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Author examines language of nuclear destruction

first_imgArthur Binard, a bilingual author, translator and antinuclear activist, delivered a lecture Monday afternoon in the LaFortune Center Ballroom that examined the terminology Japanese and Americans use to describe the bombings of Japan during World War II. At the end of the war, there was a general feeling of euphoria in the United States, but in Japan, the feeling could not have been more different — Hiroshima and Nagasaki were leveled by nuclear weapons, and the Japanese people dealt with the crippling effects of the destruction of two large cities.Binard, who has lived in Japan for more than 20 years, said he set about to discover how the language both the American and Japanese people use in discussing this event shape their perspective on the event itself. The interest started for Binard with a trip to the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, he said, and a talk from a survivor of the atomic bomb.When describing the bomb, Binard said the survivor used the word “pika,” a word which roughly translated to “shiny” or “bright,” to describe the explosion. Binard said he had never heard this word before and, “pika gave a strong sense of the event.”As a result of describing the bomb in terms of light, and not as the mushroom cloud with which he had traditionally associated it, Binard said he began questioning the narrative of the bombing that he had been taught in school. Using the mushroom cloud as the main descriptor of the bomb has profoundly impacted Americans’ views of the event, as they are detached from the destruction itself, he said. “Using the mushroom cloud puts us above [the incident],” Binard said. “[In Japan,] nobody talked about the mushroom cloud.”Binard said he discovered that the Japanese almost exclusively used “pika” in describing the bombing, and this new narrative, not of the necessity of the bomb but the destruction that it created, made Binard shift his perspective on the use of the bomb. “I should have been with them all along,” Binard said, “but I wasn’t before because I didn’t have ‘pika.’” This discovery led Binard to further examine how the use of language impacts our view of the nuclear bomb and nuclear power. In his examination, Binard said he found examples in both Japan and the United States where the use of language seemed seemed to tame, in the minds of the general population, the negative effects of the nuclear bomb and nuclear power.According to Binard, the language used to describe an event impacts public perception of the event and when examining an event, one must alway consider how it is described.“All the language you use always has some perspective,” he said.Tags: Hiroshima, japan, Poetrylast_img read more

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Sophisticated flight simulator helps Costa Rican SVA pilots fight organized crime

first_img SVA plays a key role in providing security for Costa Rica For example, Costa Rica currently receives aid from the U.S. government through various programs. From 2009 to September 11, Costa Rica received more than $25 million (USD) in assistance to support border security, judicial processes, and safe communities. The equipment is located in the facilities of the aerial section of the Department of Public Security at Juan Santamaría International Airport (AIJS), in Alajuela. The equipment is located in the facilities of the aerial section of the Department of Public Security at Juan Santamaría International Airport (AIJS), in Alajuela. Cooperation includes training That task falls to SVA’s aircraft maintenance department, which is comprised of 11 technical mechanics who are responsible for certifying the safety of SVA aircraft – including some which were seized from drug traffickers. By Dialogo November 14, 2014 “I want to thank our friends in the United States government for being our partners in this initiative,” said Minister of Public Security Celso Gamboa Sánchez. “This is the best flight simulator currently in Costa Rica and it makes the Ministry of Public Security a technological leader.” “This simulator was a real necessity,” said Paul Chávez, a security analyst at the Latin University of Costa Rica. “This simulator was a real necessity,” said Paul Chávez, a security analyst at the Latin University of Costa Rica. Cooperation includes training The Costa Rican Aerial Surveillance Service (SVA) has an important new tool in its fight against drug trafficking and other criminal enterprises: A Piper Seneca III Flight Simulator that pilots can use for training. The SVA fleet is comprised of 17 aircraft, including 14 fixed-wing planes and 3 helicopters. Its fleet was entirely donated by other countries or confiscated from drug traffickers. Each seized aircraft is worth between $15 million and $30 million (USD). That task falls to SVA’s aircraft maintenance department, which is comprised of 11 technical mechanics who are responsible for certifying the safety of SVA aircraft – including some which were seized from drug traffickers. Costa Rica does not have a military force, so the SVA plays a key role in ensuring the country’s public safety. It serves as the airborne branch of the country’s police force, and is responsible for ensuring public order, the safety and integrity of Costa Rican air space, surveillance, transporting public officials domestically and internationally, and responding to public emergencies, such as natural disasters. The Costa Rican Aerial Surveillance Service (SVA) has an important new tool in its fight against drug trafficking and other criminal enterprises: A Piper Seneca III Flight Simulator that pilots can use for training. Flight simulator an important training tool The Piper Seneca III will allow the SVA’s 30 pilots to maintain and sharpen their skills on a daily basis. It’s the first simulator for SVA police pilots, featuring a replica of an actual aircraft cabin and equipped with sophisticated technology that simulates real-life scenarios. The simulator will allow them to hone their professional skills and abilities without risking planes in an actual fight and without expending fuel or polluting the environment. SVA pilots conduct surveillance flights to monitor organized crime groups and common criminals, and also fly humanitarian missions to help the civilian population during natural disasters. Flight simulator an important training tool Costa Rica does not have a military force, so the SVA plays a key role in ensuring the country’s public safety. It serves as the airborne branch of the country’s police force, and is responsible for ensuring public order, the safety and integrity of Costa Rican air space, surveillance, transporting public officials domestically and internationally, and responding to public emergencies, such as natural disasters. The SVA fleet is comprised of 17 aircraft, including 14 fixed-wing planes and 3 helicopters. Its fleet was entirely donated by other countries or confiscated from drug traffickers. Each seized aircraft is worth between $15 million and $30 million (USD). “I want to thank our friends in the United States government for being our partners in this initiative,” said Minister of Public Security Celso Gamboa Sánchez. “This is the best flight simulator currently in Costa Rica and it makes the Ministry of Public Security a technological leader.” The flight simulator joins the array of sophisticated technology, such as radar systems, that the SVA uses to conduct maritime patrols — often in cooperation with U.S. security forces. The Piper Seneca III will allow the SVA’s 30 pilots to maintain and sharpen their skills on a daily basis. It’s the first simulator for SVA police pilots, featuring a replica of an actual aircraft cabin and equipped with sophisticated technology that simulates real-life scenarios. The simulator will allow them to hone their professional skills and abilities without risking planes in an actual fight and without expending fuel or polluting the environment. The flight simulator joins the array of sophisticated technology, such as radar systems, that the SVA uses to conduct maritime patrols — often in cooperation with U.S. security forces. In addition to donating the device, USSOUTHCOM trained SVA technical personnel how to maintain it. In addition to donating the device, USSOUTHCOM trained SVA technical personnel how to maintain it. The device will help pilots train to perform difficult maneuvers, such as landing in remote rural areas where there is no airport or landing strip. And flight hours in the simulator will be recognized for pilot certifications. The device will help pilots train to perform difficult maneuvers, such as landing in remote rural areas where there is no airport or landing strip. And flight hours in the simulator will be recognized for pilot certifications. The United States Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) delivered the donated flight simulator, worth about US $305,000, to SVA headquarters, the Ministry of Public Security announced October 15. SVA plays a key role in providing security for Costa Rica SVA pilots conduct surveillance flights to monitor organized crime groups and common criminals, and also fly humanitarian missions to help the civilian population during natural disasters. For example, Costa Rica currently receives aid from the U.S. government through various programs. From 2009 to September 11, Costa Rica received more than $25 million (USD) in assistance to support border security, judicial processes, and safe communities. The United States and Costa Rica cooperate in the fight against transnational criminal enterprises, primarily by sharing information and resources. The United States Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) delivered the donated flight simulator, worth about US $305,000, to SVA headquarters, the Ministry of Public Security announced October 15. The United States and Costa Rica cooperate in the fight against transnational criminal enterprises, primarily by sharing information and resources. last_img read more

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Failure to communicate

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Earlier this month, I was traveling to the Bank Social conference in Miami. I’d known before I even left my house that morning to head to the airport that the weather was potentially going to be an issue. I had no idea how much.Without getting into all the details (diverted flights, 10+ hours of delays), let me just say it wasn’t my best travel day. I tried to keep my calm because it was weather related but the day was long and I never really knew what was going on as flights were rescheduled and gates were changed.I started speaking to two other weary travelers who were at my gate. One was coming from Paris and the other from New York City. The three of us had all been traveling for over 12 hours. One of us had crossed an ocean, one of us (raising my hand here) was less than 200 miles from home. The thing that all of us agreed on? None of the issues would have been as frustrating if someone just communicated with us. We all had the airline app and access to the website on our devices. But even with all that technology, none of it was as useful or reassuring to us as a real, live person giving us an update. As we sat at our new gate, one of my long-suffering travel mates said “Just pick up the microphone and tell us what’s going on. All we’re asking for is a little communication.” continue reading »last_img read more

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Doors opening

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COVID-19: Government calls for limits to all tourist activities

first_imgPresident Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has urged Indonesians to practice social distancing, or staying far enough away from each other to avoid infection and to slow the spread of the disease, by “working from home, studying from home and worshiping from home”.Read also: COVID-19: Patchy response to President’s call to work from homeFor those tourist businesses that remain open, Wishnutama urged operators to limit operational hours, numbers of visitors and to implement health checks at entrances.“One of the ways is by ensuring sanitation by providing access to washing hands using running water and antiseptic soap, providing tissues or masks and disinfecting all facilities. Apart from those, provide body temperature thermometers,” the minister said. The government has finally called for the suspension of meeting, incentive, convention and exhibition (MICE) activities, after previously trying to promote a tourist sector severely hit by the COVID-19 pandemic.Tourism and Creative Economy Minister Wishnutama Kusubandio said on Tuesday that now the priority was protecting health, safety and lives amid the spread of the novel coronavirus.“For the time being, limit activities that promote tourism and the creative economy. [We] also urge tourism and creative economy industry players not to organize meetings, incentives, conventions or exhibitions until the COVID-19 pandemic has been contained in accordance with the government’s instructions,” Wishnutama said in a press statement. Wishnutama appreciated the fast response taken by several regional governments and industry players who had decided to cancel or postpone activities or events. “We urge the public not to travel if not necessary, except for urgent needs, to implement social distancing, maintain hygiene and implement a healthy lifestyle,” he added.In the meantime, he said, businesses needed to actively participate in fighting the COVID-19 spread and the ministry would take advantage of downtime to plan strategies to promote tourism to benefit the people and national economy after recovery.Wishnutama’s message was a change of tone from earlier messages that the government would provide a fiscal stimulus to promote tourism, as part of the first Rp 10.2 trillion (US$ 671.8 million) stimulus package.The government has canceled all promotional plans, including channeling funds to influencers and promotions to attract foreign tourists, and instead will focus on providing tax breaks to tourism players as unveiled during the second stimulus package.Read also: Government allocates $8b to stimulate economy as businesses, workers suffer from COVID-19 impactsCOVID-19 has hit hard the tourist and creative economy sectors. Chairman of the Indonesia Hotel and Restaurant Association (PHRI) Hariyadi B. Sukamdani previously said Indonesian tourism had suffered losses of at least $1.5 billion since January as cancelations hit the industry, especially hotels, amid growing fears over the outbreak of the novel coronavirus.“The losses are growing as people prefer to stay at home rather than going on vacation,” Hariyadi, who also chairs the Indonesia Employer’s Association (Apindo), said in Jakarta on March 12.Occupancy rates at some hotels have dropped as low as 20 percent, according to the PHRI. Bali, Jakarta, Manado in North Sulawesi and Batam and Bintan in Riau Islands are currently the worst-hit areas.Topics :last_img read more

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MMA Offshore buying Neptune Marine Services

first_imgAustralian offshore support vessel company MMA Offshore is set to buy its compatriot offshore services provider Neptune Marine Services.An MMA Offshore vessel / Image source: MMA OffshoreThe two companies have signed a binding agreement whereby MMA Offshore will acquire the offshore inspection, maintenance, and repair specialist Neptune for $18.5 million in total.Of the full sum, MMA Offshore will pay $5 million in cash and issue $13.5 million worth MMA shares to Neptune Marine Services.ASX-listed, Perth-based Neptune services mainly Tier 1 oil and gas, and marine infrastructure clients through its operational centers in Australia, South East Asia and the UK.The company’s key services include asset integrity and inspection; commercial diving; survey and positioning; shallow water ROVs; subsea, pipeline and topside engineering; subsea protection and stabilization, dry underwater welding; and manufacturing, assembly, and testing servicesMMA Offshore’s Managing Director Jeffrey Weber said the Neptune business purchase was an important step in MMA’s strategy to expand its subsea service offering to existing and new clients.He said: “Combining MMA’s vessel assets with NMS’s subsea equipment and technical expertise will result in a stronger service offering to both MMA’s and NMS’s existing clients and provide an opportunity for MMA to capture a greater proportion of the value chain.”“Importantly, the services that NMS provides do not directly compete with our existing clients in the sector, and we continue to see these partnerships as a key platform in our subsea strategy going forward. The acquisition is expected to enhance MMA’s return on assets through packaging value-adding services to our vessels. As the offshore market improves, we expect the combined business to benefit from a recovery in offshore and subsea investment,” Weber said.Neptune Marine Services’ CEO, Robin King, said: “The acquisition of the Neptune business by MMA provides NMS shareholders with an opportunity to retain an exposure to the combined business which offers synergies that will potentially provide new opportunities for the business in any sustained improvement in market conditions. Combining NMS’s subsea equipment and technical expertise with MMA’s vessel assets should result in a stronger service offering toboth NMS’s and MMA’s existing clients.”The transaction is subject to approvals by Neptune’s shareholders at a general meeting in October, and certain other conditions.Neptune’s board has said that the MMA transaction is in the best interests of Neptune and its shareholders in the absence of a superior proposal. The board has recommended that NMS shareholders vote in favor of the transaction at the upcoming general meeting.Offshore Energy Today StaffSpotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

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It’s time to tackle New Zealand’s appalling child homicide record

first_imgEDITORIAL: Stuff co.nz 21 November 2015The long-standing belief that this country is universally a paradise for youngsters has been shattered, revealed as a charade by a Fairfax study of child homicide in New Zealand.We should hang our heads in shame.The heartbreaking photographs on the front of today’s Weekend Press  bring into sharp focus the child abuse happening almost daily on the margins – but not exclusively the margins – of New Zealand society.The data investigation has uncovered the appalling truth about the children who have been abused, neglected and maltreated by parents and caregivers.Collectively we have failed the more than 200 children aged 0-14 who have died from such treatment since 1992, including the dozens of young souls whose photos we feature today, pictured on some of the happy days of their tragically short lives.It is a harrowing series of statistics. Overshadowing the many individual findings is the fact New Zealand is one of the most dangerous countries in which to grow up.A 2007 report by Unicef placed New Zealand last in the OECD in terms of safety for children and teenagers, with 23 deaths due to accidents and other injuries out of every 100,000 under-19 year olds. In comparison, per 100,000, there were 15 in Australia, 12 in Japan and eight in the United Kingdom.A direct comparison of New Zealand’s performance more recently has not been possible as no similar study has since been released. However, it is thought likely that improvement, if any, since 2007 will have been minimal, given trends in other sets of data, including infant mortality rates.So far this year 13 of our children have died suspiciously, four more than the annual average. Auckland’s Starship Hospital reports it is seeing more cases of serious abuse than ever while nationally a child goes into hospital every other day with inflicted injuries, burns, broken bones and head wounds. Worse, that statistic is believed widely under-reported.The fact most child homicide victims are not known to Child, Youth and Family staff is also a sign that abuse cases are falling between the cracks.http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/opinion/74188995/editorial-its-time-to-tackle-new-zealands-appalling-child-homicide-recordlast_img read more

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Doctors say Venezuela’s health care in collapse

first_imgHealthLifestyle Doctors say Venezuela’s health care in collapse by: – November 6, 2013 Share Sharing is caring! Share MARACAY, Venezuela (AP) — Evelina Gonzalez was supposed to undergo cancer surgery in July following chemotherapy but wound up shuttling from hospital to hospital in search of an available operating table. On the crest of her left breast, a mocha-coloured tumor doubled in size and now bulges through her white spandex tank top.Gonzalez is on a list of 31 breast cancer patients waiting to have tumors removed at one of Venezuela’s biggest medical facilities, Maracay’s Central Hospital. But like legions of the sick across the country, she’s been neglected by a health care system doctors say is collapsing after years of deterioration.Doctors at the hospital sent home 300 cancer patients last month when supply shortages and overtaxed equipment made it impossible for them to perform non-emergency surgeries.Driving the crisis in health care are the same forces that have left Venezuelans scrambling to find toilet paper, milk and automobile parts. Economists blame government mismanagement and currency controls set by the late President Hugo Chavez for inflation pushing 50 per cent annually. The government controls the dollars needed to buy medical supplies and has simply not made enough available.“I feel like I’ve been abandoned,” Gonzalez, 37, tells a bright-eyed hospital psychologist trying to boost her morale. Her right eye is swollen by glaucoma diagnosed two years ago but left untreated when she had trouble getting an appointment.Doctors not allied with the government say many patients began dying from easily treatable illnesses when Venezuela’s downward economic slide accelerated after Chavez’s death from cancer in March. Doctors say it’s impossible to know how many have died, and the government doesn’t keep such numbers, just as it hasn’t published health statistics since 2010.Almost everything needed to mend and heal is in critically short supply: needles, syringes and paraffin used in biopsies to diagnose cancer; drugs to treat it; operating room equipment; X-ray film and imaging paper; blood and the reagents needed so it can be used for transfusions.Last month, the government suspended organ donations and transplants. At least 70 per cent of radiotherapy machines, precisely what Gonzalez will need once her tumor is removed, are now inoperable in a country with 19,000 cancer patients — meaning fewer than 5,000 can be treated, said Dr Douglas Natera, president of the Venezuelan Medical Federation.“Two months ago we asked the government to declare an emergency,” said Natera, whose doctors group is the country’s largest. “We got no response.”The Associated Press sought comment from Health Minister Isabel Iturria but her press office did not respond to repeated interview requests.Last week, a deputy health minister, Nimeny Gutierrez, denied on state TV that the system is in crisis, saying supplies are arriving regularly from Cuba, Uruguay, Colombia and Portugal, and additional purchases “will let us be moderately relaxed until the end of the year.”The interviewer read a viewer’s question about Central Hospital patients being forced to buy their own supplies. “It’s a hospital that received permanent stocks from us,” Gutierrez said, promising to investigate.The country’s 1999 constitution guarantees free universal health care to Venezuelans, who sit on the world’s largest proven oil reserves. President Nicolas Maduro’s government insists it’s complying. Yet of the country’s 100 fully functioning public hospitals, nine in 10 have just seven per cent of the supplies they need, Natera said.The other nearly 200 public hospitals that existed when Chavez took office were largely replaced by a system of walk-in clinics run by Cuban doctors that have won praise for delivering preventative care to the neediest but do not treat serious illnesses.The woes are not restricted to the public system.Venezuela’s 400 private hospitals and clinics are overburdened and strapped for supplies, 95 per cent of which must be imported, said Dr Carlos Rosales, president of the association that represents them.The private system has just 8,000 of the country’s more than 50,000 hospital beds but treats 53 per cent of the country’s patients, including the 10 million public employees with health insurance. Rosales said insurers, many state-owned, are four to six months behind in payments and it is nearly impossible to meet payrolls and pay suppliers.Worse, government price caps set in July for common procedures are impossible to meet, Rosales said. For example, dialysis treatment was set at 200 bolivars (US$30 at the official exchange rate and less than US$4 on the black market) for a procedure that costs 5,000 bolivars to administer.“The health care crisis is an economic crisis. It is not a medical crisis,” said Dr. Jose Luis Lopez, who oversees labs at the Municipal Blood Bank of Caracas.Under Chavez, Venezuela began buying most medical equipment through Cuba, China and Argentina. That has led to considerable waste, because it is cheaper to buy direct from the manufacturer, critics say.The Health Ministry’s oncology chief, Dr Morella Rebolledo, said it is negotiating with Argentina maintenance contracts for the idled radiotherapy machines that had lapsed.Back home in San Mateo, a 90-minute bus ride away in a neighborhood where even the dogs look hungry, Evelina Gonzalez sits outside the tin-roofed, plywood-walled two-room shack she shares with her family of five. Because her last chemotherapy was in June, she needs more sessions before surgery, but the drugs are not available and the cancer has reached lymph nodes beneath her armpit.Gonzalez says she adored Chavez for his anti-poverty programs, always voted for him and constantly applied for government benefits, though she never received any.She has a good chance of survival if she gets the right care, Gutierrez said.But that’s not happening.“I’ve got nowhere else to turn,” Gonzalez says.Associated Presscenter_img Share 33 Views   no discussions Tweetlast_img read more

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Uzoho undergoes successful surgery

first_imgRelatedPosts Super Eagles’ goalie Uzoho joins Apoel FC Michael Schumacher to undergo another surgery Austin Ejide dreams Super Eagles recall Nigeria international goalkeeper Francis Uzoho has undergone a successful surgery after sustaining knee ligament damage last month.Uzoho, 20, suffered the injury after the hour mark during the Super Eagles’s 1-1 friendly draw with Brazil in Singapore and had to be carried off on a stretcher.His Cypriot club Omonia Nicosia confirmed the extent of the injury and that the Nigerian was facing an extended lay-off.“And it was a success. I’m grateful to every prayer and good wishes said. Even the hidden prayers said on my behalf,” Uzoho wrote on social media.“I’m deeply grateful. Now let the healing begin.”He is expected to be out for at least six months and the injury comes as a setback for Uzoho, who had regained his starting place and had been picked for both of Nigeria’s most recent friendly internationals against Ukraine and Brazil.In search of regular football, Uzoho had returned for a second loan spell in Cyprus by joining Omonia Nicosia in July from Spanish side Deportivo La Coruna.A lack of top-flight football had cost him his place as Nigeria’s number one keeper ahead of the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations, and consequently went into the tournament as third choice behind Daniel Akpeyi and Ikechukwu Ezenwa.Capped 16 times by Nigeria, he played all three matches as the Super Eagles were knocked out of the 2018 World Cup in the group stage.He made a solitary appearance at this summer’s Nations Cup in the win over Tunisia as the West African nation sealed a third place finish in Egypt.The Super Eagles via her twitter handle @NGSuperEagles has congratulated the goalkeeper on a successful surgery.“Thank God for the successful surgery, now rehabilitation begins. Get well soon@Uzohof.“We can’t wait to have you back.” Tags: CypriotFrancis UzohoOmonia NicosiaSurgerylast_img read more

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Cheap goals frustrate Martinez

first_imgEverton boss Roberto Martinez admits his side must stop conceding “cheap” goals as they look to arrest their slump in results. The Toffees’ 3-2 loss at Newcastle on Sunday was their fifth in seven Barclays Premier League games and their third defeat in a row. Martinez insisted afterwards that Papiss Cisse should have been sent off for an elbow on Everton’s Seamus Coleman in the first half – an incident referee Craig Pawson took no action over, and was shortly followed by the Magpies striker drawing the scores level at 1-1. “He holds the ball up, he gives you a real platform, his intensity in the box to get on the end of crosses is very, very good and to get a goal so early coming back after a long absence is very pleasing. “It’s a reward that he deserves. It’s just a shame that he couldn’t celebrate a good victory with it.” Martinez – whose team are 12th and next face Hull away on New Year’s Day – saw the Toffees fall 3-1 behind after Cisse’s equaliser through goals from Ayoze Perez and Jack Colback before Kevin Mirallas’ late reply. The visitors lost influential midfielder James McCarthy, who has been troubled by hamstring problems, at half-time in the contest. “It was more a precaution,” Martinez said. “James came back from injury on Friday and he was able to play 60 minutes, and after half-time he was hitting a very high risk of injury, so he had to come off.” Press Association However, Martinez also had no doubt his team had made life difficult for themselves with their defending – something for which they have often been criticised this season. And the Spaniard said: “We can’t feel sorry for ourselves – we need to make sure that we get better in what we do. “(For Newcastle’s second and third goal) we gave the ball away when we should have been a bit more cute, showing a bit more maturity. “I know we have got young players in the squad, but it’s an opportunity to learn from those moments. “We can’t just keep giving cheap goals away in that respect because it becomes a harder game.” Martinez was disappointed for Arouna Kone when the Ivory Coast frontman ended up on the losing side at St James’ Park after scoring his maiden goal as an Everton player. Kone, whose spell with the Merseysiders since joining them in the summer of 2013 has been blighted by a long-term knee injury suffered in October that year, netted five minutes into what was his first Premier League start for the club. Martinez said: “You can see what he brings – he’s a completely different striker to the others we have at the club. last_img read more

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