Month: December 2020

Taekwondo Team Selected To Compete In Military World Games

first_imgBy Dialogo April 05, 2011 I want be a part of the Army’s National Taekwondo Team. My name is Imar. I’m in the Cartagena Battalion BAFIM2. I want to be a part of the Army’s Taekwondo team. My name is Imar. I’m in the Cartagena Battalion BAFIM2. All-Army taekwondo athletes captured eight of ten weight classes contested at the Armed Forces/CISM Taekwondo Qualifier at Fort Indiantown Gap, PA. One Marine and one Air Force athlete won the two other weight classes at the event. The first-place finisher in each weight class qualified for the 2011 USA Taekwondo Senior National Championships to be conducted in early July in San Jose, Calif. The Armed Forces event was also used to select the team to participate in the 20th CISM (World Military) Taekwondo Championship that will be conducted mid-July at the 5th Military World Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.last_img read more

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Colombian National Navy Getting New Coastal Patrol Boat

first_img A highlight of the vessel’s characteristics is a deployable ramp at the stern, enabling the rapid launch of a small boat in support of operations in the fight against drug trafficking, saving human lives at sea, and protecting the environment. At the prow, the vessel will have a naval gun for surface fire support. The National Navy has seven coastal patrol boats, three of them in the jurisdiction of the Caribbean Naval Force and the other four in the jurisdiction of the Pacific Naval Force, with the “ARC 11 de Noviembre” being the first of the CPV 40 class. In a voyage that will last forty-two days, the “ARC 11 de Noviembre” will visit the ports of Lisbon in Portugal, Mindelo in Cape Verde, Fortaleza and Belem in Brazil, and Bridgetown in Barbados, before arriving at the Colombian port of Cartagena de Indias. The chief mission of this unit, which is expected to arrive in a Colombian port on 20 June, will be to carry out maritime interdiction operations and guarantee adequate coverage of the Caribbean coastline and the island area of the Department of San Andrés, including Providencia Island, Santa Catalina Island, and the other islands that make up the San Andrés Archipelago. By Dialogo May 12, 2011 The ARC 11 de Noviembre, the National Navy’s new coastal patrol boat, which will reinforce maritime interdiction and search-and-rescue operations in the Colombian Caribbean, has left the port of Berne, Germany. center_img This is the National Navy’s first patrol boat of the CPV (Coastal Patrol Vessel) 40 class, with a length of 40 meters, a beam of 7.56 meters, a displacement of 245 tons, and a range of two thousand nautical miles and fifteen days sailing, with twenty-four men on board. The machine room, for its part, has a control system operated from the bridge, enabling greater control of the equipment. The naming ceremony for the “ARC 11 de Noviembre”, which will carry the number 145 on its hull, will be held as part of the celebration of the National Navy’s 188th anniversary, to be commemorated on 24 July. Construction began in Germany approximately a year ago on this coastal patrol boat, which will be named the “ARC 11 de Noviembre” in honor of the date on which independence was proclaimed in the city of Cartagena, 11 November. last_img read more

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Brazilian Military Team Wins First Gold Medal in Triathlon World Championship

first_imgBy Dialogo August 29, 2012 The national anthem and the green and yellow flag took over the city of Lausanne, Switzerland, on August 25. For the first time, Brazil was on top of the podium in the female, male, and mixed teams’ modalities in the Triathlon World Championship (swimming, cycling, and running). The Brazilian athletes qualified in all five categories of the competition, bringing home three gold medals, one silver and one bronze. The positive outcome, according to the chief of the Brazilian delegation, Colonel Mario Felizardo Medina, surprised the competitors, who placed the Chinese, French, and Polish delegates as favorites. “The strategy used in the competition was very important, and also the job well done by the team”, he stated. According to the colonel, in addition to their opponents, the Brazilian athletes faced difficulties with the time difference (five hours ahead of their capital, Brasília), the food, and the fact that they had arrived to the European country the day before the competition. Once more, the female participation stood out among the Brazilian military athletes. The winner of one of the gold medals was 24-year-old Sergeant Pâmella Nascimento de Oliveira, from Rio Grande do Sul. The athlete is now the world military champion. She recently participated in the 2012 London Olympic Games, and also won the bronze medal in the Pan-American Games last year. Another Army officer, 26-year-old Sergeant Reinaldo Colucci, from São Paulo, won a gold medal for the Brazilian team in the individual modality. He is the current Pan-American Triathlon champion. He gained the lead during the running portion of the last competition, guaranteeing the medal. In his personal website he said he was “very happy and proud to see the Brazilian flag at the top.” The mixed team won the third gold medal. The results gave Brazil first place on the podium. The Brazilian military also won a silver medal for the male team, for which the teamwork of Army sergeants Reinaldo Colucci, Marcus Fernandes, Bruno Matheus, Wesley Matos, as well as that of Major Kelmerson Buck, and Capitan Diefferson Felix prevailed. The female team won the bronze, with Army sergeants Pâmella Oliveira, Flávia Fernandes, and Vanessa Gianinni; and sailors Carolina Furriela, Fernanda Garcia, and Carolina Menezes. The Military Triathlon World Championship, organized by the Swiss Army this year, brought together approximately 120 athletes from 18 countries. The Army Sports Committee trained the Brazilian team in Rio de Janeiro. The victory, according to Col. Medina, the next step is the 2015 Military World Games delegation, in South Korea. “This is our main goal from now on”, he said.last_img read more

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Guatemala Destroys Millions of Poppy and Marijuana Crops

first_img Guatemalan security forces destroyed about 855 million poppy and marihuana plants in a large operation carried out in the so called “opium triangle,” in the western district of San Marcos, near the Mexican border, the Ministry of Interior informed. The minister said that the plantations were hidden among legume and corn crops, and that during the operation “four different types of poppy plants were identified.” López explained that “the first phase of poppy and marihuana eradication took place from January 28 to 31 in the so called “opium triangle,” in the municipalities of Sibinal, Ixchiguán and Tajmulco in San Marcos, located 350 km west of the capital. By Dialogo February 08, 2013 The operation was carried out by 300 police agents and 200 Army members; 190 hectares of illicit crops were destroyed, exceeding the 338 million poppy plants eradicated in 2012, he specified. “We have been able to duplicate the results obtained last year, and we expect to surpass the numbers with the second phase of eradication,” he added, without specifying the date of said operation. “Operations were performed in 1,316 fields in 21 points of eradication, where over 852 million poppy and marihuana plants were destroyed,” Minister of Interior Mauricio López stated on the ministry’s website on February 6. A report issued by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) considers poppy crops – raw material for opium – as a growing problem in Guatemala. The document indicates that the eradication only represents 10 percent of the crops, which could suggest a total area of 15,000 hectares, considering that over 1,500 hectares were destroyed in 2011.last_img read more

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Sophisticated flight simulator helps Costa Rican SVA pilots fight organized crime

first_img SVA plays a key role in providing security for Costa Rica For example, Costa Rica currently receives aid from the U.S. government through various programs. From 2009 to September 11, Costa Rica received more than $25 million (USD) in assistance to support border security, judicial processes, and safe communities. The equipment is located in the facilities of the aerial section of the Department of Public Security at Juan Santamaría International Airport (AIJS), in Alajuela. The equipment is located in the facilities of the aerial section of the Department of Public Security at Juan Santamaría International Airport (AIJS), in Alajuela. Cooperation includes training That task falls to SVA’s aircraft maintenance department, which is comprised of 11 technical mechanics who are responsible for certifying the safety of SVA aircraft – including some which were seized from drug traffickers. By Dialogo November 14, 2014 “I want to thank our friends in the United States government for being our partners in this initiative,” said Minister of Public Security Celso Gamboa Sánchez. “This is the best flight simulator currently in Costa Rica and it makes the Ministry of Public Security a technological leader.” “This simulator was a real necessity,” said Paul Chávez, a security analyst at the Latin University of Costa Rica. “This simulator was a real necessity,” said Paul Chávez, a security analyst at the Latin University of Costa Rica. Cooperation includes training The Costa Rican Aerial Surveillance Service (SVA) has an important new tool in its fight against drug trafficking and other criminal enterprises: A Piper Seneca III Flight Simulator that pilots can use for training. The SVA fleet is comprised of 17 aircraft, including 14 fixed-wing planes and 3 helicopters. Its fleet was entirely donated by other countries or confiscated from drug traffickers. Each seized aircraft is worth between $15 million and $30 million (USD). That task falls to SVA’s aircraft maintenance department, which is comprised of 11 technical mechanics who are responsible for certifying the safety of SVA aircraft – including some which were seized from drug traffickers. Costa Rica does not have a military force, so the SVA plays a key role in ensuring the country’s public safety. It serves as the airborne branch of the country’s police force, and is responsible for ensuring public order, the safety and integrity of Costa Rican air space, surveillance, transporting public officials domestically and internationally, and responding to public emergencies, such as natural disasters. The Costa Rican Aerial Surveillance Service (SVA) has an important new tool in its fight against drug trafficking and other criminal enterprises: A Piper Seneca III Flight Simulator that pilots can use for training. Flight simulator an important training tool The Piper Seneca III will allow the SVA’s 30 pilots to maintain and sharpen their skills on a daily basis. It’s the first simulator for SVA police pilots, featuring a replica of an actual aircraft cabin and equipped with sophisticated technology that simulates real-life scenarios. The simulator will allow them to hone their professional skills and abilities without risking planes in an actual fight and without expending fuel or polluting the environment. SVA pilots conduct surveillance flights to monitor organized crime groups and common criminals, and also fly humanitarian missions to help the civilian population during natural disasters. Flight simulator an important training tool Costa Rica does not have a military force, so the SVA plays a key role in ensuring the country’s public safety. It serves as the airborne branch of the country’s police force, and is responsible for ensuring public order, the safety and integrity of Costa Rican air space, surveillance, transporting public officials domestically and internationally, and responding to public emergencies, such as natural disasters. The SVA fleet is comprised of 17 aircraft, including 14 fixed-wing planes and 3 helicopters. Its fleet was entirely donated by other countries or confiscated from drug traffickers. Each seized aircraft is worth between $15 million and $30 million (USD). “I want to thank our friends in the United States government for being our partners in this initiative,” said Minister of Public Security Celso Gamboa Sánchez. “This is the best flight simulator currently in Costa Rica and it makes the Ministry of Public Security a technological leader.” The flight simulator joins the array of sophisticated technology, such as radar systems, that the SVA uses to conduct maritime patrols — often in cooperation with U.S. security forces. The Piper Seneca III will allow the SVA’s 30 pilots to maintain and sharpen their skills on a daily basis. It’s the first simulator for SVA police pilots, featuring a replica of an actual aircraft cabin and equipped with sophisticated technology that simulates real-life scenarios. The simulator will allow them to hone their professional skills and abilities without risking planes in an actual fight and without expending fuel or polluting the environment. The flight simulator joins the array of sophisticated technology, such as radar systems, that the SVA uses to conduct maritime patrols — often in cooperation with U.S. security forces. In addition to donating the device, USSOUTHCOM trained SVA technical personnel how to maintain it. In addition to donating the device, USSOUTHCOM trained SVA technical personnel how to maintain it. The device will help pilots train to perform difficult maneuvers, such as landing in remote rural areas where there is no airport or landing strip. And flight hours in the simulator will be recognized for pilot certifications. The device will help pilots train to perform difficult maneuvers, such as landing in remote rural areas where there is no airport or landing strip. And flight hours in the simulator will be recognized for pilot certifications. The United States Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) delivered the donated flight simulator, worth about US $305,000, to SVA headquarters, the Ministry of Public Security announced October 15. SVA plays a key role in providing security for Costa Rica SVA pilots conduct surveillance flights to monitor organized crime groups and common criminals, and also fly humanitarian missions to help the civilian population during natural disasters. For example, Costa Rica currently receives aid from the U.S. government through various programs. From 2009 to September 11, Costa Rica received more than $25 million (USD) in assistance to support border security, judicial processes, and safe communities. The United States and Costa Rica cooperate in the fight against transnational criminal enterprises, primarily by sharing information and resources. The United States Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) delivered the donated flight simulator, worth about US $305,000, to SVA headquarters, the Ministry of Public Security announced October 15. The United States and Costa Rica cooperate in the fight against transnational criminal enterprises, primarily by sharing information and resources. last_img read more

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JTF-Bravo Firefighting Ops Wrap up in Panama

first_img Fighting hundreds of fires Members of Joint Task Force-Bravo (JTF-B) partnered with Panamanian Public Forces to contain multiple life-threatening wildfires on April 17th and 18th. “There are populated areas out there where hundreds of fires were burning around, and I think we kept some of them at bay,” said U.S. Army Captain Eric Rathbun, 1-228th AVN Alpha Company commander. “We dropped approximately 100,000 gallons of water between our package of one CH-47 (Chinook) and two UH-60 (Blackhawks).” The Panamanian firefighting operation occurred less than a month after the 1-228th AVN sent air assets to help contain a fire near the town of Tela, Honduras.” U.S. Army Lt. Col. Daniel Moore, 1-228th AVN commander, expanded on the Panamanian Colonel’s comments about developing a strong working relationship between the two forces. By Dialogo April 25, 2016 “JTF-B forces have come to Panama before, but this was the first time I’ve worked with them for [a fire-fighting operation],” said Col. Perez. “It was a really good opportunity to work together, and I want to say ‘thank you’ to everyone who helped us for all your hard work.” The fires, which are believed to have started April 4th, grew exponentially, prompting the government of Panama, via the U.S. Embassy in Panama, to request an aerial support package from JTF-B consisting of aircraft from the 1st Battalion, 228th Aviation Regiment, Soto Cano Air Base, Honduras, to help contain the blazes. Panamanian Servicio Nacional Aeronaval Col. Gustavo Perez, chief of firefighting operations in the Darién province, said the three ‘birds’ the 1-228th AVN brought – along with their Bambi Buckets which were refilled in the area’s many bodies of water after each pass and dump – were ideal for this operation because of their ability to access areas unreachable by land firefighting crews and the volume of water each aircraft’s Bambi Bucket can drop on a single pass. “This was definitely a combined effort with JTF-B working in support of Panamanian forces. We were just the guys out here supporting their effort and assisting them with the fires,” Lt. Col. Moore said. “We learned a great deal about coordinating with Panamanian forces and doing crisis-action planning with them. The team did an outstanding job, and it definitely was a combined effort in both the planning and execution.” About 45,000 people reside in the Darién Province, so stopping the spread of the fire from the undeveloped swampland and forests to residential areas was of utmost importance. “JTF-B has been in the Central American region for a very long time. There was a time when it was involved in supporting the fight against communism,” said John Feeley, U.S. Ambassador to Panama. “If you take a look at what JTF-B’s mission is today, it is directly in support of providing better lives for Central Americans. Whether it’s disaster relief, fighting criminal organizations, counter narcotics, logistics, or training with the partner nations of Central America, JTF-B is a jewel in the crown of the American military presence in Latin America.” The ambassador concluded, “I hope we can count on them for a long time to come.”last_img read more

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Guardians of the Homeland

first_imgBy Iris Amador/Diálogo April 10, 2017 The Honduran Armed Forces kicked off their annual Guardians of the Homeland program on February 18th. Through extracurricular activities, the program seeks to instill values and principles in young people to stop them from participating in criminal organizations. “We teach them to love their homeland,” Captain Mauricio Alemán, director of Policies, Planning, and Programs for Civilian Affairs of the Armed Forces told Diálogo. “What we teach the kids is fairly broad. We don’t teach them anything related to the military. That’s not the objective.” The program is geared towards reinforcing a sense of right and wrong and instilling morals and leadership principles among minors throughout the country’s 18 departments. In addition to receiving ethical and spiritual guidance, the participants, who are between the ages of 7 and 16, are exposed to educational, athletic, and cultural activities. Roughly 136,000 children and young adults have participated in the program over the past five years. Program activities The minors attend the school facilities every Saturday. In addition to talks and workshops, they are provided with medical services and psychological care for three months. Members of the Armed Forces pick up the children and their guardians from their houses and drive them to the educational centers. When the day is over, they return them home. “We are responsible for their commute, their snack, and lunch for them and their parents,” Capt. Alemán explained. “We organize medical brigades to provide health care, their teeth get fixed, they receive free medicine, and if possible, they are hospitalized free of charge when they get sick.” To support their physical, mental and emotional development, the girls and boys have the opportunity to play, participate in soccer tournaments and visit museums, parks, and zoos. Throughout the day, the children also receive help with their performance at school. “We want to expose them to healthy spaces and experiences. We want to improve their sense of self-esteem and their ability to analyze and make good decisions in the future so they don’t fall prey to people who want to lead them to violence,” Capt. Alemán said. Children of gang members The program is backed by government institutions such as the National Institute of Professional Training, where young people receive technical training in the areas of construction, electrical work, carpentry, computers, tourism, automotive repair, food management, and baking. The private sector is also involved in the program. Universities provide psychologists and sociologists, while medical associations send representatives to provide health care. “Up to now, we’ve had around 200 kids who’ve received grants,” Capt. Alemán said as he discussed the collaboration of private companies that provide grants to the older children. “They are supporting us because they see the program as being positive since we work with at-risk kids.” “We received a letter from a gang member. In it, he expressed his gratitude to the Armed Forces because we are educating his child differently. He mentioned that he doesn’t want his child to be like him. He doesn’t want him to be a hit man. He wants him to be a good child,” Capt. Alemán said. Changing lives The Honduran Armed Forces work with state institutions designed specifically to look after the wellbeing of the country’s minors. “We are also supervised by DINAF [the Directorate for Children, Adolescents, and the Family, per its Spanish acronym], so that the civilian population can be certain that the program is only looking to ensure the wellbeing of the children and youth and help out the parents,” Capt. Alemán said. The program provides care and guidance to approximately 28,000 young people annually. Paola Ortíz, 17, is one of the teenagers who has benefited from the program. “In those days, I wasn’t going to school, my mom wasn’t able to send me there,” she told Diálogo. She saw in the program a worthwhile opportunity to learn. “To tell you the truth, I felt like my morale was very low, but the talks they gave us really motivated me. They said that if I fell, I should get back up, and so here I am. I thank God always,” Ortíz added. She dreams of being a journalist. Her dream could become a reality. Ortíz received a grant from Guardians of the Homeland, and today she is enrolled in the first year of an undergraduate program in sciences and humanities at the Intur Institute in Tegucigalpa. “Being part of the program has helped me a lot in life,” she concluded.last_img read more

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Chilean Armed Forces Take Action to Fight Coronavirus

first_imgBy Marcos Ommati / Diálogo April 02, 2020 Chilean President Sebastián Piñera declared a state of emergency for 90 days beginning March 19, to address the COVID-19 crisis. The borders are closed to foreign visitors in an attempt to avoid the entry of people who might be infected, and a curfew was established from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.“The objective is to anticipate, to prepare us to deal with the upcoming stages in this matter. It will allow us to provide better security in our hospitals and all health care facilities,” said the Chilean president.Piñera also declared that service members would protect critical infrastructure, such as hospitals. He said that this decision seeks to “better protect the logistics chain for medical supplies; to facilitate the care and transport of patients and medical personnel, as well as the evacuation of people when necessary; and to ensure that people comply with the quarantine and social distancing measures that were established.”Heads of National DefenseThe president appointed 16 heads of National Defense (12 Army generals, two Air Force generals, and two Navy admirals) in every region in the country. They will coordinate collaboration efforts to safeguard public order, patient transport, and hospital protection, among other tasks. If quarantines or curfews are indicated in specific regions or places, it is the responsibility of each head of Defense to ensure compliance.“[Service members] will protect the logistics chain and the transport of medical supplies; they will protect hospitals and health care centers, including critical infrastructure of basic services. In addition, the Armed Forces will collaborate with the police to safeguard public order,” said the Chilean Navy in a press release.President Piñera said that Chilean service members can also act as real “health forces.” Minister of Defense Alberto Espina and Minister of Health Jaime Mañalich agreed that the Armed Forces can collaborate with health officials and ensure order for the collection, storage, or organization of food reserves and facilitate the transport of patients and health personnel from one medical facility to another.“The Armed Forces have a capacity for leadership, order, and control like no other human organization. They can react quickly and effectively in the event of any emergency. They are capable of deploying nationwide in an agile, orderly way,” said Minister Mañalich. “They can concentrate resources to support this health alert and the state of emergency very quickly, and they are able to transport a large number of personnel. Not to mention the survival skills and autonomy that they have when they are away from their bases,” he said.In theory, Chile can count on about 88,000 men and women that are part of the country’s Armed Forces to fight against the coronavirus.last_img read more

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Court fines judge forcampaign violations

first_img Court fines judge for campaign violations A public reprimand, a fine, and a four-month suspension have been ordered by the Florida Supreme Court for a circuit judge who violated state campaign laws. It’s the first time a judge has been fined as part of a disciplinary proceeding, and only the second time one has been suspended.In the October 3 order, the court accepted the recommendations for punishment from the Judicial Qualifications Commission after earlier rejecting a recommendation that the sanctions be limited to a public reprimand. The judge was also ordered to pay court reporting costs associated with the JQC investigation.The case involved 11th Circuit Court Judge Rosa Rodriguez, who in her 1998 election campaign reported that she had made a $200,000 loan to her campaign when the money actually came from her then-boyfriend, attorney Gabriel Bach.She also wrote a personal check to her campaign for that amount before the money was deposited in her personal account, misrepresented that the money actually came from her or her brother, said on a campaign report that the money was a loan from her brother, misreported the date of the loan, falsely reported that she had repaid $105,191 of the loan to herself when in reality $80,000 had been repaid to Bach, and failed to list the loan on financial disclosure forms as required.Those actions, which the court agreed had been proved by clear and convincing evidence, violated two state laws and several judicial canons.Rodriguez had previously taken an eight-month paid leave of absence while the 11th Circuit State Attorneys Office investigated the issue. She returned to the bench when no criminal charges were filed.The JQC based its recommendation for a four-month unpaid suspension and $40,000 fine on repaying the state the compensation the judge received on that paid leave, since the state got no benefit from her services during that period. The court accepted that rationale, but said in the future the commission should consider other factors in recommending fines.“Generally, when a judge is suspended or on leave, a senior judge is appointed in her place. The senior judge’s salary is paid out of a special fund,” the opinion said. “Thus, the JQC should in the future also take into consideration, when determining the amount of any fine, the potential financial burden a given circuit incurs when it has to appoint a senior judge in the event of a suspension. Any fine that is intended to make the circuit whole should include that amount.”But in this case, the court said it would accept the JQC recommendations. It ordered the suspension to be effective immediately and the fine to be paid in monthly installments for the rest of her term starting when Rodriguez returns to the bench. It also ordered her to appear before the court for the reprimand and to pay all court reporter fees incurred by the JQC.A 1996 constitutional amendment for the first time gave the court the authority to impose fines and suspensions as part of judicial discipline. Until then, only two sanctions were available: reprimand or removal from office. The court had previously suspended a judge for 10 days for witnessing the theft of a video camera and not reporting it to police.The Miami Herald quoted Rodriguez’s attorney as saying she accepted the court’s finding. The court approved the opinion 6-0, with Justice R. Fred Lewis recused. November 1, 2002 Regular Newscenter_img Court fines judge forcampaign violationslast_img read more

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Marsicano Award nominations sought

first_img November 15, 2002 Regular News Marsicano Award nominations soughtThe City, County and Local Government Law Section is now accepting nominations for its Ralph A. Marsicano Award.The award is given to a lawyer who has made a significant contribution to the practice of local government law. The award honors Marsicano who served in Tampa for more than 30 years as an assistant, and often acting, city attorney. He was often considered the “Dean of U.S. City Attorneys.”Nominations must be submitted in writing to Carol Kirkland, section administrator, The Florida Bar, 651 E. Jefferson Street, Tallahassee 32399-2300, accompanied by a summary of the nominee’s activities and accomplishments which qualify the individual for receipt of the award. A resume of the nominee’s credentials should be submitted with the written nomination.The deadline for receipt of nominations is Friday, April 8, 2003. The award will be presented at the City, County and Local Government Law Section’s 26th Annual Local Government Law Seminar, May 9, 2003, at the Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel in Tampa. Marsicano Award nominations soughtlast_img read more

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