All those years at Chelsea. All those free days when not playing. Did SWP ever practice his crossing ?Cos’ it sure don’t look like it ! Share on Messenger Share on Facebook Share KeithSimmonds Facebook The difference Capello has made is clear. It’s called belief. I was at Wembley for England v Germany last year and the Germans were no better that night but we just caved after a bright start. Players didn’t look like they wanted it or knew how to get it. There was no way we were going to come back from a deficit, whereas last night, after the Terry/Carson calamity, we stayed positive and always looked dangerous with Bridge and Downing particularly effective.The tempo was great from the start and we never let them settle, with Barry and Carrick hassling their men high up the field, especially in the first half. It’s obvious stuff but you need someone with enormous self-belief to convince the players that they can do the obvious stuff.McClaren never had it. He showed that, firstly, by his disastrous choice of Venables as deputy, as if choosing the Press’s golden boy would help his cause (whereas it merely undermined it), then compounded the error by losing the plot after one disappointing performance against Macedonia, who had also held Eriksson’s team to a draw. Croatia in Zagreb was where he was found out. Changing course midstream, experimenting with a Venables-style formation, making young players scapegoats, made everyone question his judgement and lose faith. Capello just sticks to what he knows because he knows it will work, and surrounds himself with astute lieutenants like Baldini. Impressive. Share on Twitter 0 1 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share Share | Pick Share on Twitter 4 Twitter 20 Nov 2008 18:53 | Pick 20 Nov 2008 19:45 Report SteveMaybury Reply Share Report Report Share on Twitter Order by oldest Facebook 20 Nov 2008 18:58 Reply | Pick Oh, and Mancie…can`t be arsed….Too much French spelling. Let`s just say, from the little I`ve seen, what Marcel passed on to John is taking a while to trickle down to Michael. 20 Nov 2008 18:54 Report expanded Report 0 1 | Pick Share Share on Facebook Facebook 50 Richard Williams at the Olympiastadion | Pick Share on Twitter 20 Nov 2008 17:52 Twitter Reply Share on Twitter Share Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Facebook 0 1 Share on Twitter 20 Nov 2008 18:46 recommendations 0 1 Sportblog Share on Twitter | Pick Support The Guardian 0 1 Twitter Invictus7last_img
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A December To Remember

first_imgEight days remain in December, but already it’s been a December to remember from a Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement perspective.Thus far this month, there have been four corporate enforcement actions resulting in $923 million in settlement amounts.The stocking stuffer of course was yesterday’s announcement by the DOJ of a $772 million FCPA enforcement action against Alstom and related entities.While the Alstom enforcement action is the largest DOJ FCPA enforcement action of all-time, it is the second largest overall FCPA enforcement action of all-time behind the 2008 Siemens enforcement action ($450 million DOJ component and a $350 million SEC component).  To see the current FCPA top-ten settlement list, click here.The Alstom resolution documents total approximately 400 pages.  A future post will comprehensively summarize these documents.In short, and as highlighted in the DOJ’s release:“Alstom pleaded guilty to a two-count criminal information filed today in the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut, charging the company with violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) by falsifying its books and records and failing to implement adequate internal controls.  Alstom admitted its criminal conduct and agreed to pay a criminal penalty of $772,290,000.  U.S. District Judge Janet B. Arterton of the District of Connecticut scheduled a sentencing hearing for June 23, 2015.In addition, Alstom Network Schweiz AG, formerly Alstom Prom (Alstom Prom), Alstom’s Swiss subsidiary, pleaded guilty to a criminal information charging the company with conspiracy to violate the anti-bribery provisions of the FCPA.  Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom Power) and Alstom Grid Inc. (Alstom Grid), two U.S. subsidiaries, both entered into deferred prosecution agreements, admitting that they conspired to violate the anti-bribery provisions of the FCPA.  Alstom Power is headquartered in Windsor, Connecticut, and Alstom Grid, formerly Alstom T&D, was headquartered in New Jersey.According to the companies’ admissions, Alstom, Alstom Prom, Alstom Power and Alstom Grid, through various executives and employees, paid bribes to government officials and falsified books and records in connection with power, grid and transportation projects for state-owned entities around the world, including in Indonesia, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, the Bahamas and Taiwan.  In Indonesia, for example, Alstom, Alstom Prom, and Alstom Power paid bribes to government officials – including a high-ranking member of the Indonesian Parliament and high-ranking members of Perusahaan Listrik Negara, the state-owned electricity company in Indonesia – in exchange for assistance in securing several contracts to provide power-related services valued at approximately $375 million.  In total, Alstom paid more than $75 million to secure $4 billion in projects around the world, with a profit to the company of approximately $300 million.Alstom and its subsidiaries also attempted to conceal the bribery scheme by retaining consultants purportedly to provide consulting services on behalf of the companies, but who actually served as conduits for corrupt payments to the government officials.  […]The plea agreement cites many factors considered by the department in reaching the appropriate resolution, including:  Alstom’s failure to voluntarily disclose the misconduct even though it was aware of related misconduct at a U.S. subsidiary that previously resolved corruption charges with the department in connection with a power project in Italy; Alstom’s refusal to fully cooperate with the department’s investigation for several years; the breadth of the companies’ misconduct, which spanned many years, occurred in countries around the globe and in several business lines, and involved sophisticated schemes to bribe high-level government officials; Alstom’s lack of an effective compliance and ethics program at the time of the conduct; and Alstom’s prior criminal misconduct, including conduct that led to resolutions with various other governments and the World Bank.After the department publicly charged several Alstom executives, however, Alstom began providing thorough cooperation, including assisting the department’s prosecution of other companies and individuals.”Stay tuned for a future post that will comprehensively summarize the various prongs of the Alstom enforcement action.last_img read more

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New Baker McKenzie Franchise Expert Discusses Move Trends

first_imgNot a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Lost your password? Remember me © 2014 The Texas Lawbook.By Brooks IgoStaff Writer for The Texas Lawbook(February 26) — Domestic and international franchise experts Will Woods and Ann Hurwitz recently joined Baker & McKenzie’s Dallas office from Baker Botts. The duo has represented companies in the hospitality, restaurant and retail industries.Woods, who focuses his practice on franchise M&A, said Baker & McKenzie’s 75 offices worldwide were a big factor in his decision to lateral over.“Baker & McKenzie has a market leading network,” he said. “It is a terrific . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.center_img Password Usernamelast_img read more

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Higher circulating vitamin D levels linked with lower colorectal cancer risk

first_imgJun 14 2018A new study authored by scientists from the American Cancer Society, the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, the U.S. National Cancer Institute, and more than 20 other medical centers and organizations finds that higher circulating vitamin D concentrations are significantly associated with lower colorectal cancer risk. This study strengthens the evidence, previously considered inconclusive, for a protective relationship. Optimal vitamin D concentrations for colorectal cancer prevention may be higher than the current National Academy of Medicine recommendations, which are based only on bone health. The study appears online in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.Vitamin D, known for its role in maintaining bone health, is hypothesized to lower colorectal cancer risk via several pathways related to cell growth and regulation. Previous prospective studies have reported inconsistent results for whether higher concentrations of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the accepted measure of vitamin D status, are linked to lower risk of colorectal cancer. The few randomized clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation and colorectal cancer completed thus far have not shown an effect; but study size, supplementation duration, and compliance may have contributed to their null findings.”To address inconsistencies in prior studies on vitamin D and to investigate associations in population subgroups, we analyzed participant-level data, collected before colorectal cancer diagnosis, from 17 prospective cohorts and used standardized criteria across the studies,” said Stephanie Smith-Warner, PhD, an epidemiologist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and co-senior author on the article. The analysis included over 5,700 colorectal cancer cases and 7,100 controls from the United States, Europe, and Asia. A single, widely accepted assay and laboratory was used for new vitamin D measurements and calibration of existing vitamin D measurements. “In the past, substantial differences between assays made it difficult to integrate vitamin D data from different studies,” explained Regina G. Ziegler, PhD, a National Cancer Institute epidemiologist and co-senior author on the article. “This calibration approach enabled us to systematically explore risk over the broad range of vitamin D levels seen internationally.”Related StoriesNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerResearchers use AI to develop early gastric cancer endoscopic diagnosis systemResearchers identify potential drug target for multiple cancer typesCompared to participants with circulating vitamin D concentrations considered sufficient for bone health, those with deficient concentrations of vitamin D had a 31% higher risk of colorectal cancer during follow-up, which averaged 5.5 years (range: 1 – 25 years). Similarly, concentrations above bone health sufficiency were associated with a 22% lower risk. However, risk did not continue to decline at the highest concentrations. These associations persisted even after adjusting for known colorectal cancer risk factors. Protective associations were seen in all subgroups examined. However, the association was noticeably stronger in women than men at concentrations above bone health sufficiency. The lifetime risk of colorectal cancer is 4.2% (1 in 24) in women and 4.5% (1 in 22) in men. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in both men and women in the United States, with about 140,250 new cases and 50,630 deaths expected during 2018.”Currently, health agencies do not recommend vitamin D for the prevention of colorectal cancer,” said Marji L. McCullough, ScD, American Cancer Society epidemiologist and co-first author of the study. “This study adds new information that agencies can use when reviewing evidence for vitamin D guidance and suggests that the concentrations recommended for bone health may be lower than would be optimal for colorectal cancer prevention.”Vitamin D can be obtained in the diet, particularly from fortified foods, from supplements, and from sun exposure. Experts recommend vitamin D be obtained through diet whenever possible because excessive ultraviolet radiation is a major risk factor for skin cancer. Source:https://www.cancer.org/last_img read more

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Zika virusrelated pregnancy loss in humans may be more common than thought

first_img Source:https://www.niaid.nih.gov/news-events/pregnancy-loss-occurs-26-percent-zika-infected-monkeys Jul 3 2018Fetal death in utero occurred in more than one-fourth of monkeys infected in the laboratory with Zika virus in early pregnancy, according to new research published in Nature Medicine. The finding raises the concern that Zika virus-associated pregnancy loss in humans may be more common than currently thought, according to the study authors.A large team of experts aggregated data on Zika-infected macaques from six National Primate Research Centers (NPRCs) in the United States for the new analysis. The study was funded in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), both components of the National Institutes of Health.Related StoriesStudy uncovers potential new way to prevent common pregnancy-related complicationsPre-pregnancy maternal obesity may affect growth of breastfeeding infantsCannabis use during pregnancy may cause premature birthZika virus is most often transmitted to humans via the bite of an infected Aedes aegypti mosquito. It also is transmitted sexually. Many people infected with Zika virus will not have symptoms; others may have fever, rash, headache, joint pain, red eyes, and muscle pain. Zika virus can be passed from an infected pregnant woman to her fetus and cause a range of birth defects collectively known as congenital Zika syndrome. Although Zika virus was first discovered in 1947, Zika-related birth defects were not reported until 2015 during a large outbreak of Zika in the Americas. No licensed treatments or vaccines for Zika virus are currently available, but many are in various stages of development. For example, NIAID is leading an international Phase 2 trial of an experimental Zika vaccine.Research recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine showed a 5.8 percent miscarriage rate and a 1.8 percent stillbirth rate in a cohort of pregnant women with symptomatic Zika virus infection in French Guiana, Guadalupe or Martinique. Authors of the new nonhuman primate analysis note that the rates from the NEJM study could be an underestimate–the study included only symptomatic pregnant women, whereas many people with Zika infection are asymptomatic.For the new analysis, experts combined published and unpublished data from various studies of pregnant macaques infected with Zika virus. Fetal death (miscarriage or stillbirth) occurred in 13 of 50 (26 percent) of the animals studied. Macaques infected early in pregnancy had significantly higher rates of fetal death than those infected after gestation day 55. The results track with human data showing more severe fetal outcomes in women infected with Zika in their first trimester compared to those infected later in pregnancy. The rates of fetal death in macaques underscore the need for careful monitoring of fetal loss and stillbirth in Zika-affected human pregnancies, the authors write.last_img read more

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New improved method to judge effectiveness of experimental therapies for neurodegeneration

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 27 2018Researchers at UBC’s Okanagan campus have developed a new and improved method to judge the effectiveness of experimental therapies for neurodegeneration–the progressive loss of neurons.”Neurons–or nerve cells–are hugely important to our daily lives,” says post doctoral fellow Aaron Johnstone and study lead author. “These specialized cells collect and process the large amounts of information that enter our bodies via our senses, control our muscles and organs, and form our thoughts and memories. When these cells become unhealthy, it leads to diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, ALS, glaucoma and chronic pain.”Related StoriesNew shingles vaccine reduces outbreaks of painful rash among stem cell transplant patientsNew study reveals ‘clutch’ proteins responsible for putting T cell activation ‘into gear’Slug serves as ‘command central’ for determining breast stem cell healthJohnstone says his study uses the first automated test specifically designed for measuring degeneration of sensory neurons grown in a lab.”The variability in nerve cell lengths, densities and shapes have traditionally made it difficult to reliably analyze their health,” says Johnstone. “This, in turn, has generated confusion about the effectiveness of potential pharmacological or genetic treatments.”Using the new approach, which is software-assisted, the research team were able to measure nerve cell densities more accurately.To do this the team grew nerve cells in a lab environment, and after establishing healthy neurons researchers mimicked the conditions that cause neurodegeneration. Neuron loss was then captured using fluorescent microcopy–a process that makes the tiny cells easier to see–and analyzed using a computer algorithm.Johnstone suggests that objective measurement is essential to the process of developing new medicines.”This procedure makes evaluating new treatment options, like drugs or gene therapies, far more accurate and trustworthy,” Johnstone adds. Source:https://ok.ubc.ca/last_img read more

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Training pediatricians to better diagnose and treat epilepsy

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 4 2018Imagine if most children with cancer were treated by a doctor with no training or experience in cancer. It doesn’t seem possible. In epilepsy, however, it’s more common than not. That’s because pediatric neurologists are few and far between in almost every country; in some countries there are no specialists at all, or only a handful to serve millions of children. In addition, local medical personnel-; pediatricians, family doctors, physician assistants and nurses-;often have little training in, knowledge of or experience with epilepsy.This phenomenon was known, and accepted, for many decades. Until a perfect storm of events in the United Kingdom began to change everything.A turning point for epilepsy careAt the turn of this century, a report quietly released in London made clear that in the UK, most children with epilepsy were treated by pediatricians with no specialized training in epilepsy. This report followed on the heels of at least five similar reports.At about the same time, a pediatrician in England came under investigation for misdiagnosing and overtreating children with epilepsy. Amid lawsuits and headlines, it was clear that this doctor had no malicious intent-;and that his high rate of misdiagnosis was far from unusual among general physicians. At the time, only 62 pediatric neurologists served the entire United Kingdom, so most children with epilepsy would never see one.Then a UK survey -; The National Sentinel Clinical Audit of Epilepsy-Related Death -; found that 77% of children who died with epilepsy had deficiencies in their care, and 59% of the deaths were avoidable. The numbers of children studied were small, but the conclusions were powerful.Both the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network had published guidelines on the diagnosis and management of epilepsy in children. Yet the reports, surveys and investigations highlighted a tremendous gap between those guidelines and everyday practice.Pediatric neurologists and the British Paediatric Neurology Association (BPNA) realized that something had to be done to raise the standard of care, said Philippa Rodie, BPNA executive director. “The BPNA decided to train pediatricians to better diagnose epilepsy and treat it, and how to recognize when to refer children to specialists,” she said.The result was Pediatric Epilepsy Training (PET).Providing training, reducing stigmaThe BPNA established three courses: PET1, and PET2 & 3. The higher-level courses are specialized and are intended for pediatricians, nurses and trainees who wish to develop a specialty in epilepsy.The association’s PET1 course casts the widest net. It’s aimed at all health professionals -; anyone who may see or treat a child who could have epilepsy, said Rodie. “I’ve stopped talking about people’s job titles [as a requirement] for this course,” she said. “It’s not about the job title; it’s about people who see children.”PET1 teaches how to differentiate between what is epilepsy and what isn’t, as well as how to distinguish among the different types of epilepsy. It covers treatment, referral skills, comprehensive care planning and a focus on the holistic care of the child-;and the family.”There’s a huge amount of stigma attached to epilepsy around the world,” said Rodie. “Kids end up being excluded from activities, and in some parts of the world they’re excluded from school altogether. The course encourages offering the family information to give to the teacher about what to do if the child has a seizure, or to the football coach or ballet instructor-;so the child can lead a normal life.”Courses are run by trained, volunteer faculty members -; usually pediatric neurologists, pediatricians and epilepsy nurses -; and are limited to 48 attendees. Each day-long course consists of lectures and smaller workshops that allow for interaction and multiple forms of learning.In 2005, the BPNA ran the first PET1 course in the UK. By 2014, more than 4,500 people had attended.Making a differenceAlso between 2005 and 2014, the UK experienced dramatic improvements in pediatric epilepsy care, including annual decreases in incidence (presumably reflecting fewer misdiagnoses), improved adherence to nationally published clinical guidelines, and the establishment and expansion of epilepsy care teams, clinics and networks. PET1 courses have been cited as one of several pivotal factors underlying this sea change, and the Joint Epilepsy Council bestowed an award on BPNA for its efforts. The Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health now requires PET attendance for any pediatrician who wishes to register with the National Health Service as having a special interest in epilepsy.Besides their official endorsement, PET1 courses have real-world clout among health care providers. Though the courses are not mandatory, PET1 attendance is often a requirement on job descriptions for pediatricians who will be seeing children with epilepsy. And pediatricians themselves expect that colleagues who see children with seizures will have attended the course.After a few years of running courses, it was clear that pediatricians in the UK were spreading the word to their colleagues around the world. The BPNA began receiving inquiries from other countries grappling with the same issues. In 2012, the BPNA began offering PET1 in Qatar. In 2013, it started courses in United Arab Emirates. In 2014, courses were established in India.By the end of this year, 13 countries across 5 continents will be offering PET1: Brazil, India, Ireland, Ghana, Kenya, Myanmar, New Zealand, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, United Arab Emirates and the UK. More countries are in the works, Rodie said, though “We have a longer list of countries that want these courses than we have resources.”How it works: Delivering PET around the worldHow do countries begin delivering PET courses? It begins with an inquiry to the BPNA from a local pediatric association or ILAE chapter. That’s followed by discussion, a proposal and a signed agreement about running the courses (“memorandum of understanding”).”The memorandum spells out what BPNA will do and what the association or chapter will do, so everyone’s clear about expectations,” Rodie said. “We have clear aims in line with local and national targets around the management of epilepsy.” The local contact recruits faculty, who must be affiliated with a local pediatric neurology association or ILAE chapter. “We look for people who are part of epilepsy networks, who are well trained, and who have credibility in the community,” Rodie said.BPNA then travels to the country, trains the faculty and launches the first PET1 course, all in one go. On the first day, BPNA trainers deliver the course to the new faculty members. The second day is training day, on which new faculty learn how to teach the course. On the third day, with the BPNA trainers as mentors, the newly trained faculty deliver their first PET1 course to paying attendees.To bring dozens of busy pediatricians together in one place for multiple days isn’t easy or inexpensive, so efficiency is key. “In India we had faculty leads in four cities, and they each recruited six to eight faculty members and brought them all to one site,” Rodie said. “We trained them all, so by the end of the three days, we had groups that could run courses in those four cities.”Earlier this year, BPNA followed the same model in Kenya. “We had leads from Kenya, Ghana, Uganda and Tanzania -; they’d each recruited faculty,” she said. “They all came to Kenya, we delivered the training there and they went back to their countries.” Ghana and Uganda have delivered two courses each to local attendees. Tanzania and Kenya have courses scheduled later in 2018.Each group must offer a minimum of one course a year for five years. “Sudan, Ghana and Tanzania are running two courses, two days in a row,” Rodie noted. “That’s a very efficient way of running it financially, because the faculty have to travel only once, but they can deliver the course to 96 people.”Related StoriesCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeMany thyroid cancer patients have no choice about radioactive iodine, study revealsInternational cooperationShortly after its development, PET1 was updated every other year; now, it’s updated every three years. At the most recent review meeting, BPNA welcomed 21 reviewers from 12 countries.”What we thought would happen [at the review] was that we’d get people from all these countries and they’d say, ‘We need to develop the course for my country like this’, but they found consensus – anything they needed to alter for their country, they discovered that other people had the same issue,” said Rodie. “We ended up with a generic course, with just a few specific changes for for certain countries.”The ILAE formally endorsed PET in December 2017 and will be working with the BPNA to ensure its global research increases. The collaboration allows the ILAE and its national chapters to encourage and support basic epilepsy education to front-line health care providers through the expertise of the BPNA in areas of the world where there is a great need.PET1 has been translated into Portuguese and Spanish for use in Central and South America. Brazil is the first country to use the translated course; it will launch its first PET1 course in September 2018.Changing practice -; for the betterThe course is well-received by attendees. In post-course surveys, 99% rate the course as excellent or very good, and 95% said they would definitely recommend the course to colleagues.Each attendee takes a quiz before and after the course, so BPNA can assess baseline knowledge and the course’s effect. Six months after each course, BPNA emails a survey to the attendees to measure their changes in attitudes and practice. “We want to see if what they’ve learned has made a difference on the ground,” said Rodie.Here’s a sampling of results from 2017 surveys: PET in AfricaThe need for pediatric epilepsy knowledge in Africa is acute; most countries have no pediatric neurologists, and the rest have only a few. For example, Ghana, with a population of 28 million people, has two accredited pediatric neurologists. At the same time, epilepsy is one of the major disease burdens across the continent.In February 2016, 35 doctors from 10 African countries met in Cape Town for PET1 training. Jo Wilmshurst, head of pediatric neurology at Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital, University of Cape Town, coordinated the training after seeing Sudan establish PET1. The idea was to rotate PET1 courses across key regions in South Africa.Two years later, demand for PET1 in Africa had skyrocketed. A second training course took place in April 2018 in Kenya, resulting in enough trained faculty members to offer courses in Ghana, Uganda, Tanzania and Kenya. In 2019, they hope to offer courses in Ethiopia. By the end of 2018, Wilmshurst says, more than 400 attendees will have taken PET1 in Africa.”The practical and concise nature of the course has a huge impact on providing pathways to empower health care practitioners to deliver better care,” Wilmshurst said. “Following the recommendations in the PET course enables standardization of the approach to many common situations in the care of children with seizures. This training has been lacking in Africa, and the enthusiasm of the clinicians illustrates the need for this intervention.”GhanaPET’s impact is powerful, agreed Charles Hammond, a PET faculty member and pediatric neurologist at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana. As with most other countries, Ghana’s specialists practice in the major cities. Most children with epilepsy live hundreds of miles away, so they get care from pediatricians, general physicians and physician assistants.Hammond viewed becoming a PET1 faculty member as an “excellent opportunity to improve my knowledge and skill in managing epilepsy in children . . . and bring knowledge to pediatricians and other doctors in Ghana who manage children with epilepsy.”KenyaIn Kenya, the courses have already begun to change the way that pediatricians manage epilepsy care, said Pauline Samia, PET faculty member and interim chair of the Department of Pediatrics at Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi. “We hope to be able to impact medical officers in this region as well, given that only a small proportion of children have access to a pediatrician for their care,” she said. One clear impact of PET1 is that Kenyan physicians are now petitioning county governments and hospitals to provide a consistent supply of anti-epilepsy drugs.SudanAhlam Hamed attended PET1 training in India and has helped to oversee four courses in Sudan, where she is a pediatric neurologist at Soba University Hospital and associate professor at the University of Khartoum. “These courses enable us to distribute basic pediatric epilepsy knowledge-;mainly, the wide range of non-epilepsy diagnosis possibilities and the limited diagnostic value of EEG,” she said. Hamed hopes that the increased knowledge of how to manage status epilepticus will engender support to bring buccal midazolam to Sudan (it is currently not available), as well as to reductions in morbidity and mortality.UgandaAngelina Kakooza-Mwesige has been involved with PET1 since 2016. Kakooza is a pediatric neurologist and lecturer at the School of Medicine, Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala. She envisions a future in which the course has helped epilepsy knowledge increase in Uganda to a tipping point, after which “it will greatly improve the practice and standard of care for children with epilepsy in the region,” she said. “Children will obtain standard diagnoses and proper treatment, a full work-up of each child will be done and there will be cross-country consultations on difficult cases.” 85% report improved diagnosis skills 82% report improved history taking  80% are trying to improve the way that clinical services are set up to support children with epilepsy  63% say they more quickly recognise when a patient needs to be referred to an expert  58% report they always provide first aid advice to parents and caregivers  57% have introduced changes that have improved information sharing in their unit 54% have introduced changes that have improved the management of prolonged seizurescenter_img Source:https://www.ilae.org/last_img read more

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The iron driver of climate change

Mining the exotic metals used in modern electronics inflicts a lot of damage on the environment, especially by polluting the atmosphere with carbon dioxide. But overall, the global warming impact of metals is still dominated by the old-school elements iron and aluminum. That’s one of the bottom lines from a comprehensive environmental analysis of 63 metals, published this week in PLOS ONE. Iron (Fe), and its alloy steel, are the dirtiest of the bunch, responsible for 30% of all industrial CO2 emissions. The runner up is aluminum (Al) at 2% of CO2. In third place—perhaps a surprise to some readers—is calcium (Ca), an alkaline earth metal. It’s mined for quicklime, an ingredient in cement. (What typically consumes the most energy is not getting the rock out of the ground, but refining the ore. All told, producing metals takes 9.5% of world energy.) Other environmental damage related to production, such as acid-mine drainage, is also dominated by these common metals. A unique aspect of the study is that it teases apart the environmental impact of each element, even though many are mined or processed in combinations. The detailed analysis could help engineers design products that substitute more benign metals. read more

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Lonely starlings stare at strangers

first_imgIf you find people watching oddly compelling, you’re not alone. A new study suggests that gregarious European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) get a kick out of looking at their fellow birds, even if it’s just on a computer screen. Researchers took 10 captive starlings from their flock and isolated them for 4 days in a cage with plenty of food and water and a large flat-screen monitor. Most of the birds quickly discovered that poking their beaks into one sensor in the cage flashed a life-size photograph of an unknown starling onto the screen, while a second sensor produced a picture of a suburban landscape. The lonely birds seemed to enjoy looking at other starlings, the researchers found. On average, they triggered a new starling photo every 6 minutes, 7 hours a day, for 4 days. They only threw in a landscape every 20 minutes or so. It wasn’t just that the landscapes were boring. Given the choice between photos of starlings and photos of monkeys, a second group of five birds also pecked to view their own kind three times more often. The results suggest starlings have a natural yearning for social stimulation, the authors report online this month in Animal Cognition. In the future, starlings’ drive to view photos of one another could be used to study the social rewards that knit communities together.last_img read more

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Top stories Supercharging renewable energy Babylonian calculus and the bizarre fish of

first_imgBizarre desert-dwelling fish may have evolved just a couple hundred years agoThe middle of the Nevada desert seems an unlikely spot to find a fish. But an underground fissure in scorching-hot Death Valley is the only natural habitat for the endangered Devils Hole pupfish, a silvery blue creature about the size of a pet goldfish. A new study suggests that the fish colonized its watery cavern somewhere between 105 and 830 years ago, making scientists rethink how it got there in the first place.Better power lines would help U.S. supercharge renewable energy, study suggests Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Email Analysts have long argued that nations aiming to use wind and solar power to curb emissions from fossil fuel burning would first have to invest heavily in new technologies to store electricity—after all, the sun isn’t always shining, and the wind isn’t always blowing. But a study out this week suggests that the United States could—at least in theory—use new high-voltage power lines to move renewable power across the nation.Math whizzes of ancient Babylon figured out forerunner of calculusTracking and recording the motion of the sun, the moon, and the planets as they paraded across the desert sky, ancient Babylonian astronomers used simple arithmetic to predict the positions of celestial bodies. Now, new evidence reveals that these astronomers, working several centuries B.C.E., also employed sophisticated geometric methods that foreshadow the development of calculus.Consciousness may be the product of carefully balanced chaosIs my yellow the same as your yellow? The question of whether the human consciousness is subjective or objective is largely philosophical. But the line between consciousness and unconsciousness is a bit easier to measure. In a new study, researchers suggest that our experience of reality is the product of a delicate balance of connectivity between neurons—too much or too little and consciousness slips away.Were cats domesticated more than once?The rise of cats may have been inevitable. That’s one intriguing interpretation of a new study, which finds that early Chinese farmers may have domesticated wild felines known as leopard cats more than 5000 years ago. If true, this would indicate that cats were domesticated more than once—in China, and 5000 years earlier in the Middle East.New Mexico’s American Indian population crashed 100 years after Europeans arrivedIn the 1500s, the ponderosa pine forests of Jemez province in New Mexico were home to between 5000 and 8000 people. But after Europeans arrived in the area, the native population plummeted by more than 80%, probably because of a series of devastating epidemics. A new study suggests that the crash took place 100 years after the first contact with Europeans, and that it had dramatic ecological effects.last_img read more

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Ancient DNA suggests the first Americans sidestepped the glaciers

first_img Before 12,600 years ago, the researchers say, the more interior route into the Americas was blocked. Instead, early settlers may have taken a coastal route as early as 14,700 years ago. Mikkel Winther Pedersen Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe To see into the corridor’s past, the new study looked at pollen, plant, and animal fossils from nine sediment cores taken from two lakes near what was thought to have been the narrowest bottleneck in the corridor—the last part to open. The modern lakes are the remnants of a giant prehistoric lake, known as glacial Lake Peace, which covered much of the area between the retreating glaciers. From the cores, the scientists also extracted eDNA—DNA lingering in the soil from, for example, plant leaves, rootlets, animal feces, urine, or even skin cells. Because DNA is electrically charged, it can bind to sediment particles, helping to preserve it from degradation over time. Taken together, these data paint a detailed picture of the ecology of the corridor as it transitioned from icy wasteland to fertile forest. For about 700 years after the ice retreated, there was scant evidence of any life, Willerslev says. Then, about 12,600 years ago, steppe plants like aromatic sagebrush appeared, followed soon after by animals such as woolly mammoth, bison, and jackrabbits. By about 12,400 years ago, forests of Populus trees—such as aspen and poplar—began to dominate, after which elk and moose arrived. About 11,600 years ago, the region transformed again into a boreal forest of spruce and pine trees.But this opening and flourishing occurred too late for the migrating humans who arrived in the Americas about 15,000 years ago, the authors report online today in Nature. It was even too late for the Clovis people, who arrived about 13,000 years ago, they say.Instead, Willerslev says, both pre-Clovis and Clovis peoples may have taken the so-called coastal route, which would have taken them down along the western coast of North America, a much-discussed path with scant hard data to support it. He says he hopes to use eDNA to hunt for evidence of their passage. “The idea is that there was a land bridge a few thousand years earlier than the formation of the ice-free corridor,” he says. “That land is now covered by ocean, but there are some islands believed to be part of that route. It would be interesting to go and look for cores and try to do the same exercise there.”Other recent evidence supports the idea that the earliest human migrants to the Americas—the pre-Clovis people—didn’t enter through the Canadian corridor. For example, a recent study of mitochondrial DNA in northern and southern populations of bison separated by the corridor suggest the passage opened up slightly earlier than the present study posits—13,000 years ago instead of 12,600 years ago. In terms of that timing, “it’s a pretty subtle difference,” says Duane Froese, a geoscientist from the University of Alberta, Edmonton, in Canada, and a co-author of that study.But when it comes to estimating the opening of the ice-free corridor, the devil may be in those details—in part because the slightly earlier opening suggested by the bison mitochondrial DNA would have allowed the Clovis people to take it. Willerslev questions the reliability of using just one organism to record environmental history. But Froese points to several other fragments of data from the region that suggest the corridor was habitable earlier: a 13,700-year-old fragment of a poplar tree and a 13,100-year-old bison found near the bottleneck.Jackson notes that the eDNA evidence is powerful and fills in many gaps left by conventional paleoecological data. For example, certain trees—Populus is a particularly well-known example—are poorly represented in the pollen record, even when they were certainly present. eDNA offers a detailed snapshot of local flora and fauna that passed through a particular location, from bison stepping into the lake to pikefish swimming in it. But, Jackson adds, eDNA paleoecological research is still new, and there remain lingering questions about how eDNA is represented in sediments and what exactly the data mean.Froese is optimistic. “It’s great from a science point of view that we don’t completely agree,” he says of his team’s work and Willerslev’s. “I hope this will be good impetus for future research.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Ask any schoolkid how the first people came to the Americas, and you might get some version of the following: They crossed a spit of land connecting Alaska and Siberia and made their way south between melting glaciers at the end of the last ice age. Until recently, science agreed. But mounting evidence has shown that the dry land exposed by the melted route—known as the ice-free corridor—may not have been passable until long after humans had already settled the Americas. So when did it become a viable route for people? Using ancient DNA, along with the remains of pollen, plants, and animals collected from lake sediments, a new study has an answer: about 12,600 years ago. This suggests that the earliest humans to make their homes in the New World, including people from the Clovis civilization, must have taken a very different route.“This is a really neat and pioneering study,” says Stephen Jackson, a paleoecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey’s Southwest Climate Science Center in Tucson, Arizona, who was not involved in the work. Because this is the first study to take into account both so-called environmental DNA (eDNA) as well as more traditional types of data, he says, “we stand to learn a good deal more about how to interpret our records.”Scientists have long thought that humans traveled across a region knowns as Beringia, a now-submerged area in the Bering Sea that was dry land during the lower sea levels of the last ice age.  What humans did next has always been a big question. Until recently, most researchers thought that the ice-free corridor (see map) was the most likely route south, once the glaciers began melting 14,000–15,000 years ago. For years, those dates fit the timing of the Clovis people, big game hunters thought to have inhabited the lower 48 about 13,000 years ago. But in the past decade, scientists have discovered even earlier settlements, revealing that humans made the journey to the Americas as early as about 15,000 years ago. The key question, says Eske Willerslev, a paleoecologist at the University of Copenhagen and a co-author of the study, is when the ice-free corridor really became viable for humans to cross it. At about 1500 kilometers long, large animal game would be essential to making the journey, he says. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emaillast_img read more

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Science in the Oval Office 1933–2016

first_img 1953 Bill Clinton 1993–2001 Events: Economic boom, globalization Although science-related issues are rarely discussed during an election campaign, every president must be ready to address them once in office. How have past presidents responded? With help from a score of experts (for more of their thoughts, see story that follows the timeline), we have analyzed the track records of the past 13 presidents, and identified key science-related issues and decisions they faced. We have also included major events that defined their time in the White House. 1993 Clinton ’89 H. W. Bush Policies: Orders dropping of two atomic bombs on Japan and the development and testing of the thermonuclear (hydrogen) bomb Signs laws creating the Atomic Energy Commission, National Science Foundation (NSF) and Office of Naval Research George W. Bush 2001–09 Events: 9/11 attacks, anthrax letters, begins Iraq and Afghanistan wars Policies: Proposes Strategic Defense Initiative, which includes space- and land-based lasers for shooting down Soviet nuclear missiles Signs Montreal Protocol curbing use of chemicals that destroy the ozone layer Backs expansion of Small Business Innovation Research program, begun at NSF, to nurture high-tech startups Backs Sematech chip manufacturing consortium to help U.S. companies compete globally Proposes Space Station Freedom, which ultimately evolves into the International Space Station Backs construction of Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), a giant underground accelerator to study collisions of high-energy subatomic particles 1963 Johnson 2001 ’63 1961 Jimmy Carter 1977–81 Events: Energy crisis, Three Mile Island Policies: Backs funding for Apollo program to send astronauts to the moon DARPA’s support for computer science leads to ARPA Network, precursor of the internet Authorizes extensive use of defoliant Agent Orange as an offensive weapon in Vietnam 1989 Gerald Ford 1974–77 Events: Energy crisis, swine flu 1969 Policies: Top-secret Manhattan project to build the atom bomb Rural electrification through the Tennessee Valley Authority and a national network of hydroelectric dams Asks science adviser Vannevar Bush for a report, Science: The Endless Frontier, that enshrines principle of government support for academic research and training Signs legislation creating the National Cancer Institute Policies: Signs legislation creating NASA Catalyzes creation of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Signs international treaty preserving Antarctica as a neutral site for scientific exploration, a follow-up to the International Geophysical Year Oversees post-Sputnik funding boom to support research and advanced scientific training Creates mechanism for providing science advice to the president and federal agencies Policies: Signs major environmental laws, including the Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act, National Environmental Policy Act, Endangered Species Act, and the Marine Mammal Protection Act Signs Biological Weapons Convention, prohibiting development, production, and stockpiling Negotiates Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty with Soviet Union limiting each nation to two sites and 100 defensive missiles Signs National Cancer Act and declares “war on cancer” Begins development of reusable space shuttle to low Earth orbit Proposes United States build supersonic passenger aircraft, but Congress kills funding ’77 Policies: Signs law creating White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and new presidential advisory body White House backs federal funding for recombinant DNA research after Asilomar conference identifies safe path for such research Science in the Oval Office: 1933–2016 1981 Reagan 2009 2016 2016 Franklin Roosevelt 1933–45 Events: Great Depression, World War II 2009 Obama George H. W. Bush 1989–93 Events: Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska, first Iraq war, breakup of Soviet Union ’69 Nixon ’74 Ford Ronald Reagan 1981–89 Events: Proxy wars, AIDS epidemic Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) ’77 Carter Policies: Signs Kyoto Protocol on climate change Congress cancels SSC, the giant accelerator begun under Reagan and backed by Bush, after cost overruns, delays, and technical difficulties International Space Station construction begins Supports development of high-speed scientific computing network that evolves into internet, and related policies on managing this new way to share information Lyndon Johnson 1963–69 Events: Vietnam War buildup ’61 Kennedy ’74 Richard Nixon 1969–74 Events: End of Vietnam War, oil embargo Assembling the timeline: Experts weigh in on who should get creditAs we set out to assemble this timeline, we knew that attributing major U.S. science policy developments over the last 80 years to the man occupying the White House at the time would be controversial. So we asked some 20 experts who have spent years tracking and shaping these policies to help us make the calls.Not surprisingly, those experts don’t always agree on who deserves credit or blame for every major policy decision. One reason, as President John Kennedy noted ruefully after the Bay of Pigs fiasco, is that “victory has 100 fathers and defeat is an orphan.” (And yes, we know Kennedy borrowed the quote from an Italian diplomat writing about World War II.) Policies: Exit from Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty Limits federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research to about 60 existing cell lines Signs America COMPETES Act to update research and education policies for key science agencies Backs White House–initiated effort to study research productivity and practices, often called the Science of Science Policy Policies: Proposes space program to build heavy launch rockets capable of landing humans on the moon Signs Limited Nuclear Test Ban Treaty to end underwater and atmospheric explosions and limit underground testing Signs legislation enabling firms to launch commercial communications satellites 1945 Truman Dwight Eisenhower 1953–61 Events: Sputnik Harry Truman 1945–53 Events: Start of the Cold War, Korean War 1933 1933 Roosevelt ’81 Policies: Backs use of ARPA-Energy to accelerate research and development in the field of sustainable energy Signs Paris climate agreement and issues numerous regulations aimed at curbing U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases Supports massive, short-term funding burst to spur economic recovery from financial collapse, including research and scientific infrastructure Expands national network of advanced manufacturing centers to improve the research base for this key industrial sector Proposes and implements initiatives on brain and precision medicine research Oct. 20, 2016 , 2:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country 2001 G. W. Bush 1945 Barack Obama 2009–present Events: Global recession, oil spill in Gulf of Mexico, continuation of Iraq and Afghanistan wars Policies: Backs major revision of the Clean Air Act aimed at curbing emissions from coal-fired power plants that contribute to acid rain Signs legislation funding the Human Genome Project Enters negotiations that ultimately produce the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Rejects signing the Convention on Biological Diversity 1953 Eisenhower John Kennedy 1961–63 Events: Cuban missile crisis Policies: Promotes energy efficiency and massive program to produce synfuels extracted from oil shale with goal of reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil Creates departments of energy and education Signs Bayh-Dole Act, which aims to speed commercialization of government-funded research by allowing academic researchers to claim ownership of intellectual property Opposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project, in line with stance of many arms control experts that it would create new supplies of plutonium Email ’93 But equally important is the fact that the internet—or the human genome project, a biological weapons treaty, and the Clean Air Act, for that matter—doesn’t come to pass because of one person, or even one administration. Standing up a new federal agency or funding a particular research initiative requires the assent of Congress, for one thing. And an individual legislator may deserve more credit than a sitting president for actually making something happen. Policymaking also takes time: Attempts to make permanent a corporate research tax credit, for example, spanned several administrations before President Barack Obama finally signed the provision into law last year.So what do the experts think about our list? Yale University science historian Daniel Kevles warned us about paying too much attention to Vannevar Bush’s Science, the Endless Frontier report on the future of U.S. science, commissioned by President Franklin Roosevelt as World War II drew to a close. “The Bush report is talismanic for scientists because it recommended the principle that the federal government establish peacetime support for basic scientific research and training,” he points out. “But if you read its contents, you will see that most of its particular recommendations were ignored.”The 1945 report is venerated in part because of the overriding importance to scientists of its subject matter, that is, federal funding of university research. And given their political preferences, many academics tend to reflexively credit Democratic administrations when research budgets grow and blame Republicans when they stay flat or shrink.But it’s not that simple, says Tobin Smith, vice president for policy at the Washington, D.C.–based Association of American Universities. Both parties have historically supported investments in basic research, he notes, and the circuitous path for the annual budget—from a president’s request to a final congressional appropriations bill up to a year later—complicates attempts to assign credit or blame for spending shifts. For example, “you mention the America COMPETES Act,” Smith wrote us, referring to the legislation passed by a Democratic Congress in 2007 that endorsed major budget increases at three key federal research agencies. “But don’t forget that [Republican] President George W. Bush called for ‘doubling funding for the physical sciences’ in his 2006 State of the Union address, and his American Competitiveness Initiative proposed significant increases over a 10-year period for the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy Office of Science, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.” Those increases didn’t materialize. But, in a sense, a Democratic Congress was simply following a Republican president’s lead.The terrain surrounding space policy is equally treacherous. The long time frames and enormous cost required to send humans to Mars, for example, afford opponents many opportunities to whittle down or kill such projects. At the same time, such projects often become symbols of national pride, and the economic benefits that can accrue to many regions of the country create powerful constituencies.The International Space Station is a good example of that complex interplay of politics and economics. President Ronald Reagan greenlighted a space station dubbed Freedom to assert U.S. hegemony in space over the Soviet Union in the 1980s. “But it was President [Bill] Clinton who ‘internationalized’ the space station” by inviting in other nations, including Japan and Russia, notes Chris Hill, a veteran Washington, D.C., insider on technology policy now consulting from Knoxville, Tennessee. “That decision gave life to a near-moribund project while also creating ‘space’ for U.S. and Russian scientists to work together after the fall of the USSR.”Presidential decisions affecting how science advice is delivered to the White House may seem like the quintessential inside-the-Beltway topic. But it’s on our list because we think it matters. At the same time, deciding what actions to attribute to which president is tricky. For example, we have credited Roosevelt with getting the ball rolling on creating a formal science advisory process, but President Dwight Eisenhower with actually setting up the first White House office to stay abreast of scientific developments.Since then, the state of science advising has ebbed and flowed. President Richard Nixon disbanded his council of scientific advisers in 1973 after its views clashed with his plans for an antiballistic missile system and supersonic airliners. But Congress rescued it 3 years later with legislation giving the science adviser two hats—one as someone who must report to Congress as director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the other as a confidential presidential adviser.A quarter-century later, many scientists excoriated President George W. Bush for reorganizing his staff so that his science adviser, John Marburger, didn’t report directly to him, a move they saw as a repudiation of the law’s intent. And in 2009, they roundly praised President Obama for restoring that direct relationship with his adviser, John Holdren. It remains to be seen how the next president will choose to get his or her technical advice.last_img read more

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