Category: dpdynuezfuox

McGlinn Hall benefactor dies

first_imgUniversity trustee emeritus and benefactor of McGlinn Hall Terrence J. McGlinn died Sept. 12, the University announced in a press release Thursday. McGlinn was 77.In addition to serving as a member of the Board of Trustees, McGlinn was also a University Fellow, a member of the advisory council for the Mendoza College of Business and a Notre Dame graduate of the class of 1962. According to the press release, the University presented McGlinn with an honorary degree in 2004 for combining “his 50 years of personal perspective on Notre Dame with sharply honed professional expertise” to benefit Notre Dame.“Terry was a beloved member of the Notre Dame family, a wise and trusted adviser and a generous benefactor,” University President Fr. John Jenkins said in the press release. “We mourn his passing, and we hold Bobbie, their children, other family members and his many friends in our prayers.”McGlinn rector Sister Mary Lynch said McGlinn remained committed to McGlinn Hall and its residents since the hall’s opening.“Terry McGlinn loved the women of McGlinn, and was always excited to hear any news about the things we did and the accomplishments that we achieved, and was absolutely very generous to us,” she said. “I mean everybody here always remembers his Christmas gifts every year.”In addition to being the hall’s benefactor, Lynch said McGlinn was also a true friend.“I used to enjoy just talking to him — and we could talk for 40 minutes to an hour about all kinds of things,” she said. “He was always excited to hear that we had won the Kelly Cup, and also any of the teams that would reach the championship points or whatever. He was always thrilled to hear about that, as well as the other accomplishments — sports weren’t just the only thing.”McGlinn’s effort to be involved in the hall community made an impact on the dorm, Lynch said.“He always made a strong connection with us,” she said. “That, to me, was significant. How much he connected and wanted to know and wanted to hear about what we were doing.”Outside of Notre Dame, McGlinn was a general partner of the private investment partnership Walnut Street Associates, worked with several other limited partnerships and was generous with his philanthropic work, according to the press release.McGlinn is survived by his wife, Barbara (Bobbie), and their four children — all of whom are Notre Dame graduates, according to the press release.McGlinn’s family will receive friends at Kuhn Funeral Home in West Reading, Pennsylvania, on Sunday from 4 to 7 p.m., according to the press release, and the funeral will be at St. Ignatius Loyola Church on Monday at 10 a.m.Sports Editor Elizabeth Greason contributed to this report.Tags: McGlinn Halllast_img read more

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Bill Dawes & More Set For The Muscles in Our Toes Off-Broadway

first_img View Comments The complete cast is set for the previously announced New York premiere of Stephen Belber’s The Muscles in Our Toes. Bill Dawes, who recently appeared on Broadway in Bronx Bombers, will star alongside Amir Arison, Nadia Dajani, Samuel Ray Gates, Matthew Maher and Mather Zickel in the Labyrinth Theater Company production helmed by Anne Kauffman. Performances begin June 14 prior to an official opening on June 26 at the Bank Street Theater. In addition to Bronx Bombers, Dawes has appeared on Broadway in Sex & Longing and Lombardi, as well as off-Broadway in Burning Blue, The Exonerated and Ears on a Beatle. Arison’s off-Broadway credits include Aftermath, Why Torture is Wrong, and the People Who Love Them and Queens Boulevard. Dajani made her stage debut in Sophistry at Playwrights Horizons, where she also appeared in Boys and Girls. Gates’ off-Broadway credits include Aunt Dan and Lemon, Three Seconds in the Key and Electra. Maher’s stage credits include Mr. Burns, The Flick and Golden Child; he is also the recipient of the 2013 Obie Award for Sustained Excellence in Performance. Zickel has appeared on screen in Rachel Getting Married and Masters of Sex and on stage in By The Way, Meet Vera Stark and Extraordinary Chambers. The dark comedy will feature lighting design by Japhy Weideman, sets by Lee Savage, costumes by Emily Rebholz and sound design by Jessica Paz. In The Muscles in Our Toes, four friends meet at their high school reunion, and ponder a plan to free their old friend who’s been kidnapped by a radical political group. Absurdity, intensity and plain old weirdness ensue when this inebriated, stoned, adolescently arrested, religiously confused group of friends attempts to tackle the task at hand and at the same time, debate the forces of international terrorism.last_img read more

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Vanessa Hudgens to Headline Workshop of Broadway-Bound Gigi

first_img A re-imagined new production of the 1973 musical by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Lowe, Gigi has been adapted by playwright and Emmy-nominated screenwriter Heidi Thomas. Eric D. Shaeffer will direct the workshop, which will have choreography by Josh Bergasse. A concert version of the show was performed in Seattle earlier this year. Hudgens is best known for playing Gabriella, love interest of Zac Efron’s Troy, in Disney’s High School Musical movies. Recent screen credits include Bandslam and Spring Breakers. She played Mimi in Rent at the Hollywood Bowl in 2010. The cast will also include Steffanie Leigh (Mary Poppins) and Howard McGillin (She Loves Me). Set during the turn of the 20th century, Gigi tells the story of a free-spirited teenage girl living in Paris who is groomed (in the custom of her family) to serve as a companion to a bored, wealthy playboy until the pair realize they have fallen in love. The musical is based on Colette’s classic novella, the 1951 play by Anita Loos and the 1958 movie musical of the same name. The big screen adaptation of Gigi garnered a then-record-setting nine Oscars, including Best Picture. Victoria Clark View Comments Star Files The new Great White Way headed production is a re-imagined reboot of the 1973 musical, which played 103 performances on Broadway. Starring Karin Wolfe as Gigi and Daniel Massey as Gaston, the production earned a Tony Award for Best Original Score. Gigi features the memorable tunes “Thank Heaven For Little Girls,” “I Remember It Well,” “The Night They Invented Champagne,” “It’s a Bore,” and more. High School Musical star Vanessa Hudgens, along with Broadway favorites Corey Cott (Newsies), Kate Burton (Spring Awakening) and Victoria Clark (Cinderella), will perform in an industry reading of Gigi late in July in New York. As previously reported, the tuner is scheduled to open at the Kennedy Center in January 2015 and is eyeing a transfer to the Great White Way later next year. Corey Cottlast_img read more

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How is your credit union working to build its next generation of members?

first_img 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Bolun Li Bolun Li is a Junior at Duke University majoring in Economics. He is a serial entrepreneur and was awarded AACYF 30 under 30 in 2018 for his previous startup. Today, … Web: https://www.zogofinance.com Details Publisher’s Note: CUInsight is hosting a free webinar Wednesday, June 17 titled, Three Ways to Reach Young Members During COVID-19. We hope you’ll join us! Register here.This past year, we walked around campus at UNC-Chapel Hill and asked about 20 different college students if they knew what a credit union was. Most of them said no.Here’s what they said — you can also watch it in the video above:“I’ve heard of credit unions, I just never really knew what they were. I know it’s something to do with finance?”“I know we have a lot. I don’t know what they’re doing, like what they’re used for. But I think it’s more or less to help loans and stuff?… I don’t know.”“I don’t know, like groups of people that help bring up your credit?”After they gave their best guess, we read them a description:“Credit unions are like banks, but they’re non-profit. So when you open an account at a credit union, you become a member and you own part of that credit union. So while traditional banks are run by shareholders, whose goal is to maximize profits, credit unions return all profits to their members in the form of reduced fees, higher savings rates and lower loans rates.”Then we asked them — given that description, would you open an account with a credit union?Nearly all of them said yes.The average age of a credit union member is 47 years old. What will that number be in five years? 10? 20?Flip phones, photo labs and floppy disk drives used to be essential. Now they’ve become obsolete in the rapid waves of change that have characterized the twenty-first century. We have to make sure that credit unions don’t also fall behind — and for that, we need more young people engaged in the credit union movement.At Zogo, we believe in providing young people with the tools and knowledge they need to work toward financial freedom — and it’s important to connect them with the financial institutions that will help them do it.On June 17, Zogo and CUInsight are partnering to present a free webinar, “Three Ways to Reach Young Members During COVID-19.” Our CEO — just a few months out of college himself — will tackle the topic using Zogo’s real-life research and experience with Gen Z.How is your credit union working to build its next generation of members?Don’t forget to join CUInsight and Zogo for our free webinar titled Three Ways to Reach Young Members During COVID-19, on Wednesday, June 17. Register yourself and a colleague here.last_img read more

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Sex change surgery policy ‘nutty’

first_imgOneNews 19 May 2015“Absolutely nuts” is how a Labour Party grassroots call for free sex change surgery has been labelled.ONE News revealed today two regional party conferences have passed a remit to make the expensive surgery available and free.The surgery can cost up to $120,000 and only four are funded every two years. Seventy three people are on the waiting list.Health Minister Jonathan Coleman said the call is “absolutely nuts” and “shows just how disconnected from reality the Labour Party is.”ONE News asked Labour Party MPs if they would support free gender-reassignment surgery, and most said they hadn’t given it much thought.Napier MP Stuart Nash said he voted against the remit at his party conference.“Never once in Napier has anyone ever said they’re not going to vote for Labour because we’re not funding gender-realignment surgery so for me it’s not an issue that’s important for the people of Napier,” he said.Labour Party leader Andrew Little looked surprised when asked about it and said “it’s not an issue I’ve given a great deal of thought to”.“I’m quite happy with my gender,” he said.But he didn’t rule it out saying, “It’s a complex issue and I think it’s not an issue that I’d make a policy up on the hoof”.A party insider told ONE News “this is a distraction”.The insider said “if the party wants any chance of winning in 2017 it needs to concentrate on the economy and future of work”.http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/absolutely-nuts-health-minister-slams-labour-s-free-sex-change-surgery-idea-6315588Sex change surgery policy ‘nutty’Stuff co.nz 19 May 2015A possible Labour Party policy for free gender reassignment surgery has been dismissed as “nutty” by the Government.The Labour Party could end up voting on the policy for free gender reassignment surgery after the idea was passed at two regional party conferences.Labour’s general secretary Tim Barnett said the proposal came from Young Labour, who want to ensure there’s access to hormone replacement therapy and gender reassignment surgery and that it’s publicly funded.But the Government has dismissed the idea, with Health Minister Jonathan Coleman describing the idea as “nutty”.http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/68670002/labour-considers-free-gender-reassignment-surgerylast_img read more

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Gov. Holcomb announces contact tracing plan for COVID-19 cases

first_imgStatewide—Wednesday, Governor Eric J. Holcomb announced the state is partnering with Maximus to centralize contact tracing and investigations for Hoosiers who test positive for COVID-19. This move, in tandem with a previously announced partnership with Optum to significantly expand testing across the state, is an essential component of efforts to safely reopen Indiana.Contact tracing involves identifying individuals who have tested positive for an illness and asking questions about who they were in contact with during their infectious period, then notifying those close contacts of their exposure. Historically, local health departments have led this function, with assistance from the Indiana State Department of Health when requested.Plans call for hiring at least 500 employees, who will be trained in contact tracing and investigations by ISDH subject matter experts. The call center is expected to be operational around May 11.last_img read more

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NPFL: Rivers United, Lobi Stars go joint top

first_imgRelatedPosts NPFL: Coach Dogo leaves Sunshine Stars NFF sanctions NPFL 2019/2020 final table Rivers United again reject Point-Per-Game format Goals from Esor Nelson and Malachi Ohawume proved decisive for Rivers United in their 2-1 victory over Lobi Stars in the Nigeria Professional Football League on Wednesday. United started briskly and scored with their first real attack with pint-sized terror Nelson heading with precision off a Konan N’gouan cross in the second minute. The hosts continued to enjoy the better of the opening exchanges but Lobi looked to hit on the break at every opportunity. They (Lobi) finally struck United’s underbelly and it was a thing of beauty. Omotayo Adebogun produced an outrageous 25-yard pass which completely carved open the Rivers United defence and the overlapping John Lazarus latched onto the brilliant delivery before providing a finish to match to level matters at a frenzied Yakubu Gowon Stadium, Port Harcourt. United then retook the initiative, creating chances at will and coming close on no less than two occasions to retaking the lead. Stephen Gopey hit both posts for the hosts before Esor was denied by a goal line clearance just before the break. It was then left for Ohawume to apply the decisive contribution with 17 minutes remaining to propel United to joint top of the division. Technical manager of the Port Harcourt club, Stanley Eguma, spoke to the club’s official website after the game. “The stakes are quite high at this stage of the season and we gave our best which gave us the victory today,” Eguma said. Rivers United are now joint top of the NPFL standings with 27 points from 15 matches. The ‘Pride Of Rivers’ will next travel to Kano to face Jagawa Golden Stars on January 19.Tags: Esor NelsonKonan N’gouanLobi StarsMalachi OhawumenpflRivers Unitedlast_img read more

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Culture shock: Tradition on reservation forces some to choose between home, unfamiliar territory

first_img‘What this has done is make students say that they don’t care if nobody helps them or believes in them,’ Jones said. ‘They say, ‘Syracuse University says I can go to college.’ You wouldn’t believe the difference it has made in all our Nations.’ ‘We need our own people doing these things,’ he said. ‘We shouldn’t be looking to the outside.’ Published on April 26, 2010 at 12:00 pm Freeman Bucktooth, the Redhawks’ assistant coach, watches the team with emotions ranging from frustration to sadness. His son Brett played lacrosse at Syracuse from 2003-06. He sees players on the Redhawks who could have excelled in college lacrosse but couldn’t conquer the academic hurdle. ‘They never had a chance,’ he says, shaking his head. ‘We have to be very respectful of autonomy,’ Cantor said. ‘We don’t want it to look like we are appropriating their culture. It has to happen naturally.’ More importantly, Jones said, they need educated people to ensure the Onondagas do not lose any more land or rights. It’s as if the sticks are an extension of their hands. The ball zips around the box so fast it’s tough to follow the action. There is likely enough ability here to draft a Division I lineup, but a majority of the players remain unknown to the average fan. It is starting to. Cantor said she feels a mutual trust forming, but it will be a long process that cannot happen in just three years.  The Onondagas value history and family above all, and they have remained private and protective of their culture. Their commitment to these ideals has allowed them to survive while other Native American nations have disappeared. Though he started in the LaFayette district in fifth grade, he did not realize he needed to maintain certain grades to play lacrosse in college. He knew nothing about the NCAA Clearinghouse until it was too late. Change comes slowly on the Onondaga Nation. The attitudes and beliefs have been the same for thousands of years. But expectations are changing. Native American students are starting to believe they can go to college. Haudenosaunee communities have mistrusted American education for decades, dating to the turn of the 20th century, when the U.S. government forced Native children off the reservation and into boarding schools.  And sometimes even that isn’t enough. Only the most dedicated and determined players, such as Thompson and Jamieson, fight through the barriers. The rest slip through the cracks. ‘Jeremy sat there and wondered, ‘Why am I here?” Jones said. ‘My answer was, ‘Get your degree. You can do whatever you want after that. You can go learn your language, you can spend time with your elders, learn how to do ceremonies. You can have both.”  Decades of exploitation and abuse created an intense skepticism of the American educational system. This mistrust led to apathy and a general lack of knowledge about how to even pursue an education off the reservation.  As a result, there are countless Native lacrosse players who never made it to college. Syracuse’s current roster contains two: Cody Jamieson and Jeremy Thompson, who both faced difficult roads before arriving. The LaFayette administration is trying to combat this problem. Principal Paula Cowling and O’Mara started an advisory board intended for Native parents to ask questions about the college process. The most common request was to start teaching about the Clearinghouse at a younger age. Comments Even for lacrosse players who reach college, it is sometimes difficult to find the motivation to continue. When he arrived on campus, Thompson said he felt lost and confused — caught between the two worlds. He wanted to keep playing lacrosse, but the safety and comfort of his life on the Nation beckoned. No longer does education seem unattainable. Bucktooth did not consider college until his junior year of high school, when former SU lacrosse coach Roy Simmons Jr. offered him a scholarship. That, he says, will not happen anymore because the Promise has firmly planted the notion in the minds of Native American children. Then he looks across the arena. A group of elementary school children are fiddling with their lacrosse sticks. A smile crosses his face. ‘They have a chance,’ Bucktooth says with a glimmer of hope and pride in his voice. ‘They will go to college. Things are going to change.’ The scholarship has already been a shift in attitude regarding college. Bucktooth says the Native communities consider Cantor a hero. ‘I didn’t like school too much,’ Abrams said. ‘It was hard. I couldn’t balance the work and lacrosse.’ Even as skepticism has started to wane, many Native families are still unaware of the steps required to go to college. Thompson needed a year at Onondaga Community College, a season of box lacrosse in Canada and then another year at OCC before he was cleared to play at SU.  During an interview earlier this month, Jones pointed out a Native American student’s science project that sought to compare the effects of rain water versus bottled water on plant growth. The pots were marked ‘sky water’ and ‘The Man’s water.’  Danielle O’Mara, the Native American liaison to the LaFayette district, said this ‘generational trauma’ will never completely disappear. ‘If it comes down to community and family versus education, it’s going to be community and family, no questions asked,’ said Regina Jones, an assistant director in SU’s Office of Multicultural Affairs who also runs the Native Student Program.center_img To understand why so few Native American students go to college is to dissect a culture that has lived in this area for thousands of years. A collection of some of the region’s finest lacrosse players gathers twice a week at the Onondaga Nation Arena to honor its heritage. The Haudenosaunee people consider lacrosse the Creator’s game. These men treat it with the deference and respect required to transcend sport into religion.It’s a typical Thursday night, and the Onondaga Redhawks are practicing. The players are between the ages of 21 and 35. Watching them is a revelation. Their style lacks the organization — or is it stuffiness? — of the game played at the Carrier Dome. But they compensate for it with grace and natural ability. Cantor is quick to point out that the scholarship is not an entitlement, but a way to honor the growing relationship between SU and the nearby Native communities. To be eligible for the Promise, a student must be a certified citizen of one of the six Haudenosaunee nations: Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca or Tuscarora. More importantly, the students must meet Syracuse’s admission requirements and standards. ‘We’re always going to mistrust the United States,’ Jones said. ‘We’re going to mistrust people that aren’t Native. That goes back generations. It’s part of who we are.’ That inherent mistrust makes Cantor’s job even more difficult. There is a fine line between accessibility and exploitation. That’s why Syracuse University has hesitated to push the benefits of higher education onto younger children.  Cowling said experiences like these are teaching her the motivational power of lacrosse on Native students.  Lacrosse is still the easiest avenue for Native American students to go to college. But it seems that umbrella is starting to spread beyond athletics. Jones constantly explains to the students that the reservation needs educated people. It will always be difficult. There will always be a clash between two worlds. The key is finding a way to combine the two into something meaningful. Thompson, like many Native American students, wants to spend his life on the reservation. College hasn’t always seemed necessary or worthwhile. Perhaps the most challenging part of Jones’ job is convincing students like Thompson to remain in school. She believes it is possible to combine education with Native customs. Difficult, but possible. Tom Turner, Thompson’s former special education teacher at LaFayette, called lacrosse the ‘greatest carrot dangling in front of these kids to get them into college.’ SU lacrosse coach John Desko delivers a similar message to his Native players. During the fall semester of 2008, former SU defender Sid Smith came into his office and said he was quitting the program. College was too difficult. He needed to be back on the reservation with his family. ‘I said, ‘Sid, you don’t understand what you represent to your people and your culture,” Desko said. ‘You can do both. I told him to keep going to class, and we’re going to find a way to get you graduated.’ Smith, Thompson and all the Native players who have made it to college represent possibility. Desko said former players have been the best tools to inspire younger Native American students to pursue a college education, and he expects them to become more integral moving forward. Mike Abrams, a member of the Redhawks, falls in that category. His brother Marshall played at SU from 1997-00. Mike played two years at Herkimer Community College but did not pursue an opportunity to continue his career. He instead left school to become an iron worker with his father.  Onondaga is a sovereign nation of roughly 2,000 people living on 7,300 acres of land just 10 minutes from the Syracuse University campus. They are one of six groups that comprise the Haudenosaunees, better known in the United States as the Iroquois. They are also one of the few Native communities that still have traditional chiefs, faithkeepers and clan mothers. The Onondagas recently installed a waterline on the Nation. Abrams said they had to hire outside engineers because there weren’t Native engineers to do the job. Despite their talent, almost nobody on the team played collegiate lacrosse. Or went to college at all. ‘They still need to take an active role to make sure they are checking the website, taking the right courses, making sure they’re passing,’ O’Mara said. ‘We can show them everything, we can give them all the information, but it is still up to that child to do what he has to do.’ But there is now a growing belief on the Nation that educational opportunities are coming. It has been four years since Chancellor Nancy Cantor created the Haudenosaunee Promise, a scholarship program allowing Native students who meet certain criteria to attend SU for free. Smith heeded his coach’s words and played an integral part of SU’s national championship runs in 2008 and 2009. He remained in school this year after exhausting his NCAA eligibility, and Desko said he expects Smith to graduate in May.  ‘Our values and our culture are our foundation,’ Jones said. ‘No matter what you learn, no matter what you know, you carry those values with you. That will never change.’ jediamon@syr.edu ‘A lot of them never come back,’ said Neal Powless, a counselor for the SU Center for Career Services and a Redhawks player. ‘When they come back they’re different. They don’t know what it means to be Native.’ Nowadays, the Onondaga Nation feeds into the LaFayette public school district. The combined junior and senior high school has 400 students altogether. Approximately 25 percent of them are Native. The Onondaga Nation School, an all-Native K-8 building on the reservation, is also considered part of LaFayette’s district.  Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Football: Top recruits, developing talent leave Badgers primed to reload in key positions for 2020 season

first_imgAs the 2020 NFL draft approaches at the end of next month, Badgers Jonathan Taylor, Zack Baun, Chris Orr and a few others look to take their talents to the pros and earn a spot on an NFL roster. Each major media platform projects that these three will each get selected to a team, but for the Badgers, who will replace them next season is the bigger question. Jonathan Taylor and the running back core:After having another stand out season and earning the Doak Walker award yet again, Taylor has faced mild criticism for his ball security troubles — he fumbled six times last season, including one in a crucial spot during the Rose Bowl. Along with this, his durability at the next level has also been fairly questioned. With 6,174 career rushing yards on 926 carries, it is understandable to question how much wear and tear could affect his long term success, though Taylor never missed a game with an injury in his three-year playing career. Football: Look at Jonathan Taylor’s draft stock before NFL DraftRunning back Jonathan Taylor has been a crucial piece of Wisconsin’s offense for the past three seasons, making the decision Read…While this may sound like an irrational fear from the pro scouts after he ran a 4.39 second 40-yard dash at the NFL combine, teams can easily point to Todd Gurley as an example of how injury can quickly ruin a top prospect’s capabilities. Gurley — selected 10th overall by the Rams in the 2015 draft — has played five seasons in the NFL, three of which were Pro-Bowl caliber seasons. The catch is that Gurley’s knees caused him to get cut by the Rams this offseason, two years after signing a $60 million contract extension. There is at least some potential that this could be the case with Taylor after his extensive use throughout his college career with the Badgers.This offseason, it will be interesting to watch how the running back room shakes out over the coming months. Many expect the backfield to be a group effort with no stand out back on the depth chart. Garrett Groshek is returning for his senior season and will likely be used mainly through the passing game as the most experienced Badger in the platoon. Also returning is soon-to-be-redshirt sophomore Nakia Watson. Watson struggled last season reading the blockers in front of him when he would relieve Taylor. Yet, he showed some flashes of explosiveness that he needs to keep consistent on every down if he is to become the next premier Badger running back. Football: Look at 2020 football recruitment class following National Signing DayFollowing the University of Wisconsin football team’s close Rose Bowl loss to Oregon, the team is looking ahead to next Read…His development this offseason is crucial in deciding his touches for the coming year with such a deep group. On top of this, with Julius Davis and four-star recruit Jalen Berger entering the conversation this season, don’t be surprised if you see some new faces carrying the ball this season. Chris Orr and the inside linebackers:In his final season with the Badgers, Orr totaled 11.5 sacks and 78 total tackles, enough to get him noticed and scouted by those at the highest level. A high motor and ability to pursue the ball successfully earned Orr a pro day. Due to Orr being undersized for an NFL middle linebacker at just six feet tall, Orr is largely projected to either get taken in the late rounds or get scooped up by a team after the draft and tryout as an undrafted rookie. Set to fill the hole Orr left, rising sophomore Leo Chenal has a chance to do everything Orr did and possibly better. In 11 games played last season, Chenal showed off his explosiveness. His physicality and size will give the Badgers’ defense the force they need to fill following Orr’s departure. Football: Look at Chris Orr’s draft stock before April’s NFL DraftThe University of Wisconsin football team had a better-than-expected 2019 season and much of their success can be credited to Read…Analogous to the quarterback of the defense, Orr was the squad’s leader. Rising junior Jack Sanborn will be able to fill the loss of leadership and potentially serve as a mentor to Chenal throughout the season. Those two should work well together starting, feeding off of each other’s energy and helping fill the spots the other lacks. Zack Baun and the outside linebackers: Earning All-American honors and totaling 76 tackles, including 19.5 for loss and 12.5 sacks in just his second year as a starter, Baun’s draft stock rose heavily. Known for his speed and versatility as a pass rusher, his upside is immense. Already rated as ESPN’s number two outside linebacker, Baun would be well served to put on some size without losing his elite speed. Arguably the deepest position for the Badgers this season on paper, the defense needs one player to step up and fill Baun’s absence. Opposite of Baun, Noah Burks was a solid player, and if he continues to perform at the level he did last season, he will remain a key contributor. There are also two four-star recruits joining the OLB rotation this season in Nick Herbig and Kaden Johnson. If they develop as well as other Badger linebackers in the past, expect these two to see some major playing time this season. Football: Look at Zack Baun’s draft stock with April’s NFL Draft only weeks awayThe University of Wisconsin football team cranks out NFL-caliber players at an above-average level compared to other teams in college Read…All things considered, things are looking up for the Badgers, even as they say farewell to multiple key players from their 2019 season. With a bit of development and some reliable Wisconsin coaching, the Badgers could be in for another successful season in the Big Ten and beyond.last_img read more

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