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Seven arrests made over football weekend

first_img Police also made several arrests on campus, with one man stopped on campus outside the Stadium for public intoxication, according to a statement issued by Phil Johnson, director of Notre Dame Security Police. For the next home game, the Notre Dame Cycling club, women’s water polo club and Notre Dame ROTC will be operating the pedal cabs. “When you have the teams within driving distance, you have larger crowds,” he said. Friday night’s drummer’s circle saw a large attendance also, he said. Seamon estimated 3,000 fans showed up. An estimated 95,000 people were on campus Saturday, and Seamon said people flocked to attend game weekend activities. “There was a lot of positive energy on campus,” he said.  Seven arrests were made in the Stadium, and one person was transported to the hospital due to alcohol consumption, the release said. Thirty-three people were removed from the Stadium for rule violations — mostly impairment or possession of alcohol. There were no citations for underage alcohol violations outside of the Stadium. “A man detained for public intoxication following a complaint of public indecency was transported to the hospital due to his high level of intoxication,” the release said. “This case will be forwarded to the prosecutor’s office for review of charges.” The tunnel in the Stadium is open again this football season for fans during Fridays before home games, Seamon said. More than 4,900 people walked through the gates and onto the field. A sold-out crowd of 82,000 witnessed the Irish season opener in the football stadium Saturday, Mike Seamon, director of Gameday Operations, said.  “We’re guessing we’ll break 100,000 people this weekend,” Seamon said. “The pedal cabs were a huge success,” he said.” They were run by on-campus clubs, and the profits go back to the clubs.” But attention has already turned to next week’s home game. Also available for the first time this season is transportation for those with walking difficulties, he said. Golf carts and pedal cabs are available, and more than 1,000 people took advantage of the golf cart rides. “People are happy and excited for the new era,” Seamon said. He said gameday.nd.edu will have schedules for all gameday events for the rest of the season. Next week’s highlights include a student march to the pep rally on the Irish Green, which is the only parade down Notre Dame Avenue in recent history. And the U.S. Army Black Daggers will be parachuting in with the game balls and flags. Seamon said more than 1,500 attended a luncheon Friday where Irish coach Brian Kelly and cornerback Darrin Walls spoke. Seamon said he is predicting even more attendees for this Friday’s luncheon before the  Michigan game.last_img read more

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Lyons hosts 17th 5k Mara Fox Run

first_img Buddie and Miller contacted alumni and businesses to further support this cause. With alumni donations, funds gained from race registration and sponsorships from several companies, Buddie said more than $3,000 was raised. These companies included Chipotle, Between the Buns, Outback Steakhouse and Luna Bars. PILLARS, a group on campus aimed at increasing alcohol awareness, and the Office of International Studies also worked to honor Fox’s memory by promoting the event. McCarthy said she is grateful to all participants, but especially Lyons rector Denise McOsker, who has helped continue the event every year. “I appreciate PILLARS coming in, and these young women putting in the amount of work that goes into this,” she said. “But I want to really thank Denise. She’s been a very happy, faithful person all this time.” The race itself was a 5k that stretched down South Quad, wound around Saint Mary’s and St. Joseph lakes and ended under the Lyons arch, a symbolic touch added by the co-commissioners this year. There was also a Fun Walk for non-runners. The male winners were seniors Michael Hogan, Evan Possley and Matthew Zak. The top females were senior Laura Lindsley, sophomore Alison Podlaski and senior Caroline Green. The top finishers from Lyons included freshman Meredith Houska and senior Katie Sample. Leading up to the race, McCarthy gave a speech in the Coleman-Morse lounge on Friday night about what happened to her daughter. Buddie also said Lyons sponsored a dance in the Monogram Room at the Joyce Athletic and Convocation Center. “The speech was fantastic,” Buddie said. “We’ve never had this before, and it was just a beautiful talk on what happened to Mara and why it’s important to run this race.” Every year, Fox’s family and friends come to the race. McCarthy said this year about 20 people came, and she said Fox would appreciate the cause her name has inspired. “Mara is with us here today. Her memory lives on, and for a good cause,” she said. “I know she would be pleased with that.” What started out as a chilly morning broke into an interlude of sunshine just long enough for the runners to weave their way around the 5k Mara Fox course Saturday. Over 300 people participated in the 17th annual Mara Fox Run sponsored by Lyons Hall, event co-commissioners Melissa Buddie and Erika Miller said. During this brief burst of warmth, runners and volunteers gathered to celebrate the life of Mara Fox, a freshman in Lyons Hall who was killed by a drunk driver on Nov. 13, 1993. Coming to Notre Dame from northern Virginia, Fox intended to study as a psychology and Spanish double major. The money raised from the run goes toward a scholarship that supports students to study abroad in Toledo, Spain, where Fox had dreamed of traveling, Fox’s mother Teresa McCarthy said. “We’re now sending a minimum of two students each spring,” she said. “One year we sent three.” Each applicant must write an essay about how they embody Fox’s characteristics and how they would help others while abroad. McCarthy said Fox instinctively knew she wanted to help others. “Eventually, when Mara got her degree she wanted to work with children in the Hispanic community,” she said. Pointing to her heart, McCarthy continued, “She just had this great love for people, and she knew it right from here.”last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s play to honor former College president

first_imgThis spring, Saint Mary’s Center for Spirituality (CFS) will sponsor the 2014 Spring Lecture series “Witnesses to the Love of God: The Leadership of Catholic Women Religious,” which will feature scholars from across the nation throughout March 6 to April 8.The lectures will be complemented by an original play memorializing the life of Sister Madeleva Wolff, Gwen O’Brien, Saint Mary’s director of media relations said.“Sister Madeleva was a visionary, an educator, a medieval scholar, a poet and a woman of deep spiritual conviction,” O’Brien said. “In her 27 years as president she put those gifts to good use leading Saint Mary’s to national prominence as a premier Catholic liberal arts college.”This season marks the 50th anniversary of Wolff’s death. In preparation for the semi-centennial, students in associate professor of English Laura Haigwood’s writing proficiency course last semester wrote essays about the life of the College’s former president.The College’s drama department will also contribute to the lectures’ commemoration of Wolff’s life. Susan Baxter, a senior lecturer in communication studies, asked her students to write dramatic monologues about Wolff, which she used to create a 90-minute play, O’Brien said.“I am so grateful to Laura Haigwood and Susan Baxter for their tremendous work on this project,” CFS director Elizabeth Groppe said. “Susan in particular has spent many long hours on the play composition and production.”Baxter also drew heavily from memories submitted by alumnae, actual quotes from Wolff and research by Gail Porter Mandell, a Wolff biographer and professor emerita of humanistic studies, O’Brien said.“Gail Porter Mandell writes in her biography, ‘Madeleva: One Woman’s Life,’ that Sister Madeleva would never have developed her many gifts without the example of the female role models she found in the convent, the literary world and the Catholic tradition,” Groppe said.This year’s lecture series intertwines the College’s historic example of women’s leadership with that of contemporary religious female figures.“The play, ‘Madeleva: A Play in Several Voices,’ will bring Sister Madeleva to life for a new generation of young women, for whom she is a model of a woman of prayer who surmounted many challenges to become a distinguished scholar, poet, educator and leader in both Catholic higher education and the life of religious communities of women,” Groppe said.The play will take place Thursday, March 20, at 7 p.m. in O’Laughlin Auditorium. Tickets will be free for Saint Mary’s, Notre Dame, Holy Cross, Indiana University South Bend and Bethel College’s students, faculty and staff. Otherwise, tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for senior citizens.Tags: arts, lecture, Madeleva Wolff, saint mary’s, Saint Mary’s College, SMC, Theatrelast_img read more

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Hesburgh Library Edit-a-Thon highlights historic gender gap in South Bend

first_imgThe Hesburgh Library’s Center for Digital Scholarship hosted its first ever Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon to highlight the gap between male and female contributors on the site and to shed light on the historical impact of South Bend women.The Edit-a-Thon, an event open to Notre Dame as well as the wider South Bend community, taught participants how to edit and contribute articles with a focus on prominent South Bend women.Kai Smith, a visiting librarian and one of the organizers for the event, said Wikipedia’s platform provided people with the opportunity to both examine the systemic disparity between men and women prevalent in historical study and explore the wealth of prominent figures in South Bend. Although Wikipedia is an online platform with near-universal opportunity for access to those with Internet, the site displays a noticeable gender gap, with only 13 percent of contributors and editors being women.“It addresses the larger gender gap issue that Wikipedia has of not having many women editors,” Smith said. “It encourages people to not only add female figures to Wikipedia, but also to kind of bridge that gender gap.”As part of the Edit-a-Thon, participants “adopted” a South Bend woman by researching her life, work and legacy in online databases such as University Archives. Smith said as she and other Notre Dame and South Bend librarians compiled a list of South Bend women to research, she discovered the wealth of prominent female scholars, activists and community leaders who contributed to South Bend’s history. Prominent women included community leaders such as Eugenia Braboy and Helen Pope, religious leaders like Sister Maura Brannick and Sister Mary di Pazzi Rockford and educators such as Gloria Kaufman and Dr. Virgina Calvin.“There’s pretty amazing people here, and I must say, I was really surprised at the community activism there is,” Smith said. “Even in the founding of Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame, a lot of the sisters were very active in the community and the creation of institutions. It’s pretty phenomenal.”In order to help participants get started, Smith held several introductory workshops on guidelines for properly starting, editing and citing Wikipedia pages, a process she said is relatively straightforward.Fellow organizer and librarian Sheila Smyth said South Bend libraries have fostered similar initiatives and hoped the event would become a recurring event.“I hope it becomes a tradition for Women’s History Month and that it becomes something even public schools can get into,” Smyth said.Several participants, such as first-year law student Carlene Miller said the event helped shed light on the important role women in South Bend played in community activism. Miller, who focused her research on community activist and healthcare professional Helen Pope, said the Edit-a-Thon gave her the opportunity to explore the achievements of other women in the South Bend area.“It’s good to see the list of women and see that there’s this long history and tradition of female activism and community activism of women in South Bend,” Miller said.Fellow first-year law student Christine Bannan said the event helped her understand the importance of contributing to history through online technology and provided an opportunity to both engage with South Bend history and draw attention to social gender bias.“It made me think about other causes of the gender gap in society,” Bannan said. “Wikipedia is free, it’s public, it’s open access, yet we still have that huge disparity between men and women editing, and it draws attention to the fact that there are more systemic causes.”Tags: Notre Dames, South Bend Women, Talk it Out Tuesday, Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon, Women’s History Monthlast_img read more

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Former dean Hofman dies at 94

first_imgEmil T. Hofman, a professor emeritus of chemistry and former dean of the First Year of Studies who was described as “legendary,” died Saturday, according to a University press release. He was 94.“Emil Hofman, a legendary professor who influenced the lives of generations of students at Notre Dame, was a demanding but caring professor, a dedicated administrator and a man of faith. In many ways, he embodied the spirit of Notre Dame,” University president Fr. John Jenkins said in the release. “My prayers are with his family as we both mourn his passing and celebrate his life and legacy.”Hofman taught freshman level chemistry for 40 years, from 1950 to 1990, totaling more than 32,000 students. Hofman became the dean of what was then the Freshman Year of Studies, and helped oversee the transition to coeducation and the implementation of a comprehensive first-year curriculum that allowed students to explore their interests before choosing a major.He was born in 1921 in Paterson, New Jersey, and served in the Air Force in World War II before using the GI Bill to finance his education at Catholic University and the University of Miami (Fla.), according to the release.Hofman earned a master’s degree from Notre Dame in 1953 and a doctoral degree in 1963, along with an honorary degree in 1990. For nearly 20 years following his retirement in 1990, he would hold “office hours” on a bench outside the Main Building before and after daily mass at the Basilica of the Sacred Heart, according to the release.Tags: chemistry, Emil Hofman, First Year of Studies, FYSlast_img read more

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Author examines language of nuclear destruction

first_imgArthur Binard, a bilingual author, translator and antinuclear activist, delivered a lecture Monday afternoon in the LaFortune Center Ballroom that examined the terminology Japanese and Americans use to describe the bombings of Japan during World War II. At the end of the war, there was a general feeling of euphoria in the United States, but in Japan, the feeling could not have been more different — Hiroshima and Nagasaki were leveled by nuclear weapons, and the Japanese people dealt with the crippling effects of the destruction of two large cities.Binard, who has lived in Japan for more than 20 years, said he set about to discover how the language both the American and Japanese people use in discussing this event shape their perspective on the event itself. The interest started for Binard with a trip to the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, he said, and a talk from a survivor of the atomic bomb.When describing the bomb, Binard said the survivor used the word “pika,” a word which roughly translated to “shiny” or “bright,” to describe the explosion. Binard said he had never heard this word before and, “pika gave a strong sense of the event.”As a result of describing the bomb in terms of light, and not as the mushroom cloud with which he had traditionally associated it, Binard said he began questioning the narrative of the bombing that he had been taught in school. Using the mushroom cloud as the main descriptor of the bomb has profoundly impacted Americans’ views of the event, as they are detached from the destruction itself, he said. “Using the mushroom cloud puts us above [the incident],” Binard said. “[In Japan,] nobody talked about the mushroom cloud.”Binard said he discovered that the Japanese almost exclusively used “pika” in describing the bombing, and this new narrative, not of the necessity of the bomb but the destruction that it created, made Binard shift his perspective on the use of the bomb. “I should have been with them all along,” Binard said, “but I wasn’t before because I didn’t have ‘pika.’” This discovery led Binard to further examine how the use of language impacts our view of the nuclear bomb and nuclear power. In his examination, Binard said he found examples in both Japan and the United States where the use of language seemed seemed to tame, in the minds of the general population, the negative effects of the nuclear bomb and nuclear power.According to Binard, the language used to describe an event impacts public perception of the event and when examining an event, one must alway consider how it is described.“All the language you use always has some perspective,” he said.Tags: Hiroshima, japan, Poetrylast_img read more

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McGlinn Hall benefactor dies

first_imgUniversity trustee emeritus and benefactor of McGlinn Hall Terrence J. McGlinn died Sept. 12, the University announced in a press release Thursday. McGlinn was 77.In addition to serving as a member of the Board of Trustees, McGlinn was also a University Fellow, a member of the advisory council for the Mendoza College of Business and a Notre Dame graduate of the class of 1962. According to the press release, the University presented McGlinn with an honorary degree in 2004 for combining “his 50 years of personal perspective on Notre Dame with sharply honed professional expertise” to benefit Notre Dame.“Terry was a beloved member of the Notre Dame family, a wise and trusted adviser and a generous benefactor,” University President Fr. John Jenkins said in the press release. “We mourn his passing, and we hold Bobbie, their children, other family members and his many friends in our prayers.”McGlinn rector Sister Mary Lynch said McGlinn remained committed to McGlinn Hall and its residents since the hall’s opening.“Terry McGlinn loved the women of McGlinn, and was always excited to hear any news about the things we did and the accomplishments that we achieved, and was absolutely very generous to us,” she said. “I mean everybody here always remembers his Christmas gifts every year.”In addition to being the hall’s benefactor, Lynch said McGlinn was also a true friend.“I used to enjoy just talking to him — and we could talk for 40 minutes to an hour about all kinds of things,” she said. “He was always excited to hear that we had won the Kelly Cup, and also any of the teams that would reach the championship points or whatever. He was always thrilled to hear about that, as well as the other accomplishments — sports weren’t just the only thing.”McGlinn’s effort to be involved in the hall community made an impact on the dorm, Lynch said.“He always made a strong connection with us,” she said. “That, to me, was significant. How much he connected and wanted to know and wanted to hear about what we were doing.”Outside of Notre Dame, McGlinn was a general partner of the private investment partnership Walnut Street Associates, worked with several other limited partnerships and was generous with his philanthropic work, according to the press release.McGlinn is survived by his wife, Barbara (Bobbie), and their four children — all of whom are Notre Dame graduates, according to the press release.McGlinn’s family will receive friends at Kuhn Funeral Home in West Reading, Pennsylvania, on Sunday from 4 to 7 p.m., according to the press release, and the funeral will be at St. Ignatius Loyola Church on Monday at 10 a.m.Sports Editor Elizabeth Greason contributed to this report.Tags: McGlinn Halllast_img read more

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Over 1,000 students, faculty march through Washington for ‘March for Life’

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of Maria Gardner Notre Dame students march down Constitution Avenue in Washington, D.C. during the 2018 March for Life.The students were in Arlington, just across the Potomac from the nation’s capital, to participate in the 2018 March for Life.The event, which has been held every year since 1974, was launched to combat the landmark Supreme Court ruling in Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion.This year students sponsored by Notre Dame’s Right to Life Club packed into 19 chartered buses for a 12-hour overnight journey to Washington to participate.The journey was anything but easy, Dunbar said.“Our bus’ engine kept shutting off and losing power steering and we had to keep veering off to the side of the highway,” she said. “We were able to get everyone there and redistribute people onto busses with seats.”The “whirlwind” journey didn’t end there junior Maria Gardner said, as the students, faculty and staff arrived in Washington at 5:30 a.m., long before St. Agnes opened their doors for mass.“All 1,000 of us divided ourselves up and went to 16 different McDonald’s Restaurants in the area … and waited there for an hour or two,” she said.Once the students had congregated back at St. Agnes — one of three parishes in Arlington where students slept in sleeping bags during their nights away from Notre Dame — Jenkins said mass for all the students.Gardner said Jenkins’ homily, delivered just before students headed to the march, was particularly inspiring.“[Jenkins] said, ‘we march not only for a change of laws but a change of hearts,’” she said “ … to change people’s hearts and show the value each human should have, that was my main takeaway.”After mass, the students loaded back onto the buses to make their way to the National Mall where they joined hundreds of thousands of other pro-life activists to march towards the Supreme Court.Before the march began, the activists were addressed via a live-streamed video by President Trump and Vice President Pence and in person by Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, all of whom threw their support behind the marchers.Junior Cliff Djajapranata said he found Ryan’s speech particularly compelling.“Ryan talked about how inspiring it was to see young people at the March for Life, which is something that really inspires me,” he said. “I think most young people are stereotypically pro-choice … I didn’t really grow up with friends that were pro-life … so seeing that youth and enthusiasm around the pro-life movement is something that inspires me everyday.” After the speeches, the crowds set off on their march. Djajapranata, who was attending the event for the first time, said he was amazed by the size of the crowds.“There was a little incline on the road and I remember looking back and you can’t see the end of the people,” he said.The ability to be around so many people holding similar beliefs was exciting for junior Matt Connell, the vice president of communications for Right to Life.“So many people realize in this movement that we’re not alone … fighting to promote a culture of life,” he said.Connell said he thought the march had a new energy this year thanks to recent legislative accomplishments by the pro-life movement.“The march, and the bringing together of so many pro-life people, encourages people when they are voting to keep in mind the issue of abortion and making sure they’re voting for pro-life candidates,” he said.For Gardener the event was successful not only because of its impact, but because of the happiness it brought all involved.“It’s just such a joyful experience,” she said. “Everyone is singing and dancing and just really celebrating life.”Tags: Father John Jenkins, March for Life, Right to Life, Washington DC Growing up in the suburbs of Washington, D.C., junior Julia Dunbar had been to St. Agnes Parish in Arlington, Virginia, to compete in various sporting events throughout her childhood, but she had never seen it as filled as she did Friday morning when scores of Notre Dame students packed into the pews for a mass presided over by University President Fr. John Jenkins.“It was really loud and thunderous prayer in the church because there are 1,000 Notre Dame kids,” Dunbar said. “I think the mass was just a really beautiful way to start the day even if you were tired, it was actually recharging.”last_img read more

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Notre Dame students travel to Trump rally in Elkhart

first_imgOn Nov. 8, 2016, Donald Trump was elected President of the United States, thanks in part to a 19-percentage point victory over Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in Indiana. Indiana is also the home of his running mate and now-vice president, Mike Pence, the former Governor of Indiana.On Thursday, Trump and Pence returned to to Indiana to kick off midterm campaigning in the state, with each man delivering a speech at a rally held at North Side Middle School in Elkhart.While Trump discussed his victory in Indiana throughout his speech, over the course of the rally he also spoke about some of the state’s unique institutions.“It’s the state that gave us Notre Dame football,” he said. Ann Curtis | The Observer United States President Donald Trump addresses a crowd of supporters at North Side Middle School in Elkhart on Thursday. Trump spoke on local election races throughout Indiana.Trump and Pence are no strangers to the University, having both spoke in the region since the 2016 campaign for the White House.In May 2016, Trump held a campaign rally at the Century Center in South Bend in the lead up to that year’s Indiana presidential primary, while Pence delivered the University’s 2017 commencement address.Pence spoke prior to Trump, giving an overview of the president’s accomplishments to date. Pence said that the president’s work on the economy has benefited not only the entire country, but also Elkhart specifically. “President Trump’s leadership has been making a difference here in Indiana and all across the country everyday,” Pence said. “Since Indiana voted to send him to the White House, businesses created more than 3.1 million jobs, including 33,000 new jobs here in the Hoosier state alone. … In fact, there has been 8,000 new good-paying manufacturing jobs just here in Elkhart, Indiana.“I say with absolute confidence, jobs are coming back … and under President Trump, America is coming back,” Pence said. While Pence and Trump both spoke on the administration’s political accomplishments, they also took time to address this November’s upcoming midterm elections. Trump said that his supporters must fight the urge to get “complacent.” “[Democrats] fight for all of the things that we don’t stand for, and we are going to have a great victory in ‘18, you watch,” Trump said. “History shows that when you win the presidency, three years later … 90 percent of the time, the party that wins the presidency loses on the midterms. And the reason is, I guess, they get a little bit complacent. We’re not getting complacent.” President Trump also discussed the May 8 Indiana primary, endorsing Republican senate candidate Mike Braun. Braun is challenging incumbent Democratic Senator Joe Donnelly in Indiana’s senate election this November. “We need Mike Braun in the Senate,” Trump said. “Now if Joe Donnelly — Sleepin’ Joe — and the Democrats get back into power, remember what I said, they will raise your taxes. … They will destroy your jobs, and they are going to knock the hell out of your borders.”Trump noted that while the gymnasium can host around 7,000 guests, there were still crowds outside of the venue, unable to get a spot inside. “I don’t know if you see what’s going on outside, but you have a lot of people outside that want to get in,” Trump said. “But they’re not getting in, because this place is packed.”Notre Dame students were among attendees at the rally and at a nearby counter-protest.Sophomore Indy Talken was one of the attendees who was unable to get a seat to watch Trump speak.Talken traveled to the rally with a group of friends. The students had reserved tickets online and arrived at the time they were told would guarantee them seating. However, when they went to take a shuttle to the rally, they were turned away.“The people on the bus told us ‘Don’t even bother going, there’s 20,000 people waiting outside just to get in. The venue is packed already, you don’t stand a chance,’ which was a little disappointing because we had reserved tickets online beforehand,” she said. “But we understand that’s how these kinds of things go.”Talken said she and her friends had hoped to attend the rally in order to learn more about contemporary political issues.“We were hoping to see him talk and listen to the way he presented issues because it’s important to be open-minded politically,” she said. “Being open to discussion is the only way to make progress. And we wanted first-hand experience.”Senior Liam Maher participated in a counter-rally in Elkhart. He said the protest highlighted a wide array of issues.“It was just a really diverse group on the counter protest side,” he said. “We had people including myself representing LGBTQIA populations, we had African American populations, we had Latinx populations, we had Moms Against Gun Violence, just a lot of people coming together to give voice to a lot of issues.”Maher said he found it interesting to see the interactions between people from both sides of the political spectrum.“It was very enlightening to see the other side,” he said. “I’m glad that I went. I haven’t really been super active in going to a lot of political rallies and stuff unfortunately because I’ve just been so busy throughout the year but I was happy that I got to make it out to this one.”Tags: Donald Trump, Donald Trump protest, Elkhart, Mike Pencelast_img read more

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Mayville Boil Water Advisory Continues Through Friday

first_imgCredit WRDW TVMAYVILLE — The water boil advisory for Village of Mayville water customers will remain in effect until at least Friday.Officials said bottled water is being distributed to residents who need it from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. at 2 Academy Street at the pole barn located in the back parking lot.The order started Monday after service was interrupted due to a water main leak.The Department says when the distribution pipes and mains lose pressure it increases the chance that untreated water and harmful microbes could enter the system. Boiling the water kills bacteria and other organisms that could be present.Water for drinking, cooking, making ice, brushing teeth and making coffee must be brought to a rolling boil for 1 minute then cooled prior to use. Officials say do not drink the water without boiling it first or use bottled water until further notice.Some customers may notice brown water or air in the water when first turning on water taps. Air can be bled out by slowly opening taps and running water at a slow rate.Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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