Category: wcjzvllrxwoa

Expanding Broadband

first_imgGeorgia farmers have technological advancements at their fingertips but many are not able to use them to their fullest extent due to the lack of broadband internet access, according to Wes Porter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension precision agriculture and irrigation specialist.“We’re creating all sorts of useful data on machines in the field but if we don’t have a reliable way to get it off the machines, processed and back into the farmers’ hands, it’s not going to be utilized,” Porter said.Rep. Buddy Carter of Georgia’s 1st District, Rep. Austin Scott of Georgia’s 8th District, and Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Commissioner Brendan Carr met with members of the UGA Precision Agriculture team and stakeholders from the Georgia Cotton Commission, Georgia Peanut Commission, Georgia Pecan Commission and the Flint River Water District on Wednesday, April 17, on the UGA Tifton campus to discuss the importance of broadband access for the future and sustainability of Georgia agriculture.“The important thing is that the FCC commissioner got to hear firsthand from the people who need this technology to produce sustainable crops. However, it’s not just for them, but it’s important to ensure prosperity for the rural economy. If the farmers are doing well, the whole rural economy’s going to do well,” Scott added.Porter and UGA agricultural engineer Glen Rains made it plain that tools such as auto-steer technology, variable rate irrigation, in-field controllers, smartphone apps, soil moisture sensors and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are all critical precision agriculture tools they use in their research for the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. These technologies help UGA scientists be more efficient in the field. Unfortunately, many of the state’s producers are restricted by the lack of broadband access or poor-quality broadband service.“We’re sitting on the cusp of all of this new and innovative technology. Most of our farmers have this technology, but it’s underutilized for that one reason,” Porter said.Variable rate irrigation allows farmers to use water more efficiently by only applying water to the areas of the field that need it. Smartphone apps and soil moisture sensors enable producers to know when to schedule an irrigation application and how much to apply. Unmanned aerial vehicles allow producers to know when crops are stressed by disease or lack of nutrients.“We know that information regarding our crops can change, sometimes hourly. We know we definitely need daily decisions when we’re looking at it. We need the data uploaded and a decision made within a day, maximum,” Porter said. “Sometimes we may want it a little faster if it’s a fast-moving disease. We just don’t want the information to be sitting on a controller or field computer for weeks or seasons at a time. The timeliness is gone. There’s very little use for it anymore.”Congressman Scott stressed the importance of FCC Commissioner Carr taking the time to visit with the UGA scientists to talk about the need for fast access to web-based data.“Whether it’s satellite data or web-based internet data, it is extremely important for precision agriculture,” Scott said. “I’m just thankful he came down to listen to the people who are carrying out the research to learn exactly how much good it can do, not just for the farmers but for the environment.”last_img read more

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State seeks input on proposed archeology protection changes

first_img-30- The state is asking for feedback from archeological experts, developers, and the public on a proposed new method to pay for protecting archeological sites and new rules for historic preservation.Officials with the Agency of Commerce and Community Developments’ Division for Historic Preservation are planning a series of meetings this summer to discuss a new funding system to pay for archeological studies undertaken as part of Act 250, as well as other protection activities.“We’re looking for feedback as we move forward with proposed rule changes,” said Betsy Bishop, Commissioner of the Department of Economic Development. “We want to make sure that the Division for Historic Preservation’s practices are consistent with the law, and that all applicants have clear expectations that everyone agrees upon.”Under Act 250, the state’s environmental protection and development control law, the Division for Historic Preservation makes recommendations to the district environmental commissions on whether a proposed development would impact “historic sites,” including archeological sites.“We don’t issue permits,” Bishop said. “The division recommends whether a project should get a permit, and how much field study should be done to determine whether an area is archeologically significant and should be protected. The District Commission makes those decisions.”The new rules the state is considering, Bishop said, would clarify that district commissions have the decision-making authority about such questions as whether to require additional field studies and the cost of paying for them.How applicants would pay for the costs associated with deciding what sites are historically significant and protecting them is the other part of the equation.“The recently enacted fee bill directed the Division for Historic Preservation and the Natural Resources Board to collaborate on developing a fee schedule to fund these operations,” Bishop said. “We’re asking for feedback from developers and other stakeholders on that and the rules changes.”The Division for Historic Preservation plans to hold public meetings to gather feedback from stakeholders and the public on June 23 in Williston; on June 25 in Rutland; on June 30 in St. Johnsbury; and in Rockingham on July 14.Additional details and the draft proposed rules are available at www.HistoricVermont.org(link is external) Source: Economic Development Deptlast_img read more

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Correction: FairPoint story error in October VBM

first_imgConsolidated Communications,Vermont Business Magazine issued the following correction related to a story on FairPoint Communications in its October 2011 issue:‘A photo caption from 2009 was mistakenly attached to a photo on page 43 in the October 2011 issue that indicated that regulators are questioning FairPoint’s continued operation. That is not the case. The accompanying article discusses FairPoint’s response to Tropical Storm Irene and its future plans and should not have contained outdated and incorrect information. We regret the error.”Timothy McQuiston, Editor. 10.7.2011last_img read more

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Editorial: Energy Companies Must Be Held Accountable for Cleanup Costs

first_imgEditorial: Energy Companies Must Be Held Accountable for Cleanup Costs FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享From Bloomberg View:The broader question is how many more Peabodys there may be, and how to pay for the environmental damage they have caused. The company is the latest in a string of U.S. coal producers to fail, in an industry that has lost 20,000 jobs and 94 percent of its market value since 2011. U.S. coal production in the first three months of 2016 fell 38 percent from the same period last year.One thing states should do is not to allow the practice of self-bonding. In Peabody’s case, the federal government in February warned states that continuing to allow the practice was a bad idea. Yet Illinois, for example, continued to allow it even after the state’s attorney general raised concerns about Peabody’s ability to meet its obligations.Yes, requiring coal producers to bear the full cost of their cleanup obligations may push some into bankruptcy. And mining companies are some of these states’ largest employers. But states can’t halt the long slide of the coal industry by allowing coal companies to discount their environmental obligations. And even if they could, regulators’ responsibility is to the interests of the public. Better to insist on honest accounting, then let the market decide who survives.It’s an issue that affects more than just coal mining. The federal government allows oil and gas companies to self-bond, a practice now under review for companies working in the Gulf of Mexico. The case of Peabody is a warning to all levels of government about the risks of letting companies simply vouch for their ability to clean up after themselves.The Lessons of a Coal Giant’s Collapselast_img read more

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7 ways your attempts to save money can backfire

first_imgYou’re doing your best to spend less and save more — at least, you think so. You try to be smart with your purchases, live frugally and put money into savings each month.But what if all the effort you’re putting into cutting costs and trying to set aside cash for the future isn’t paying off the way you hoped? Here are seven ways your attempts to save money could be backfiring.1. You Spend Too Much Time Trying to Find the Best DealWhen my family was planning a trip to the beach this summer, my husband spent weeks searching for the best deal on a vacation rental property. However, every time he found a condo or beach house that fit our needs and was reasonably priced, he continued to look for an even better bargain instead of making the purchase. In the meantime, the most affordable properties were being booked by other buyers. We ended up paying a few hundred dollars more for a place that wasn’t as desirable as the cheaper, better ones located earlier in the search.Of course, it’s always smart to compare prices when making a purchase. But sometimes spending too much time trying to find the best deal will cause you to miss out on a pretty good one. Further, many consumers become so focused on deal-hunting that they lose revenue they could have earned working. continue reading » 38SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Six fast vessels equipped for emergency medical care on the Adriatic were procured

first_imgConsidering that the emergency medical service must be available to all citizens, for the next financial period the Minister of Regional Development and EU Funds Gabrijela Žalac announced the consideration of establishing an emergency helicopter medical service that would be complementary to the contract signed today and would help urgent care of patients from the island. . Fast boats will significantly improve the transport of life-threatening patients from the island to the nearest hospital on the coast. On the other hand, twelve biochemical analyzers will enable the eight most important emergency blood tests that will make it easier for doctors to diagnose and make decisions about the urgency of a patient’s condition.  The funds will be spent on the purchase of fast boats, contracting berths in the ports of departure, and blood analyzers, which in a short time may indicate the need for urgent transport of the patient to the hospital. The specified boats will be stationed in Mali Lošinj, Rab, Zadar, Šibenik, Supetar and Dubrovnik, and will be distributed to all inhabited islands, for 122 thousand inhabitants and their guests. The Ministry of Regional Development and EU Funds has signed contracts for the allocation of 45 million kuna in grants to the Ministry of Health for the purchase of six fast vessels equipped for emergency medical care in the Adriatic and twelve biochemical blood analyzers for emergency diagnostics on the islands.center_img Illustration / Photo: Stem Marine The establishment of an emergency medical helicopter is being considered for the next financial period last_img read more

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No vacancy: Qld rental markets tighten as tenant demand rises

first_imgREIQ chief executive Antonia Mercorella. Photo: Claudia Baxter. The vacancy rate in Cairns has tightened to 1.3 per cent, according to the REIQ.Landlords also have the upper hand on the Fraser Coast, where the vacancy rate fell to 1.1 per cent during the quarter.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours agoBut the Townsville market was the biggest mover of the quarter. The vacancy rate there moved from a weak 4.3 per cent to a very tight 1.5 per cent in the first three months of the year. MORE: Property beats the gym any day An average three-bedroom house in Cairns is now $45 a week more expensive to lease than it was a year ago. Cityscape of the Cairns CBD. Picture: Brendan Radke.Gladstone’s rental market moved into the healthy range in the March quarter for the first time in six years, tightening from 4.2 per cent to 3.5 per cent.“This market has been gradually improving since it peaked at 11.3 per cent vacancies in March 2016,” Ms Mercorella said.“The inexorable downward trend has consistently suggested an improving market with rental supply and demand trends now the closest to intersecting in almost seven years.”The Greater Brisbane market remained steady at 2.2 per cent during the quarter, while the inner Brisbane market tightened significantly — from 4 per cent to 2.1 per cent. The no vacancy signs are going up fast as vacancy rates tighten across Queensland.QUEENSLAND is fast becoming a landlord’s market, with property investors in the box seat as vacancy rates continue to tighten. The regional markets are now home to some of the hardest places in the state to rent a property, with strong demand and limited supply pushing up rents, according to new figures from the Real Estate Institute of Queensland. The rental market in Cairns tightened to 1.3 per cent in the March quarter, with rents increasing by $10 to $15 a week. RELATED: Worst of downturn could be over Ms Mercorella said apartment oversupply in inner Brisbane peaked in the March quarter of 2017 when the vacancy rate reached 4.4 per cent. The outer Brisbane regions of Ipswich, Logan, Moreton Bay, and Redland are tight at a combined 2 per cent.Terry Ryder of Hotspotting said the Cairns, Townsville and Toowoomba markets were worth a look for would-be investors, along with Gladstone, which suffered a significant blow during the resources downturn.last_img read more

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GLDD Bags Corpus Christi Dredging Project

first_imgGreat Lakes Dredge & Dock Corporation (GLDD) has announced the receipt of a $93 million contract award for the Corpus Christi Ship Channel Improvement Project.According to GLDD, the dredging to deepen the entrance channel will begin during the second quarter of 2019 with completion expected in early 2020.The overall ship channel deepening effort will be comprised of multiple phases, expected to be competitively bid and worked over the next five years. The total estimated contract value of these projects is approximately $360 million.Lasse Petterson, Chief Executive Officer of Great Lakes, commented, “This complex deepening work is well suited to our proven experience in this type of project, including our expertise in minimizing the environmental impact of our projects on the natural habitats of the work areas.”David Simonelli, President Dredging, commented, “The Corpus Christi Ship Channel Improvement Project is an important win for the Company and begins the long awaited deepening cycle for the Port of Corpus Christi. Three additional contracts are planned to create much needed deep water access to the Port. Great Lakes’ dredging operations will utilize hopper and cutter suction dredges to excavate over 6.6 million cubic yards of dense sands and clays to a depth of 58 ft.”The Port of Corpus Christi is the largest crude export port in the United States and processes approximately 100 million tons each year. The Port’s impact on the United States economy exceeds $124 billion annually and the planned work on this channel over the next five years is expected to bring significant benefit to the United States, Texas and local economies.This deepening project will be a major step toward the United States’ objective of becoming a net exporter of its energy production. This project is sponsored by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Galveston District, working in partnership with the Port of Corpus Christi to fund the work.last_img read more

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Chelsea flop joins Aston Villa on season-long loan

first_imgChelsea flop Danny Drinkwater has joined Aston Villa on loan until the end of the season. The former Leicester star, 29, was at Villa’s Bodymoor Heath training ground this morning completing his medical as boss Dean Smith looks to bolster his struggling squad. Drinkwater had been on loan at Burnley thought the first half of the season, but played just once in the Premier League. The midfielder was sent back to Stamford Bridge earlier this month. Smith said of the deal: “Danny was a key member of Leicester City’s title winning team and has represented England so he is a vastly experienced player. “He will strengthen our squad significantly.” Loading… Promoted ContentPlaying Games For Hours Can Do This To Your Body5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do6 Extreme Facts About HurricanesWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?Which Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show YouPortuguese Street Artist Creates Hyper-Realistic 3D GraffitiInsane 3D Spraying Skills Turn In Incredible Street Art8 Little-Known Facts About Ancient Egypt That Will Puzzle YouWho Earns More Than Ronaldo? It’s thought Aston Villa may be forced to pay Drinkwater’s full, £110,000-a-week wages, with the Blues adamant they won’t pay a penny. Villa are locked in a relegation dogfight and currently sit one point above the dropzone. Drinkwater’s season has been the worst of his career, plagued by injuries and off-field problems. Read Also:Chelsea flop undergoes Villa medical ahead of loan switch The England international suffered an injury after becoming involved in a fight on a boozy night out which has limited his impact with the Clarets. Chelsea chief Frank Lampard has already decided Drinkwater has no future in West London. The ex-England star is under contract at the Blues until 2022, after penning a five-year deal after joining the club from Leicester for £35million in 2017. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

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Annual Handbags For Hope Benefits Safe Passage

first_imgChurch On The Rock will host the 2nd annual “Handbags for Hope”auction at BMS Saturday.More Than 200 are expected to turn out Saturday, June 14, for the 2ND annual “Handbags for Hope,” silent-auction fundraising event for Safe Passage Inc. It again is being hosted by the women’s ministry of Church on the Rock.The fundraiser, which raised $5,000 last year for Safe Passage, is the first of its kind in this area and will feature new or gently-used, themed purses, baskets and totes filled with theme-related items and services. Each of these bags, donated by local shops and businesses, local individuals and members of the Women’s Ministry of COTR, will be available to be won at auction the day of this exciting event!“Handbags For Hope,” again will be at the Batesville Middle School commons, 201 N Mulberry St. Registration for the silent-bid auction will begin at 9:30 a.m and the silent-auction begins at 10:00 a.m.Two hundred and ten tickets are available for the event. The cost is $5 each and will include a salad luncheon.A not-for-profit organization, Safe Passage provides individualized case management services to help individuals achieve independence and security; we will assist you in obtaining housing, finding a job, attending school, etc. Safe Passage also provides counseling, support group, domestic violence education, referrals to services and life skills classes on various topics to help you become stronger.For more than 14 years, Safe Passage has continued to primarily serve residents in Dearborn, Franklin, Ohio, Ripley, and Switzerland counties.To make a donation to the auction, to purchase tickets for the even or for more information, contact Carla Thomas, event co-coordinator at (513) 256-8965 or the church at (812) 934-5192last_img read more

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