Category: yasaioflupro

Former dean Hofman dies at 94

first_imgEmil T. Hofman, a professor emeritus of chemistry and former dean of the First Year of Studies who was described as “legendary,” died Saturday, according to a University press release. He was 94.“Emil Hofman, a legendary professor who influenced the lives of generations of students at Notre Dame, was a demanding but caring professor, a dedicated administrator and a man of faith. In many ways, he embodied the spirit of Notre Dame,” University president Fr. John Jenkins said in the release. “My prayers are with his family as we both mourn his passing and celebrate his life and legacy.”Hofman taught freshman level chemistry for 40 years, from 1950 to 1990, totaling more than 32,000 students. Hofman became the dean of what was then the Freshman Year of Studies, and helped oversee the transition to coeducation and the implementation of a comprehensive first-year curriculum that allowed students to explore their interests before choosing a major.He was born in 1921 in Paterson, New Jersey, and served in the Air Force in World War II before using the GI Bill to finance his education at Catholic University and the University of Miami (Fla.), according to the release.Hofman earned a master’s degree from Notre Dame in 1953 and a doctoral degree in 1963, along with an honorary degree in 1990. For nearly 20 years following his retirement in 1990, he would hold “office hours” on a bench outside the Main Building before and after daily mass at the Basilica of the Sacred Heart, according to the release.Tags: chemistry, Emil Hofman, First Year of Studies, FYSlast_img read more

read more

Christopher Fitzgerald Will Return to Chicago on Broadway

first_img Related Shows from $49.50 Chicago also currently stars Bianca Marroquin as Roxie Hart, Amra-Faye Wright as Velma Kelly, Paul C. Vogt as Amos Hart and  Carol Woods as Matron “Mama” Morton. Chicago Christopher Fitzgerald View Commentscenter_img Star Files Fitzgerald picked up Tony nods for his performances in Finian’s Rainbow and Young Frankenstein. Other Broadway credits include Amour, Wicked and The Merchant of Venice. His screen credits include Girl Most Likely, Larry Gaye: Renegade Male Flight Attendant, Personal Velocity and Twins. With a book by Fred Ebb and Bob Fosse, music by John Kander and lyrics by Fred Ebb, Chicago is now the longest-running American musical in Broadway history. The Ambassador Theatre is set to welcome a new silver-tongued Prince of the Courtroom! Christopher Fitzgerald will return to Chicago on Broadway as Billy Flynn beginning August 5. Last October he starred in the production as “Mister Cellophane” Amos Hart. Fitzgerald will take over from Brent Barrett, who played his final performance on July 27.last_img read more

read more

Poultry Outreach

first_imgMike Lacy, professor emeritus and former head of the University of Georgia Department of Poultry Science, has been tapped by the U.S. Department of State to help train agricultural extension agents in South Africa and to provide support to poultry farmers there.Lacy, who retired from UGA in 2016, will travel to South Africa in February 2017 as part of the Department of State’s Fulbright Specialist Program, a sponsored exchange program for academics and professionals.Lacy worked in UGA Cooperative Extension poultry housing research for many years before entering administration. He led outreach trips to African countries throughout his career. In addition to assisting fledgling poultry industries, teams from UGA poultry science worked to build the capacity for rural, smallholder farmers, many of whom are women, to manage small-scale poultry flocks.“Research on improving poultry genetics, reproduction, nutrition, husbandry, disease prevention and marketing especially impacts women in rural areas, who are the primary keepers of small flocks of chickens,” Lacy said. “These women, along with their children, will directly benefit from increased income and improved nutrition.”Lacy will work with the World Poultry Foundation and the KwaZulu-Natal Poultry Institute to provide assistance to historically disadvantaged poultry producers who have faced significant production constraints due to high feed costs, absence of disease control and a severe lack of educational resources.“Our college has one of the finest poultry science departments in the world. Mike Lacy’s scholarship, leadership and service is a big part of that success,” said Sam Pardue, dean and director of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “He is an outstanding choice to lead this important effort to help these struggling farmers.”Lacy will be helping the KwaZulu-Natal Poultry Institute train extension agents to address the needs of small and disadvantaged producers in the country. He will help to teach government extension agents, poultry and egg farmers attending the KwaZulu-Natal Poultry Institute, and will visit farmers in South Africa to provide hands-on instruction and training in the areas of biosecurity, poultry housing, feed quality and conversion rates, disease prevention and egg quality.He will also assist the KwaZulu-Natal Poultry Institute in evaluating their curricula and teaching programs.An overarching goal of the project is to help South African small farmers increase egg and poultry meat production, which will help address protein malnutrition issues in their families and communities.The Fulbright Specialist Program links U.S. scholars and professionals and their counterparts at host institutions overseas. The program awards grants to U.S. faculty and professionals who have been approved to join the roster of specialists in select disciplines in order to engage in short-term collaborative projects at eligible institutions in more than 140 countries worldwide.For more information about the global work being done by faculty in UGA’s poultry science department, visit poultry.uga.edu.last_img read more

read more

College Guide: Tuition Tips & Inspiring Your Teen

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York HELPING STUDENTS PAY FOR COLLEGEWith student debt increasingly becoming a long-term burden on graduates and families, it’s never been more important to minimize the out-of-pocket expenses to put a student through college – and reduce reliance on student loans.The Federal Reserve Bank of New York stated that in 1995, 54 percent of graduates had loans averaging $11,491. It’s more recent data in 2015 showed 71 percent of graduates joined the workforce with student debt averaging slightly more than $35,000. What’s more, The Fed estimates 25 percent of those who owe federal student loans are delinquent or in default.The good news is that anyone willing to put in the time can likely find programs that help foot the bill – helping to reduce the need to take out loans, so a student’s education won’t break the budget or jeopardize a financial future. According to Peter Gayle, a vice president for Prudential Advisors, families can take a few initial steps before choosing a school:* Learn how the financial aid process works and get the most out of options that don’t need to be repaid.* Understand each school’s actual net price – after financial aid – and set realistic expectations, choosing from the most affordable institutions.* Explore types of financial aid, including grants, work study programs and scholarships; examine the specific types of aid available per school and find out how much of a family’s demonstrated financial need each school will cover.* Understand the kinds of loans available, including a variety of federal loans and private loans, which may be used to fill any financing gaps after exhausting other options.* Understand how parents’ “available income” is used to calculate how much parents are expected to contribute to their child’s education, especially for federal financial aid purposes.Several guides, including Prudential Financial’s prudential.com/payingforcollege, can help families take a carefully considered approach to financing a college education while safeguarding a student’s long-term financial future, including the ability to save for retirement. – BPT HOW TO INSPIRE YOUR TEENS TO FIND THEIR MAJORThe high school years can feel overwhelming for students and parents alike. Teens grapple with questions like: Which colleges should I apply to? What do I really want to do with my life?Parents naturally want to give advice and steer them in the right direction, but it’s a tricky balance. It’s their life, after all. So how can parents help?Encourage them to explore different interests. Research extracurricular programs so they can see the breadth of what’s out there. Expose them to a range of possibilities.Most high schools offer a variety of extracurricular opportunities, from sports and theater to robotics and debate. Language clubs provide a chance to practice conversational skills in a relaxed environment while joining in cooking and other cultural activities.If options are limited at school, branch out. Get teens involved in the community, meet new people, and bond with others who share similar interests. They’ll see what’s out there in the bigger world while demonstrating to colleges and employers that they’re engaged beyond the classroom. Volunteering can be customized to one’s own interests, whether it means walking dogs at an animal shelter or building a website for an environmental group.Adventurous students can take it one step further by participating inservice programs abroad. Study abroad transforms the way a teen looks at fields of study – and life. As many students, parents and guidance counselors have discovered, this is an opportune time to develop valuable lifelong skills, learn a new language and discover career interests in a way that is not possible in an everyday classroom environment.The Council on International Educational Exchange (CIEE), a nonprofit that operates high school study abroad programs in more than 30 global destinations, is a good place to start. Transported to a world far different from their own, teens find themselves fully immersed in a new topic and a foreign culture. Programs range from three weeks in the summer to a full semester or academic year.Planning ahead is key. Involve a teacher or counselor in the discussion to ensure a smooth transition. It also allows more time to plan finances and research scholarships. Don’t delay: Organizations like CIEE offer scholarships based on merit and financial considerations, but be sure to check the application deadlines.To learn more about CIEE’s Global Navigator High School Study Abroad program and available scholarships, visit ciee.org/globalnavigators. – BPTlast_img read more

read more

How to create digital trust

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Julie Esser As senior vice president, Julie leads the organization’s marketing and communications strategies, events and communities with effective engagement, development and retention strategies.  Julie brings more than 30 years of … Web: https://www.culedger.com Details The pandemic has not only changed the way we’re currently living our lives and interacting with one another — it has also changed how credit unions serve their members. Delivering exceptional member experience has traditionally consisted of a combination of four components: convenience, ease of use, personalization, and security. There’s now a fifth — safety.  Maintaining and continuing an exceptional service experience comes down to one thing: trust. Trust is the foundation of any relationship. Credit unions have been a trusted financial resource for members since their inception—and that has been the key advantage our industry has over banks and FinTechs. It is ingrained in our industry’s creed as not-for-profit, member-owned cooperatives. This is the credit union difference: deeper, more personal member relationships, better rates and lower fees, and always putting members first.As credit unions expand their digital services, they must once again build a relationship with their members — a trusted relationship that’s digital. Digital trust is earned by instilling member confidence in the ability of the people, technology, and processes your credit union employs to create a secure, private, and reliable digital world. Since the increased digital connection between credit unions and their members’ personal devices can generate an increase in cyber and privacy risks, you can count on scammers and fraudsters to be quick to try and exploit our members’ fears and sense of compassion. We’ve already seen the current COVID-19 crisis spawn a spike in online criminal activity. During the first five months of 2020 alone, cyberattacks on the financial services industry have increased by 238 percent, according to a recent study by VMWare.  Spoofing and impersonation attacks in the call center are two of the most common types of fraud that financial institutions and consumers have experienced an increase of during this pandemic. If members have digital trust, they won’t feel the need to worry about the possibility of being victims of such fraud, even in times of crisis. Protecting and safeguarding your members’ identity will be the key to developing digital trust with your members. Decentralized Identities Equals TrustA decentralized identity creates a faster, more secure method to confirm a member’s identity because it leverages the combination of these technologies—cryptography, biometrics and distributed ledger technology, which is the most secure way to protect credit unions and their members from identity theft and fraud.  One of the main member benefits of decentralized identities is that each individual has full control and ownership over their personal information, an identity model known as self-sovereign.  This privacy-enhanced technology also allows members to selectively disclose personal information, protecting them from divulging more information than necessary to conduct business with their credit union.  The future is quickly moving to self-sovereign identities.  The organization that enables the consumer control over their personal information will enjoy a trusted digital relationship which can last a lifetime.  Your members are counting on you to protect them and being in control of your digital identity can’t come soon enough.  By adopting a KYC-compliant, member-controlled, interoperable digital credential built on the latest in privacy-enhanced technology, your credit union can enhance the digital trust with their members by giving them confidence that their credit union is protecting them and have their best interests at heart—part of what credit unions have done since their inception.Taking the first step toward creating digital trust between your credit union and your members is easy.  To learn more about MemberPass and the Digital Trust Registry, send an email requesting a list of FAQs, register to attend a webinar, or visit www.memberpass.com.CULedger, a credit union service organization, offering MemberPass, the simplest, most secure solution to verify your members through leveraging touchless, privacy-enhancing technology to protect credit unions and their members from identity theft and fraud. Visit www.memberpass.com or email us at sales@memberpass.com.last_img read more

read more

Lucas Moura issues rallying call to Spurs: ‘We cannot lose more points!’

first_imgLucas Moura issues rallying call to Spurs: ‘We cannot lose more points!’ Moura scored Tottenham’s only goal vs Liverpool (Picture: Getty)Lucas Moura has issued a rallying call to his Tottenham team-mates after the club’s 2-1 loss to Liverpool on Sunday.Roberto Firmino opened the scoring for the hosts in the 16th minute, but Moura fired back himself mid-way through the second half.However, the 26-year-old’s effort meant little once Toby Alderweireld accidentally put the ball into the back of his own net in the dying stages.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityThe north London club have now lost four of their last five Premier League fixtures, with their hopes of securing Champions League football for next season now in jeopardy.ADVERTISEMENTMauricio Pochettino’s men remain in third on 61 points, but they are on the same tally as Manchester United in fourth.AdvertisementAdvertisementArsenal and Chelsea aren’t far behind either with both teams also on a tally of 60 points themselves.‘It is very hard to lose like this,’ Moura told Sky Sports after the game. ‘We played very well.More: Manchester United FCRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseEx-Man Utd coach blasts Ed Woodward for two key transfer errors‘At this level of game we cannot make some mistakes and we had chances to win the game. It is difficult. We played very well.‘We cannot lose more points but I am proud of my team-mates.’Tottenham’s next game now is against Crystal Palace at home on April 3.MORE: Pochettino says Liverpool are ‘on a completely different level’Will Tottenham finish in the top four this season?Yes0%No0%Share your resultsShare your resultsTweet your results Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img Metro Sport ReporterSunday 31 Mar 2019 7:01 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link Commentlast_img read more

read more

Asset managers increasingly willing to negotiate on active management fees

first_imgAn increasing number of asset managers are willing to negotiate over performance-based fees, conceding these should only be paid when outperformance is 2 percentage points above the agreed benchmark.In a study conducted by bfinance, the consultancy said it was important for asset owners to ensure their fee structures were not counterproductive, as an absence of fee caps could incentivise managers to take unnecessary risks.It also recommended that asset owners consider a rolling benchmark outperformance as a measure for performance fees, but conceded there had been a trend whereby a “significant” number of active managers were willing to compromise on fees.The report said around one-third of asset managers monitored allowed for a fee structure where outperformance remuneration was only awarded once they exceeded the benchmark by 2 percentage points. “This was not the case when we conducted the same survey three years ago,” the consultancy noted. “The alignment of interests between institutional investors and their managers through performance-based fee elements is a trend that bfinance applauds.”It further found that 22% of active managers would propose a fee structure whereby outperformance was rewarded as soon as a 1 percentage point outperformance occurred.When examining a sample of 100 managers, the report also found little correlation between shortlisted managers and fees initially quoted, therefore recommending that asset owners concentrate on selecting the manager best suited to its demands and later focus on fee negotiations.Ian Shea, head of equities at bfinance, said: “Counter-intuitively, the correlation between high-quality asset management and fees is weak.  “The most adept managers are also those that are most inclined to be competitive on fees and inclined to work with asset owners to find creative performance fee solutions.”Fees paid to managers have become a contentious issue in a number of countries in recent years, with both the Swiss and UK authorities paying greater attention and forcing the disclosure of costs.Dutch pension fund PFZW, meanwhile, has sought to introduce penalty clauses for external managers that underperform.For more on asset management fees and how pension funds are tackling them, see a recent Special Report in IPElast_img read more

read more

First pillar pension reform gets priority in Switzerland

first_imgAt the same time incentives are to be introduced for people to work beyond that age limit.Funding gaps facing the first pillar buffer fund AHV/AVS from 2020 are to be filled by an increase in value-added tax (VAT). The gaps are set to arise as a result of retirements in the baby boomer generation, with a major dip in the buffer fund’s finances due around 2024. The fund is due to run out of assets by the end of 2030 at the latest, according to calculations previously run by Switzerland’s federal social security office.The government also indicated that the ministry of the interior would be arranging talks between employer and employee representatives to discuss a reform of the second pillar.Stakeholders had agreed to negotiations “without any fixed expectations on any outcome”, it said. However, no details or a timetable were given for the reform of this part of the Swiss pension system. This new two-pronged strategy for changes to the Swiss pension system became necessary after the “Altersvorsorge 2020” reform package failed to be accepted in a referendum in September last year. This had addressed the first and second pillars together.If financing by a VAT increase is chosen as the best way to prop up the first pillar buffer fund then this proposal would have to be put to a binding referendum again because any VAT change has to be sanctioned by the voting Swiss population.The government stressed that despite the now two-pronged approach to a reform “the overall goals remain the same”.Those were to: “maintain the current pension pay-out level, ensure sufficient financing of the retirement provision over the medium-term, and better serve the need for flexibility”. The Swiss parliament is to be presented with a reform draft for the first pillar by the end of this year.This means the ministry of the interior will have to come up with a legal draft for consultation before the summer holidays.The Swiss government decided this at the end of last week.The government wants to increase the statutory retirement age for women to 65 to match that of men.last_img read more

read more

Port of Virginia One Step Closer to Deeper Channels

first_imgThe Port of Virginia’s Wider, Deeper, Safer project to deepen and widen the Norfolk Harbor’s commercial shipping channels has secured full federal authorization with this week’s approval by the President of the America’s Water Infrastructure Act of 2018.“The project’s inclusion in the bill clears the path for The Port of Virginia to become the deepest and safest port on the U.S East Coast. The dredge work will take the inner harbor’s commercial channels to 55 feet deep and the channel in the Chesapeake Bay to 56 feet deep. Further, the channel will be widened to as much as 1,400 feet in select areas, which will allow for two-way traffic of ultra-large container vessels. The project’s target completion date is 2025,” the Virginia Port Authority (VPA) said in their latest release.Commenting the news, John F. Reinhart, CEO and executive director of the Virginia Port Authority, said: “Virginia’s inclusion in this legislation will ultimately provide us the means to better serve our ocean carrier customers by allowing them to sail the biggest ships in their fleets to Virginia. When Wider, Deeper, Safer is coupled with the $700 million investment we are making to expand capacity at our main container terminals, cargo owners throughout the Mid-Atlantic and the nation’s Heartland benefit because the speed of exports and imports flowing through Virginia will increase.”The Port of Virginia said that they appreciate the partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the efforts of the entire Virginia Congressional delegation to advance this project and meet the needs of ultra-large container vessels already calling the port.With the support of Gov. Ralph S. Northam and the Virginia General Assembly, the project’s engineering and design is underway with construction scheduled to begin in January 2020.last_img read more

read more

H-Energy to Develop LNG Terminal at India’s Kakinada Port

first_imgIndian natural gas company H-Energy Global has entered into an agreement for the development of an LNG regasification and reloading terminal at Kakinada Port on India’s East Coast.H-Energy will complete the project under a Port Service Agreement (PSA) signed with Kakinada Seaports Limited (KSPL) through its wholly owned subsidiary East Coast Concessions Private Ltd (ECPL).KSPL has the concession for Kakinada Deep Water Port from the government of Andhra Pradesh.As disclosed by the company, the LNG hub at the Kakinada Port will cater to the needs of domestic customers in the state of Andhra Pradesh and is expected to supply LNG through small LNG vessels to H-Energy’s upcoming Kukrahati LNG terminal.“We believe that Kakinada with its existing breakwater and deep draft combined with its close proximity to various natural gas pipeline makes this an efficient and successful project for our customers, our partners, and ourselves,” Darshan Hiranandani, CEO of H-Energy, commented.last_img read more

read more