Month: April 2021

Reporting in, Alison Ward, communications director, BCCCA

first_imgIt’s difficult to open the papers without reading another story about the growing obesity problem in the UK. The good news is that the latest data from TNS suggests people are looking to improve their diets, with more people choosing foods for health reasons.Many manufacturers have already responded by offering reduced fat, reduced salt and reduced sugar foods. The sector is also committed to helping people make informed choices by giving more information about the nutrients a particular food contains.Over 85% of the BCCCA sector has committed Guideline Daily Amounts (GDAs). GDAs help people understand how much or how little of a particular nutrient they should be trying to eat and are also an easy way to compare foods.The other trend TNS identifies is indulgence with people looking to treat themselves once in a while. So while there is a market for lower fat biscuits there is also a market for shortbread made with butter and sugar. The TNS data demonstrates that the BCCCA sector is very well understood by consumers, with people clearly understanding if a food is indulgent.In order to facilitate industry best practice the BCCCA holds a Technology Conference with presentations from industry experts. The next conference will continue the focus on consumer health and will consider how the baking sector responds to the sustainability debate.last_img read more

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International activity

first_imgOrganisers of Interbake China 2007 – one of Asia’s largest international bakery exhibitions – say that Western expertise is very much in demand in the country, whether for machines, production, product design or packaging.With a population of 1.3 billion people and annual economic growth of 10% over the past nine years, China has an enormous baking market, which has seen a 14% increase in sales in recent years, according to Cherry Lee, project manager of organiser Canton Universal Fair Group. Market research suggests that the annual consumption level of bakery cake and pastry products has quadrupled since 1994.The 11th Interbake China exhibition focuses on bakery machinery and ingredients including flavours, yeast and other additives, as well as packaging. It aims to provide an opportunity of exchange, promotion and co-operation between countries and exhibitors. The number of exhibitors at Interbake China has increased by more than 30% over the past four years, and with a total area of 36,000 sq m, Interbake China 2006 attracted over 63,072 professional visitors and 632 exhibitors from 62 countries.Companies exhibiting their products and technologies last year included Zeelandia, American Ingredients Company, Sanneng, Kolb, Cargil, Wilson, Denmark Crisp machine, Rich’s, Mike Garden, Sinmag and Sun-mate.Interbake China 2007 will be held in Guangzhou at Guangzhou International Convention and Exhibition Center (GICEC) from 12-14 May, 2007.last_img read more

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Finishing with a flourish

first_imgJaiOn our third day at the Richemont School, we met with eagerness. After breakfast, we continued with our coursework, keen to see the different finishing and presentation of the final products, not to mention the tasting!The final result was an impressive display. It was hard to believe that we had covered such a variety of textures and flavours in just a few short days.The closing ceremony was informal and light-hearted and we had the opportunity to speak to some of the demonstrators and our tutor, Fredy Eggenschwiler, while we sampled the fruits of their labour. We gave our thanks and goodbyes.That evening, Siegfried Bienz invited us to dine with him and introduced us further to Luzern and some of the sights we may have missed. He pointed out some of the more historic buildings, monuments and places of interest, including the Capell bridge and the Lion’s monument. Before dining, we also managed to do a little shopping; Mr Bienz even managed to find me a doll in traditional Swiss costume for my daughter.We were treated to more wonderful scenery while travelling to Mr Bienz’s restaurant of choice, a beautiful lakeside bistro, where the food was fabulous. While we dined, our host explained his plans for our last day in Switzerland.RobertAgain we were up for breakfast awaiting our start at 8.30am. We were joined today by Elvin, the Austrian I mentioned earlier, whose father’s and uncle’s bakery sounded on a similar scale to Thomas the Baker, where I work. I told them about the equipment we use for the production of our breads, savouries and cakes, which interested Elvin, and he and I swapped addresses. Hopefully, we will both visit each others’ bakeries in the near future.In the classroom, first on today’s agenda was meringues and the importance of getting the correct recipe balance of egg whites and sugar. I found this interesting as meringues are part of my ’product development’ back home. The teachers whipped the two meringues up, one white one brown. The brown meringue was made by adding skimmed milk powder. They demonstrated various finishes with the two separate colours, including heart circles, teardrops and strawberries. To finish off, they placed the two bags of mix – one white, one brown – into a piping bag and then began to pipe shapes. This time the effect of the finish looked fantastic with the mixed colours. They also demonstrated how to singe meringues with the burners.Before morning break, Fredy explained how to make the basic syrup, which would be brushed on to your tortes. He stressed the importance of adding alcohol and not liqueur to the syrup as this can make a huge difference to the final product.Next, we discussed gelatine, what types there are – leaf and powder – and the best ways to dissolve it; always use a water bath when dissolving at 40-45?C as the risk of burning would result in bad or peculiar taste.Leading on from this, Fredy talked about creams and fillings (custard). He explained that ordinary whipping cream has a fat content of 35% or above, but for special products with lower energy value, you can use cream with a 25% fat content. Both products should be whipped in a cold environment – for example a whipping machine or mixer in a chilled room. A whipping machine enhances the volume as more air is drawn in. Gelatine is added to cream to help the stability of the product.Fredy discussed the different methods of mixing cream and custard, which led us onto yoghurt or quark creams, boiled fruit creams, butter creams and ganache. He explained how butter cream should not contain egg at any stage if it is to have a good shelf life and that if butter is replaced with alternative fats, then the words “butter cream” cannot be used. Fredy finished off the morning explaining fondants and how to produce them.After lunch, Fredy explained mainly about the different finishes and recipes, which we were going to taste mid-afternoon, including the fillings and recipes for glazes. This gave me the opportunity to write down the recipes, which I hope will be of good use to our company in the future.The cakes and tortes were all set out on a large mirror, there were about 20 different varieties of cakes and 12 tortes to try and I regretted having dessert at lunch. The presentation looked almost too good to eat and the time and effort that had gone into finishing the products could be seen when they were on show. After tasting a small amount of the product, and seeing the care and attention that goes into making them, it is clear why the Richemont School is known throughout the world for being ’the best in the business’Although I learnt so much about confectionery over the last two days, I felt that some of the recipes would not be appropriate in our company, due to the huge amounts of each product that we produce on a daily basis compared to those of the individually hand-finished cakes. nl See BB next week for our final diary instalment from the Richemont School.last_img read more

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Legislation watch

first_imgThe Pensions Bill 2007, which reached its second reading in Parliament last week, could hit the baking industry hard if it becomes law. That’s the view of pensions consultancy Aon, which said the Bill will cost UK companies an extra £4bn, if it is passed.Chris Dale, head of Aon’s food and drink practice, said: “The Pensions Bill could hit the tight margins of the food and drink sector, which will have to provide pensions to a high number of part-time staff. This could see deficits soar at a time when food prices are inflating at their fastest level for 14 years, driven by increasing fuel and raw material costs. Manufacturers will be forced to pass on increased costs to consumers via retailers. This will further exacerbate the spiralling food and drink price inflation.”The Pensions Bill 2007 proposes an automatic enrolment in a workplace scheme or personal accounts for all workers, aged between 22 and state pension age earning more £5,035 a year (at 2006/07 rates). Workers would contribute a minimum 4% of their salaries, employers a minimum of 3% with around 1% in tax relief from the government.”Reacting to the perception that the voluntary pension system is irreparably damaged, the government is now resorting to the enforcement of compulsory employer contributions,” said Dale.last_img read more

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Sussex firm launches text ordering

first_imgA Sussex bakery has launched a new ’Text your lunch’ service. Customers text the bakery, which then calls them back and takes their lunch order by phone, so that it can be prepared for collection.The Cavendish bakery in Eastbourne already runs a successful online lunch delivery service, which it said has trebled its business over the last two months. MD Mark Bennett said the new texting service is “perfect for anyone working around the town away from an office, in vans and taxis for instance”.He added: “We bake and prepare everything daily at our bakery in town ready for our shops, wholesale orders and the Bakerylunch website, and still receive orders up to 11am on the website every morning for delivery by lunchtime the same day.”last_img read more

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Dramatic tension

first_imgMaking plaques, rolls loaves, pastries and decorating cakes – all against the clock – is challenging enough in a real working environment.However, when it comes to doing it against rival colleges, and under the scrutiny of the industry’s most esteemed judges, and, to top it all, in front of a live audience, that is real pressure!But it was also highly exciting and an excellent experience for the teams of student bakers that took part from Tameside College in Manchester, Birmingham College, Brooklands College in Surrey and a team from Norwich. The eventual winner, announced earlier this month at the Association of Bakery Students and Trainees’ conference at Blackpool was Tameside, who took back £2,000.The whole Future Baker event was supported by California Raisins and the only disappointment, according to marketing director UK and Europe Peter Meadows, was that more colleges did not take part, due, they said, to a lack of lead time.So colleges please note the next Future Baker awards will take place again at BIE on 21-24 March 2010 and ALL colleges are invited to take part. The rewards? Fun, teamwork, fantastic experience, personal feedback from the judges, a great social life, good personal discipline and the chance to really hone and improve talents.Student president Simon Solway, of Unifine Food & Bake, praised the hard work of the teams and efforts of the judges, while Dee Cassey from California Raisins said; “I am amazed at the standard of products the students have made. This is a passionate industry and, although I’m not a baker, my own passion for the trade has grown every year. We enjoy supporting students; they are the future of our industry and it is great to see the judges giving them detailed feedback after all the effort the tutors have put into training them.”She added: “On the last day, we had some fun ourselves and competed with a British Baker team. Although the official result was a dead heat, we actually feel we pipped our competitors at the post!”last_img read more

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Gloria Jean’s to develop franchise in UK market

first_imgCoffee shop chain Gloria Jean’s plans to expand the current nine-shop franchise to 150.Paul Clegg, one of the company directors who own the England, Scotland and Wales franchise for Gloria Jean’s, told British Baker: “We have further openings planned for this year in key locations such as Liverpool One and Leicester Highcross shopping Centres, but our plan is steady growth. We expect to reach 150 over the next 10 years.”Clegg continued: “Coffee is our hero, with a full range on offer, including cappuccinos, lattes and syrup-based coffees, all made by our trained baristas. Our coffees are specially blended for us and are largely from Rainforest Alliance growers.”Our baked goods offering is also very important. We are working with Rich Products, which is currently producing our signature range of Gloria Jean’s muffins. Another supplier is Handmade Cake Co. The baked goods offering is a mix of healthy with indulgence.”Our ethos is ’great coffees with heart’, as we expect our franchisees to get involved in their local community through schools, charity events and local happenings. We want customers to feel it really is the coffee shop destination for their local community.”Gloria Jean’s started out in Chicago in 1979. In 1995, the chain was bought by two Australians. By 2004, 400 stores had opened in Australia and the current figure is 470. Globally, there are 870 Gloria Jean’s outlets, with America and Turkey having the most branches outside Australia. A separate franchisee operates on the island of Ireland with nine shops.In England, Scotland and Wales, the baked goods include paninis, sandwiches and various cakes. On the drinks side, the company provides its own branded drinks, including fruit chillers and smoothies with a branded water called One Water. Many items come in from Gloria Jean’s own distribution hub in Rotterdam.Each store is bespoke and designed for the franchise partner to help develop the “community ownership” and relationship. Franchisee and other details are available on [http://www.gloriajeanscoffees.co.uk].—-=== In Short ===== Blaze at Walkers ==Walkers Bakery in Stroud, Gloucestershire, has been slightly damaged by fire, following a blaze in a back storeroom. One of the four bakers in the building used a fire extinguisher to put out the flames, which damaged a wall and a flour sack crusher.== NA golf raises £1k ==The National Association of Master Bakers held a golf day and raised £1,000 for its London and South Eastern Region. The fundraiser took place on the 8 July at Surrey National Golf Club, Surrey, with 48 golfers taking part. It was the event’s 8th successful year.== Charity café restored ==Scotswood Community Café and Bakery is to be rebuilt using the insurance pay-out it received after it was destroyed by a fire in June last year. The charity-run café in Newcastle will now have two shop units rebuilt opposite its previous location in Armstrong Road.== Courtauld success ==WRAP’s announcement that the grocery sector has met the Courtauld Commitment target to end packaging growth has been welcomed by the food industry. Melanie Leech, Food and Drink Federation director general, said: “We are now on track to cut food and packaging waste by 2010.” FDF members that have signed the Courtauld Commitment to date include: Britvic, Coca-Cola Enterprises, Greencore Group (UK), Premier Foods, United Biscuits and Warburtons.== Rugby season tackled ==Highland Spring is to sponsor rugby’s London Double Header, at Twickenham on 6 September, 2008, marking the start of the rugby season. London’s four rugby union teams – London Irish, Wasps, Saracens and Harlequins – will battle it out on the pitch.last_img read more

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Impress Sandwiches’ new range

first_imgIndependently run company, Impress Sandwiches, has launched its new range in response to an increasing demand for premium quality and added value sandwich products from catering and retail operators.The new menu consists of 70 sandwiches, wraps, ciabatta, sub rolls, savoury muffins, giant croissants and panini’s, which are available under its Impressively Premium, Deeply Impressive and Simply Impressive ranges. The products will carry the Impress brand and are available in 100% biodegradable, heat sealed cardboard wedges. Impress supply a variety of sectors, from airline and travel, to food service, vending and event caterers. It refreshes its menu four times a year as well as offering monthly specials.last_img read more

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Bakeries needed for BBC2’s Mary Queen of Shops

first_imgBBC2 series Mary Queen of Shops is on the look out for an independent high street bakery to feature in its third series.The popular television series features retail guru Mary Portas helping independent shops to make a success of their business.The third series is to focus on the high street and will feature shops such as grocers, convenience stores and bakeries.The BBC would like to hear from independent bakeries in the UK who believe they would benefit from Portas’ retail and brand knowledge. For example if they are struggling in the recession, feel they have lost touch with current trends, or are unsure about how to increase their takings.All interested bakeries should contact Tom or Nikki on 020 7967 1285 for more information, or email [email protected]last_img read more

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The chill factor

first_imgIt has been said that looks aren’t everything, and this certainly seems to be the case when it comes to chilled serve-over units. Although the aesthetics of these units is important to the overall look of the shop, versatility and function are also key selling points for bakery retailers.Bakers also look for temperature range, display features and storage facilities of the particular unit, explains Shop-Equip sales director Lee Noble.He says one of the main considerations for bakers, particularly at this time of the year, is the ambient operating temperature of the unit. “A lot of the commercial refrigeration in the UK is really only designed to operate in ambient temperatures, up to 25C, so once we get to summer, it does tend to top that ambient temperature range unfortunately,” he explains. “Unless the outlet has air conditioning or the chillers are kept away from any form of direct sunlight, it can cause problems. So it’s worthwhile for bakery retailers to double-check the ambient operating temperature of their cabinets.”Temperature, especially coming into the summer months, is also an issue Pentagram Group MD Stephen Steadman highlights. He says that although there are a great many chilled serve-overs on the market, and they may look the part, many of them are not achieving temperature within the cabinets. “It’s important to ensure that the cabinet purchased will achieve the temperature it’s meant to,” he stresses.In the current market, as bakery businesses are trying to develop and increase sales, Steadman says it’s not essential to spend a fortune on these types of units. However, there are some fundamental points that bakers need to consider. “It’s important that the products are displayed well, in a well-positioned cabinet, that is well-lit, and that really promotes the product; so as a consumer you’re seeing the product and not the chiller it’s in.” He says you can achieve so much from effective positioning of the cabinets and making sure the units have a flow to them so the customer is being drawn to the right place. For example, hot food should not be located right inside the door, but towards the back of the shop.Noble adds that a lot of manufacturers are now moving away from the typical white, grey and steel finishes, and incorporating timber effects onto the front fascias and end-panels to give more appeal to the units. Sales consultant Paul Fitch of The Jordon Group agrees that white and plain colours are now less in favour, whereas wood effect is becoming more popular, as he says it stands out more. “What’s also coming back in now is the use of square glass as apposed to curved,” adds Steadman, “and retro designs are also quite popular at the moment.” New kid on the block The Space Station is a new self-contained modular servery unit, which creates an instant trading platform. Flexible, portable and ready to use in minutes, the new innovation from catering solutions specialist Space enables businesses to sell hot and cold drinks, snacks and sandwiches, literally anywhere. The Space Station is a secure, lockable trading platform, with a variety of different display options, which comes with built-in refrigeration, lockable cupboards, cash till and open storage. MD Mike Mellor says it is the first time Space has made a ready-to-go solution. He says: “It’s available to buy or to rent, so it doesn’t tie up a huge chunk of capital outlay, and is ideal for any indoor retailing space.” The Space Station offers almost six metres of space to market and display products. It opens up to give ample working space to allow a smooth operation while trading, then closes into a compact, lockable unit to keep products secure when not in use.last_img read more

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