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Seven arrests made over football weekend

first_img Police also made several arrests on campus, with one man stopped on campus outside the Stadium for public intoxication, according to a statement issued by Phil Johnson, director of Notre Dame Security Police. For the next home game, the Notre Dame Cycling club, women’s water polo club and Notre Dame ROTC will be operating the pedal cabs. “When you have the teams within driving distance, you have larger crowds,” he said. Friday night’s drummer’s circle saw a large attendance also, he said. Seamon estimated 3,000 fans showed up. An estimated 95,000 people were on campus Saturday, and Seamon said people flocked to attend game weekend activities. “There was a lot of positive energy on campus,” he said.  Seven arrests were made in the Stadium, and one person was transported to the hospital due to alcohol consumption, the release said. Thirty-three people were removed from the Stadium for rule violations — mostly impairment or possession of alcohol. There were no citations for underage alcohol violations outside of the Stadium. “A man detained for public intoxication following a complaint of public indecency was transported to the hospital due to his high level of intoxication,” the release said. “This case will be forwarded to the prosecutor’s office for review of charges.” The tunnel in the Stadium is open again this football season for fans during Fridays before home games, Seamon said. More than 4,900 people walked through the gates and onto the field. A sold-out crowd of 82,000 witnessed the Irish season opener in the football stadium Saturday, Mike Seamon, director of Gameday Operations, said.  “We’re guessing we’ll break 100,000 people this weekend,” Seamon said. “The pedal cabs were a huge success,” he said.” They were run by on-campus clubs, and the profits go back to the clubs.” But attention has already turned to next week’s home game. Also available for the first time this season is transportation for those with walking difficulties, he said. Golf carts and pedal cabs are available, and more than 1,000 people took advantage of the golf cart rides. “People are happy and excited for the new era,” Seamon said. He said gameday.nd.edu will have schedules for all gameday events for the rest of the season. Next week’s highlights include a student march to the pep rally on the Irish Green, which is the only parade down Notre Dame Avenue in recent history. And the U.S. Army Black Daggers will be parachuting in with the game balls and flags. Seamon said more than 1,500 attended a luncheon Friday where Irish coach Brian Kelly and cornerback Darrin Walls spoke. Seamon said he is predicting even more attendees for this Friday’s luncheon before the  Michigan game.last_img read more

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Jessie Mueller Will Headline Waitress Musical at A.R.T.

first_img Star Files Broadway.com has confirmed that Tony winner Jessie Mueller, after starring as Jenna in a December workshop of the new Waitress musical, will reprise her performance in the previously announced premiere at Massachusetts’ American Repertory Theater. A.R.T. Artistic Director Diane Paulus will helm the production, which begins performances on August 1. The show features a score by Grammy nominee Sara Bareilles and a book by Jessie Nelson.“Sara’s music is exceptional,” the Beautiful alum recently told Broadway.com of the original score. “She’s been as involved in the process as the rest of us were. It was very refreshing to see her changing her work along with what we were doing—whether it was an acting moment that changed the lyric or vice versa.”As for the upcoming A.R.T. run, which begins rehearsals in June, Mueller says, “I’m sure there will be a lot of new things I don’t even know about yet, but that’s part of the fun. You show up and ask, ‘Where are we are now?’ and just go from there.”In addition to her Tony-winning performance as the titular singer/songwriter in Beautiful: The Carole King Musical, Mueller has appeared on Broadway in On a Clear Day You Can See Forever (for which she also received a Tony nod,) Nice Work If You Can Get It and The Mystery of Edwin Drood. Her additional credits include Into the Woods in Central Park and the New York Philharmonic’s Carousel.Waitress follows Jenna, a pregnant waitress in the south trapped in an abusive marriage and looking for a happy ending. She finds relief—and potentially that happy ending—by making creatively-titled pies and forming a romance with an unlikely newcomer. Additional casting will be revealed at a later date. View Comments Sara Bareilles Jessie Muellerlast_img read more

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Video Clips of the Week: The Dawn Wall

first_imgIt’s all over the news, from Rock and Ice to the New York Times – as of January 14, 2015, Tommy Caldwell and Kevin Jorgeson have officially completed their revolutionary free ascent of the Dawn Wall. 3000 feet, 32 pitches (seven of which are designated 5.14, the current highest rating in the climbing world), and 19 days made this trip to the summit the most difficult (and successful) rock climbing feat around the globe.The process has been years in the making, starting in 2007 when the two first began to outline the idea. This week, take a look at the journey that the Dawn Wall has inspired in Caldwell and Jorgeson. First, Caldwell shares some of his preparations for the Dawn Wall ascent. The second video shows a portion of the video diary that Caldwell and Jorgeson kept during their climb. Finally, learn a bit more about the climb as the third video breaks the Dawn Wall down into some pretty shocking numbers.last_img read more

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Taekwondo Team Selected To Compete In Military World Games

first_imgBy Dialogo April 05, 2011 I want be a part of the Army’s National Taekwondo Team. My name is Imar. I’m in the Cartagena Battalion BAFIM2. I want to be a part of the Army’s Taekwondo team. My name is Imar. I’m in the Cartagena Battalion BAFIM2. All-Army taekwondo athletes captured eight of ten weight classes contested at the Armed Forces/CISM Taekwondo Qualifier at Fort Indiantown Gap, PA. One Marine and one Air Force athlete won the two other weight classes at the event. The first-place finisher in each weight class qualified for the 2011 USA Taekwondo Senior National Championships to be conducted in early July in San Jose, Calif. The Armed Forces event was also used to select the team to participate in the 20th CISM (World Military) Taekwondo Championship that will be conducted mid-July at the 5th Military World Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.last_img read more

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Lawyers to fill top posts

first_imgFlorida lawyer/lawmakers have been named to some of the top positions in the state legislature for the next two years, following announcements by House Speaker Johnnie Byrd, R-Plant City, and Senate President Jim King, R-Jacksonville.Bryd, who is a lawyer, and King announced last month their committee assignments for the 2003-04 legislature.In the House, Rep. Dudley Goodlette, R-Naples, a former member of the Bar Board of Governors, has been named policy chair. In the position, he will oversee the policy initiatives of every committee of the lower chamber.Rep. Bruce Kyle, R-Ft. Myers, was named chair of the powerful Appropriations Committee, which determines how the state budget is put together.Of interest to the legal community, Rep. Joe Negron, R-Stuart, chairs the Appropriations Subcommittee on Judicial, while Rep. Gus Bilirakis, R-Palm Harbor, chairs the Subcommittee on Public Safety.Rep. Jeffrey Kottkamp, R-Cape Coral, was named chair of the Judiciary Committee, and Rep. Gustavo Barreiro, R-Miami, a nonlawyer, was named chair of the Public Safety and Crime Prevention Committee.In the Senate, King followed through on his promise to have both parties represented. Sen. Skip Campbell, D-Tamarac, a former member of the Bar Board of Governors, was chosen to head the Finance and Tax Committee, which will oversee any changes in the state’s taxing methods. That could be a particularly high profile position since the state expects to face a huge budget deficit, both in continuing programs and from the voter mandate to reduce the number of students in public school classrooms.Sen. Rod Smith, D-Gainesville, the former Eighth Circuit state attorney, was named the chair on the Appropriations Subcommittee on Article V Implementation and Judiciary. That panel will not only oversee the court system’s annual budget, but also the constitutionally mandated assumption by the state of more of the costs of county and circuit courts. The state is mandated by a 1998 constitutional amendment to pick up more of those expenses on July 1, 2004.Sen. Victor Crist, R-St. Petersburg, a nonlawyer but veteran of the Judiciary and Criminal Justice committees, was chosen as chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Criminal Justice.Sen. Alex Villalobos, R-Miami, was picked to chair the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Sen. Howard Futch, R-Indiatlantic, a nonlawyer, was picked to chair the Criminal Justice Committee.Sen. Burt Saunders, R-Naples, was named as chair of the Committee on Health, Aging, and Long-Term Care, which could have a vital role to play if efforts to change medical malpractice laws proceed. A gubernatorial task force is looking at the medical malpractice issue and is considering, among other proposals, recommending a cap on noneconomic damages. Lawyers to fill top posts January 15, 2003 Regular Newscenter_img Lawyers to fill top postslast_img read more

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BLOG: Skyrocketing Property Taxes Are Due to a Lack of Education Funding

first_imgRead more posts about Governor Wolf’s 2016-17 budget.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf By: Jeff Sheridan, Governor Wolf Press Secretary February 25, 2016 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img BLOG: Skyrocketing Property Taxes Are Due to a Lack of Education Funding Budget News,  Education,  The Blog Massive cuts at the state level and a lack of real investment in education is not only hurting school districts across Pennsylvania, but also having a devastating impact on middle-class families and seniors who can no longer afford to pay for the Republican property tax increases that have been passed down to local communities over the past several years.That is why Governor Wolf has been fighting since day one to secure historic increases in education funding at all levels, including K through 12 education.During his budget address, Governor Wolf said: “In the last year alone, 83 school districts increased property taxes above the index because Harrisburg didn’t produce a responsible budget… [and] another 175 school districts are contemplating additional tax increases this year – for the same reason…”The Post-Gazette last week rated this “mostly true” and the head of the Education Policy and Leadership Center said of Governor Wolf’s speech, “[The] overall message was absolutely correct.”Source: Post-GazetteAfter years of reckless Republican budgets that drastically cut education, were unbalanced, and created a multi-billion dollar deficit, school districts were forced to raise property taxes on hardworking middle-class families and seniors. And without the governor’s proposed historic investment in education, districts that are still reeling will once again be forced to raise property taxes even higher to make up for the state’s lack of investment.Despite this reality, some in the Republican Party argue that property tax increases are a result of pensions. However, this claim is categorically untrue.In fact, there is no form of pension reform that will provide the state or any district immediate budget relief after years of underfunding the system, which resulted in tens of billions of dollars of debt.This also ignores the reality of what happened when the previous governor and the Republican-controlled legislature made devastating cuts to education totaling $1 billion.After Governor Corbett was inaugurated in 2011, schools began to plan for the coming 2011-12 school year, not anticipating there would be massive budget cuts.Governor Corbett’s budget cuts passed in late June of 2011 – after many schools had passed their 2011 budgets.For the 2012 school year, they had to account for the new appropriations and cuts to education.These were cuts directly to classrooms, charter school reimbursements, and the educational assistance program. Devastating funding cuts were made to basic education funding and Accountability Block Grants – all of which went into the classroom.To make up for those cuts, districts had three options: cut programs, layoff educators, or increase property taxes. Given the Republican refusal to compromise with the governor’s proposal that would fix the deficit and increase funding to education, school districts are once again facing huge cuts and they will have no choice but to raise property taxes even higher.The Republican tax plan would quite simply result in billions of dollars in property tax hikes.last_img read more

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LEDO hires consultant for “State of Trails in Dearborn County”

first_imgLawrenceburg, IN—A new partnership is a big step toward the improvement and creation of trails within Dearborn County and their connection into neighboring counties.One Dearborn, the local economic development organization (LEDO) for Dearborn County, has contracted with county resident Jack Sutton to conduct a “State of Trails in Dearborn County” report in 2020.“Having a strong network of multi-use trails that connect people and communities will ensure Dearborn County remains a great place to live, work & play. I look forward to working with One Dearborn and our community leaders in planning for the future,” says Sutton.Sutton brings a high level of expertise in enhancing outdoor recreation and preserving natural resources in the Cincinnati region. He retired as the chief executive officer of the award-winning Great Parks of Hamilton County in May 2019 following a career which began with the public park system in 1989. Prior to serving as CEO, he held positions including park planner, planning director, and deputy director. The foundational “State of Trails in Dearborn County” report will give Dearborn County’s local governments, as well as non-profits and businesses with interests in trails, a common document from which to continue and enhance their trails planning and implementation efforts. It may also become the first step toward the development of a Comprehensive Trails Master Plan for Dearborn County. Having such a master plan in place would allow those entities to check off a key qualification for obtaining grant funding.last_img read more

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Amazon Warriors, Digicel spread CPL cheer with Diamond Special Needs School

first_imgCHILDREN from the Diamond Special Needs School were in awe today, thanks to Digicel, after spending some quality time with the players and staff of the Guyana Amazon Warriors cricket franchise. “This event is not new. We’ve been doing this throughout the CaribbeanWicketkeeper-batsman Chadwick Walton shares a ‘selfie’ moment with a few children from the Diamond Special Needs School.and wherever Digicel markets are and where cricket is being played,” said Digicel manager Vidya Sanichara. At the Marriott Hotel, the Amazon Warriors took time to interact, sign autographs and also engaged in a friendly game of cricket with the children of the Diamond Special Needs School.“Some of them have never been to the Marriott, some of them have never been to cricket or met the players. So today we’re bringing Digicel and the players a little closer to them,” Sanichara told reporters. She further explained that Digicel has been “partnering with Special Needs for a number of years, and that’s something very close to our hearts. We also worked with the Diamond Special Needs School in the past”. Rayad Emrit, the Amazon Warriors’ right-arm fast-medium bowler expressed his delight, and that of his teammates, at being able to bring smiles to their fans, calling it a “special moment” for them as a team.last_img read more

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Redemption for A-Rod long gone

first_imgRemember the days when 40 home runs and 120 RBIs were enough? Remember when no one cared when you hit home runs, just as long as you hit them? Remember when Alex Rodriguez played for the Mariners and Rangers and was considered the best baseball player of our era?Those days are long gone for A-Rod, because in New York, it’s not enough to be a great player — you have to be great when the fans decide you ought to be. In the Big Apple, that means two things — do it against the Red Sox and do it in the playoffs, and if you don’t … the hell with you.A-Rod has found this out the hard way in his first three years in pinstripes, and as the playoffs get closer, the two-time MVP could find himself booed out of town.So why have Yankee fans never embraced such a great player playing on the biggest stage? The answer is a complex one, and it all began the day Alex Rodriguez became a Yankee.A-Rod joined the Yanks prior to the 2004 season — one year after Aaron Boone’s Game 7 walk-off home run prolonged the “Curse of the Bambino.” But that season did not have the fairy-tale ending most baseball fans would have expected. The “little Marlins that could” deep-fried the Yankees in six games, prolonging the Yankees championship drought to a whole three seasons — that’s about 30 years in Yankee years.In 2004, the A-Rod era began. With the best player in the game joining All-Stars like Derek Jeter, Gary Sheffield, Hideki Matsui and Mariano Rivera, the elusive 27th championship appeared to be all but won. But the Yankees did not win the World Series that year, nor did A-Rod live up to expectations.Everyone knows the old adage that your first season in pinstripes is typically not an easy one. It happened to Roger Clemens, Jason Giambi and Randy Johnson (apparently he needs two seasons and counting to adjust, but that’s beside the point). No one in New York thought A-Rod would go through a similar adjustment period — but that’s exactly what happened.In 1998, Rodriguez had the worst statistical year of his career since he became the A-Rod we all know and love. His 36 home runs and 106 RBIs were his lowest totals in seven seasons.But in New York, a good postseason can change all of that — unless, that is, you happen to be part of the biggest choke job in sports history. A-Rod’s 2004 postseason numbers are not bad at all. In the divisional series against Minnesota, A-Rod batted .421 with a home run and three RBIs.Then in the championship series, he batted .258 with two round-trippers and five RBIs. But all that is an afterthought in the minds of Yankee fans, because all they remember is A-Rod’s infamous slap on Bronson Arroyo while trying to beat out a groundball in Game 6. Unfortunately for A-Rod, he became the face of the biggest choke in sports history — and that will never in a million years be forgotten by Yankee fans.In 2005, it seemed A-Rod was back on track and on his way to rewriting the record books. Rodriguez took the struggling Yankees under his wing and carried them to the postseason, en route to his second MVP award — and it finally seemed as though he was officially a Yankee. But in New York, just like you can erase a bad year with a good postseason, you can also erase a phenomenal regular season with a horrific postseason. A-Rod’s .133 average and zero-RBI performance in last year’s ALDS has landed him in the Yankee fan’s dog house — and he has yet to get out.This season, A-Rod’s struggles have been well-documented by sports talk shows, tabloids and almost every media outlet known to man. ESPN’s Baseball Tonight went as far as deciding that the Yankees were planning to trade A-Rod, even though no such rumors had ever surfaced.A-Rod has heard the boo-birds all season long in the house that Ruth built, and he will continue to do so until he lives up to the sky-scraping expectations of Yankee fans.A-Rod is the highest-paid player in all of sports, and this season he is slated to make a cool $25 million again, roughly $150,000 per game, and for that much money, it is not enough to be great, you have to be the best.While Rodriguez’s numbers this year are nothing to sneeze at, they are far from the best. Rodriguez has the 19th most home runs in the major leagues and his 106 RBIs rank 14th. Players like Albert Pujols, Ryan Howard, Travis Hafner and David Ortiz are having far superior offensive seasons compared to A-Rod’s — and that is not OK in the eyes of Yankee fans.Not only does A-Rod have to combat the wrath of angry Yankee fans, but day in and day out, he must listen to comparisons between himself and the prince of New York, Derek Jeter. A-Rod, a former Gold Glove winner at shortstop, switched positions to accommodate Jeter, and he has yet to emerge from underneath the captain’s shadow.Jeter has won four championships with the Yankees, and he defines what it means to be an athlete in New York. D.J. is media-savvy, fan-friendly and has a knack for coming through in the clutch — all things A-Rod is not. Yankee fans have made it nearly impossible for Rodriguez to succeed by constantly comparing him to one of the greatest athletes in New York sports history.Finally, A-Rod has never been accepted in New York because to Yankee fans, he is just another high-priced player on a team full of All-Stars. In Texas and Seattle (post-Griffey Jr.), A-Rod was the only player those teams had. But in Yankee Stadium, fans look out at Monument Park and see names like Ruth, Gehrig, DiMaggio and Berra. They look on field and see past World Series champions and future Hall-of-Famers like Jeter, Rivera, and manager Joe Torre. To Yankee fans, A-Rod is just another great player who has yet to help the Yankees win a championship.However, the $25 million man is starting to earn his paycheck as of late, batting .423 with five home runs and 10 RBIs in his last seven games. But unfortunately for A-Rod, he’s only one 0-4 day away from hearing the boos at Yankee Stadium.If you haven’t figured it out yet, I am a Yankee fan myself. A spoiled baseball fan who has had the privilege of watching my team win four World Series while growing up in the city of New York.But I have never booed A-Rod, and I never will. I believe he’s held to too high of a standard and as long as fans keep booing him, more strikeouts and throwing errors are going to be seen.So what will it take for A-Rod to win over the hearts of Yankee fans? A championship would help — but he has to hit a walk-off home run in Game 7 of the World Series … against the Red Sox, of course.Andrew is a junior from New York City. Share your thoughts about A-Rod at akluger@badgerherald.com.last_img read more

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Legacies: Lessons learned by former editors in chief

first_img“Very rarely, especially as a young reporter, do you ever get to witness the entire production of a newspaper.”Joanna Lin served as editor in chief in fall 2007. She is now a reporter for the California Watch.“It’s really valuable to learn to write on real deadlines. When you don’t turn in a story in your journalism class, you might get an F. If you don’t turn in a [Daily Trojan] story, there is a big gaping hole in the paper, and that is not acceptable.”Elisa Ung served as editor in chief in fall 1998. She now reviews restaurants for the Record in New Jersey.“One of the hardest things [about working for USC Student Publications] is really learning to resist the temptation to get too involved. One of our big goals here in our office is to leave the Daily Trojan as open and student-operated as possible and let the students learn from the experience as I learned from that experience.”Scott Smith served as editor in chief in spring 2001. He is now the associate director of USC Student Publications.“I think about the Daily Trojan probably on a daily basis, planning that [journalism] class. I think a lot about Mona and how she operated as an adviser. I think about her, and I think about the DT every day and in every plan. I have all the newspapers from when I was editor in a three-ring binder.”Brian Reed served as editor in chief in fall 2004. He now teaches English and journalism at Animo Pat Brown High School in Los Angeles.“One of the biggest things when I think of the Daily Trojan was all the prep we did for the ’84 Olympic Games. … We had reporters that had the Olympic Committee on speed dial; they knew us by our first names.”Jeff Tylicki was editor in chief in fall 1985. He is now the advertising manager for USC Student Publications. “The daily grind, being a part of it, being in the mix every day, sort of prepared me for the real world when I started doing this. Basically, the real-life experience you got from working in a real newsroom, an independent newsroom with similarly minded colleagues who wanted to ferret out the truth and write the good stories and cover their university as best they could — it was a great experience.”Nick Divito served as editor in chief in spring 1996. He now freelances and works part time for Courthouse News Service in Las Vegas. In 100 years of production, the Daily Trojan has seen numerous notable editors in chief, from Olympic athletes to Los Angeles Times editors to the former chairman of the Times Mirror Co.While some editors, such as Jeff Tylicki, covered the Olympics, others competed in the Games.Charles Paddock served as the Daily Trojan’s eighth editor in chief in 1920-21, but he had already achieved fame as a track and field athlete at the 1920 Olympics in Antwerp, Belgium. He won gold medals in the 100-meter race and 4 x 100-meter relay as well as silver in the 200-meter race.“[He] was not only the fastest runner at USC but he was known as ‘The Fastest Human in the World’ after winning a gold medal in the 1920 Olympics,” said Frank Sotomayor, adviser to the DT.Photo courtesy of El RodeoPaddock also competed in the 1924 and 1928 Olympic Games and was featured in the film “Chariots of Fire.” He served in the Marine Corps during World War II and was killed in an air crash in Alaska in 1943.Many former editors went on to work at the Los Angeles Times, mixing generations of DT alumni, from 1970 Editor in Chief Roger Smith to 2010 Editor in Chief Kate Mather.Robert Erburu, who served as editor in chief in 1951-52, became the chairman of the Times Mirror Co. in 1986. At the time, the company owned eight newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times.He remained involved in USC, serving as founding board chairman of the Pacific Council on International Policy, but has since retired. In 2005, the university announced the endowed Robert F. Erburu Chair in Ethics, Globalization and Development.The DT has served as a training ground for hundreds of journalists who have gone on to distinguished careers, such as humor writer Art Buchwald.Buchwald attended USC in the late 1940s, studying journalism and writing columns for the DT. He dropped out before finishing his journalism degree and moved to Paris, where he was a correspondent for Variety. In 1962, he began writing a political satire column, which earned him the nickname the “Wit of Washington” and gained him fame as it appeared in more than 500 newspapers nationwide.In the 1980s, he established the Art Buchwald Scholarship, which is awarded for humor writing to a student on April Fool’s Day.In 1993, USC awarded him an honorary doctorate.Many former editors who went on to careers beyond journalism, from business to law to education, said their time at the DT taught them invaluable lessons about writing, reporting and decision-making that they still use today:“The Daily Trojan was exactly like the professional newspapers surrounding the campus. It was like working in the real world of journalism. In Southern California, most of the people working on newspapers either had not gone to school or had gone to USC School of Journalism. It was one grand family.”Joe Saltzman served as editor in chief during the 1960-61 academic year. He is now the director of the Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture and a professor of journalism at Annenberg.“I practically lived in that building, in the newsroom, for months, weeks on end. … Among other things, it was just a heck of a lot of fun. Aside from seriously having a chance to learn the craft, it was also just a tremendously fulfilling experience because you’re working with these energetic and often terribly funny people.”Steve Padilla served as editor in chief in spring 1982. He is now an assistant national editor at the Los Angeles Times.  “The most important thing I learned was that ultimately, the big decisions lay with me and I had to trust myself on them. Obviously there was always pushback from certain student groups who felt they were being covered unfairly, but even I had professors trying to get me fired or expelled for covering them. But I tried to just tell myself and my staff that if we were being fair and working hard, we would land on our feet, and we did.”Sara Libby served as editor in chief in fall 2005. She is now transitioning from being an associate editor at Talking Points Memo to managing editor at Voice of San Diego.“You can be an editor at a lot of college papers, but when you work at the Daily Trojan, the chance for you to cover truly high-profile things and compete with high-profile outlets is something that is completely unique to working for the student newspaper at USC. Personally, my favorite part is my best friends were the people I met through the paper. You combine this atmosphere of learning and thinking on your feet and you get to do it every single day with people that are life-long friends.”Kate Mather served as editor in chief in fall 2010. She is now a writer for the Los Angeles Times. “I learned a lot about how big of an impact a newspaper can have in a community and that can never be taken lightly, that you’re sort of the mirror for the community, and it’s important to treat that with respect and care.”Jennifer Mir, then Jennifer Hamm, was editor in chief in fall 1997. She is now the director of practice and development at Munger Tolles & Olson LLP.last_img read more

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