Month: June 2021

Rugby Championship: Round 4 is a big one

first_imgIn the other fourth round Rugby Championship match, both sets of winless warriors from Argentina and Australia will be hoping they can rub themselves with more green. The Pumas, of course, are still looking to get their first win in the competition and Ewen McKenzie must be pretty worried and a little flustered if he has dropped Will Genia. Be prepared for some panicky rugby.New Zealand: Israel Dagg, Ben Smith, Conrad Smith, Ma’a Nonu, Julian Savea, Dan Carter, Aaron Smith, Kieran Read (c), Sam Cane, Liam Messam, Sam Whitelock, Brodie Retallick, Owen Franks, Dane Coles, Tony Woodcock.Subs:Keven Mealamu, Wyatt Crockett, Charlie Faumuina, Steven Luatua, Matt Todd, Tawera Kerr Barlow, Beauden Barrett, Charles PiutauSouth Africa: Zane Kirchner, Willie le Roux, JJ Engelbrecht, Jean de Villiers (c), Bryan Habana, Morné Steyn, Ruan Pienaar, Duane Vermeulen, Willem Alberts, Francois Louw, Flip van der Merwe, Eben Etzebeth, Jannie du Plessis, Bismarck du Plessis, Tendai Mtawarira.Subs: Adriaan Strauss, Gurthrö Steenkamp, Coenie Oosthuizen, Juandré Kruger, Siya Kolisi, Jano Vermaak, Pat Lambie, Jan Serfontein.Australia: Israel Folau, James O’Connor, Adam-Ashley Cooper, Christian Lealiifano, Nick Cummins, Quade Cooper, Nic White, James Slipper, Stephen Moore, Ben Alexander, Rob Simmons, Kane Douglas, Scott Fardy, Michael Hooper, Ben Mowen (c).Subs: Saia Faingaa, Scott Sio, Sekope Kepu, Sitaleki Timani, Ben McCalman, Will Genia, Matt Toomua, Tevita Kuridrani LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS All fun and games: You would never think that New Zealand face a battle for the World Number One spotBy Alan DymockNOT SINCE Rage Against the Machine blasted past X Factor’s Joe McElderry at Christmastime 2009 has the number one spot been so coveted.On Saturday at Eden Park, New Zealand will go toe to toe with South Africa, with the winner of the contest being named world number one in the IRB World Rankings.Springbok Karate Kid: Marcell CoetzeeThe All Blacks have occupied top spot since 2009 and have been rated the best in the world for 82% of the time that the Rankings have existed (they began in October 2003).Speaking of the task ahead, South Africa captain Jean De Villiers said: “The venue where we’re playing at is not a place where a lot of people come and win. We will have to play better than we’ve ever played. We will have to make basically no mistakes and we will have to make sure the ball bounces in our direction.”There is a shared sense of wariness, with outlets in New Zealand carrying quotes from former captain Buck Shelford, who said: “The Boks have improved and are playing a more expansive game, they are strong at the back and up front and like New Zealand are good at building pressure,” before adding the caveat: “but I think we use the ball a bit better than the South Africans, while they have gone back to what they know, which is their forward pack.”Of course something has to give. New Zealand have won six in a row, while South Africa could make it a nice round 10 if they triumph. Pumas: Juan Martin Hernandez, Horacio Agulla, Gonzalo Tiesi, Felipe Contepomi, Juan Imhoff, Nicolas Sanchez, Thomas Cubelli; Marcos Ayerza, Agustín Creevy, Juan Figallo, Manuel Carizza, Julio Farias Cabello, Juan Martín Fernández Lobbe (c), Pablo Matera, Juan Manuel LeguizamónSubs: Eusebio Guiñaz, Nahuel Lobo, Juan Pablo Orlandi, Mariano Galarza, Benjamín Macome, Martín Landajo, Santiago Fernández, Lucas González Amorosino <> on September 13, 2013 in Auckland, New Zealand. last_img read more

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Have France sorted out their half-back issues?

first_img UNLUCKY 13? Philippe Saint-Andre will be hoping not.Since he became coach of France after the 2011 Rugby World Cup, Saint-Andre has gone through 12 half-back pairings in his quest for the nine and ten who can guide France to glory in next year’s World Cup. That’s 12 different combinations in 31 Test matches…no wonder France have struggled in the past three seasons, winning just 13 matches and losing 16 with two draws.Sebastien Tillous-Borde and Camille Lopez are the thirteenth pairing picked by Saint-Andre, and the signs are he’s finally found the men around which to build a team. The 29-year-old Tillous-Borde is playing the best rugby of his career at Toulon, finally fulfilling the potential he first showed when he burst onto the scene with Biarritz a decade ago.First capped on France’s summer tour to Australia in 2008, Tillous-Borde won a further eight caps in the nine months that followed. Then he was abruptly jettisoned from the French squad by Marc Lievremont, a coach whose selectorial whims make Saint-Andre look positively steady by comparison.Very un-French: Sebastien Tillous-Borde passes from No 9Tillous-Borde is a very un-French scrum-half in that he doesn’t kick goals. It’s been a quirk of French rugby that they’ve produced a generation of kicking scrum-halves: Dimitri Yachvili, Jean-Baptiste Elissalde, Morgan Parra, Maxime Machenaud and Jean-Marc Doussain, while at the same time rearing a succession of fly-halves who have never exuded much confidence when handed the kicking tee. Francois Trinh-Duc and Frederic Michalak have lacked  quality and consistency while neither Remi Tales nor Jules Plisson have been up to scratch.Consequenly the scrum-half has been the dominant player in France’s half-back partnerships of the last decade, thereby emasculating the fly-half. Fine player that Parra is, for example, one sometimes has the feeling the Clermont scrum-half believes the team revolves around him.Tillous-Borde and Lopez strike the right balance. The Toulon scrum-half is the senior in years and experience, but it’s Lopez who’s the primary decision-maker. The benefit is plain to see with the Clermont fly-half growing in confidence with each Test he plays. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Against Australia – only his third start for France, don’t forget – the 25-year-old landed six from seven shots at goal and produced a solid performance all round (save for two restarts that went straight out).He’ll work hard to correct that flaw, as he’s worked tirelessly to improve his game ever since he joined Bordeaux in 2009. When he arrived at the club he was what the Bordeaux conditioning coach, Ludovic Loustau, called ‘a rough diamond’. And a chunky one, too. At 5ft 7in and more than 15 stone, Lopez was told he needed to shed one-and-a-half stones. He did it the hard way, rising each day at dawn for a one-to-one fitness session with Loustau before the rest of the Bordeaux squad had arrived for the day’s training.Lopez’s mother admitted in a recent interview that her son had a weakness for ‘cochonneries’ (junk food), adding that since her son began taking his rugby seriously the change in his physique has been dramatic. What hasn’t changed, however, is his temperament. His technical coach at Clermont, Xavier Sadourny, told Midi Olympique recently of Lopez’s qualities: “He’s a hard-worker,” explained the former Clermont and Lyon fly-half. “Camille isn’t a guy who supports failure. To avoid it he demands extra sessions. Sometimes too many [and] I’m obliged to restrain him.”Putting the time in: Lopez does extra’s with coach Romain TeuletLopez arrived at Clermont in the summer after an ill-fated season at Perpignan. A bright start in Catalan country was curtailed last December when a serious knee injury ruled him out for the rest of season and he was a helpless spectator as his  teammates suffered a catastrophic slump in form that ended in relegation to ProD2. Putting the boot in: Camille Lopez may be the man to sort out France’s fly-half woes center_img TAGS: Highlight Moving to Clermont has been the best decision of Lopez’s young life. At Perpignan last season goal-kicking duties belonged to James Hook; at Clermont he’s been given the responsibility and he’s responded with stunning results, landing 32 of his 36 goals at kick, a success rate of 88.9%.Responsibility. It’s what every fly-half requires, and if Saint-Andre continues to give it to Lopez he’ll finally have found the fly-half France have been craving for years.last_img read more

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Challenge Cup: What you may be missing

first_img TAGS: Exeter Chiefs Welcome domestic break for key clashYou don’t have to go far back into the annals of European competition to find Cardiff Blues and London Irish mixing it with some big names at the business end of the tournament.The Exiles were edged out in a 2008 semi-final against Toulouse, while the Blues fell to a heartbreaking penalty shoot-out defeat to Leicester Tigers at the same stage a year later. The European stocks of both have failed to reach such heady heights since.The two clubs have endured uninspiring campaigns in 2014, and are at risk of spending the coming months with neck ache as they stare up the table as the high-flying teams pull further away.For a fortnight, however, these domestic woes can be set aside, as they collide for sole control of Pool 1. Irish’s 70-19 mauling of Rovigo in the first round showed their calibre in this tournament, and it remains the biggest scoreline in either European competition to this stage. But Cardiff Blues have shown unrelenting promise of their own, recording bonus point wins in their opening two matches to sit level with this weekend’s opponents.There can be criticism of the Challenge Cup throwing up dud matches and dead rubbers. This one is anything but – the next two weeks will prove pivotal to quarter-final qualification.Break from the blues: Both Cardiff Blues and London Irish have endured difficult domestic seasons so farChiefs proving Premiership form is no flukePerhaps the biggest Aviva Premiership story this season has been the seemingly irrepressible rise of Exeter Chiefs. An immaculate kicking display from Gareth Steenson did for Saracens last weekend, cementing the Chiefs’ position just three points shy of table-toppers Northampton Saints after nine games.And while cynics believe the momentum is due a stutter – a run of three away games in four Premiership matches will prove a tough run – their form in the Challenge Cup serves as a reminder that the eyebrow-raising performance so far this season is no flash in the pan.Their win in La Rochelle was their first success in six attempts on French soil, and gives them a great chance of qualification into the latter stages. Not only was Steenson, new contract in tow, again influential with the boot, but the composure shown in acquiring a late try bonus point will prove priceless if they are to continue pulling up trees domestically and in Europe.Kicking on: Flying high in the Premiership, Exeter show no sign of wavering in the Challenge CupEntertainment still on offerSuch is the streamlined new format of both European competitions that Champions Cup upsets on the level of Connacht‘s heroic toppling of Toulouse in 2013 are not so readily available. Instead, arguably the biggest shock in this season’s European rugby came in the second round of Challenge Cup action, when Newport Gwent Dragons ran out bonus point winners over Stade Francais in Paris.The scale of the Dragons’ achievement is impressive enough when you acknowledge the historically robust challenge that winning on French soil poses. But bearing in mind that Stade are yet to be beaten at home in the Top 14, and currently sit just two points off the peerless Toulon at the top of the ladder, the victory borders on the truly momentous. Trophy talk: What are the big talking points around this year’s European Challenge Cup? Perhaps what is more stunning still is that that same Newport side, albeit with a largely changed front five, were subsequently beaten by Newcastle Falcons at Rodney Parade the following weekend, despite crossing the whitewash three times in the opening half.It was a pair of results that perfectly advertised the quality this tournament has to offer. The Falcons top the pool heading into a double header with the Parisiennes and there is a genuine chance that all three sides will be in touch come Rounds 5 and 6. It is the type of entertainment that the Challenge Cup will thrive on.After shock: The Dragons caused an upset in France, but fell to Newcastle in their next matchRight team, right timeIn this month’s Rugby World,  the 1872 Cup clash between Edinburgh and Glasgow was picked out as a “must not miss” clash for the Christmas period. But ahead of the traditional Scottish tussle, the Warriors are in the thick of a battle for domestic supremacy, while their nearby neighbours are facing a scrap of their own to avoid slipping into a Guinness Pro12 mini-league of five clubs at the bottom of the table.To add to the ever-widening gap between the Celtic rivals, Glasgow’s warm up begins this weekend with the first leg of a double header against European heavyweights Toulouse. Edinburgh, on the other hand, welcome English whipping boys London Welsh to the BT Murrayfield Stadium.The contrast could not be more stark, but Alan Solomons‘ side may find some respite in the back-to-back Challenge Cup matches ahead of them.The newly-promoted Exiles have conceded 50 or more points on five occasions this season, and their porous defence will certainly need to shore up if they are to stoke the attacking intent that Tom Heathcote, Andries Strauss and Matt Scott will be looking to bring.It may seem unfair to suggest that Welsh provide a blank canvas on which Edinburgh can unleash their creativity, but after an unbeaten start in the competition they will anticipate this as a chance to secure a quarter-final berth and garner some much needed confidence a few weeks ahead of the 1872 Cup grudge match.Clean through: Charlie Sharples has starred in Gloucester’s strong European startMomentum moment for Gloucester After a 21-9 success at London Irish last weekend, Gloucester director of rugby David Humphreys spoke of the “momentum” the result would offer his side going forward.Consistency has been the Cherry and Whites’ Achilles heel for some time, and it has been especially prevalent this campaign – they have only managed to secure consecutive wins on one occasion outside of the Challenge Cup. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Humphreys’ comments suggest that the upcoming back-to-back clashes with Zebre, starting at Kingsholm on Sunday, could provide a long overdue shot in the arm for their domestic intentions.They may also be eyeing a shot at the Challenge Cup trophy, with the quality of their squad seeming to outweigh that of the counterparts they may face down the line. Humphreys’ policy in sticking with a strong first choice side in Europe shows the inherent desire to gel a largely new look team, but also hints at a real intention in this tournament. The Challenge Cup returns to the rugby menu this weekend alongside its big sister competition. Here are a few things that you may have missed… last_img read more

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What it’s like to train with England Sevens

first_img Collapse Insight: England Sevens captain Tom Mitchell demonstrates a weights move (John Marsh) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Expand England captain Tom Mitchell: “The enjoyment of sevens drives itself” What it’s like to train with England SevensThink you’ve got what it takes to make it in international sevens? Nope, neither did we. But the chance to train alongside HSBC World Sevens Series all-time record try scorer Dan Norton, England captain Tom Mitchell and rising star Ethan Waddleton – as well as a bunch of apprehensive journalists – at Twickenham was too good an opportunity to turn down. Besides, at just seven minutes a half, how fit do you need to be?Play to the beepThe answer – I discover as we step out onto the Twickenham turf – wouldn’t take long to find out. First up is the infamous ‘yo-yo test’. “Remember the bleep test?” asks 28-year-old Mitchell, with a mischievous smile breaking across his face. “Well, this is our version.”Running along the touchline are a series of cones set up 20 metres apart. The goal is to jog out to the cone and back, rest for ten seconds, then go again, all timed to beeps that get progressively closer together. The problem is that this jog quickly turns into a dash, then a sprint, then a form of relentless respiratory torture.Running man: Sam Rider (centre) takes part in the yo-yo test at Twickenham (John Marsh)“We perform the yo-yo test two to three times a season to test our fitness,” explains Norton, now 30, a yo-yo veteran with 372 World Series matches, 287 tries, a Commonwealth Games bronze and Olympic silver medal under his belt. England’s players are expected to hit level 19 as a bare minimum. I tap out at level 17 – my chest swelling with pride at my achievement, or is that heart failure?!“You did pretty well,” acknowledges Norton. “Elite, we say, is level 19. We want everyone above 19. That’s a good gauge of fitness. From there we’ve got players getting to level 20 and 21 but it starts to become a slippery slope after 19 – you’re just holding on for dear life.”Short circuitHaving emptied the tank on the yo-yo test in a vain attempt to impress the England selectors – I’m sure they’re watching – my heart sinks when I realise it’s only one fitness test down, two to go before the reward of lunch.With my legs rapidly turning to jelly I follow the players and similarly jaded journalists back inside Twickenham, past walls emblazoned with red painted words of inspiration – SPORTSMANSHIP, RESPECT, TEAMWORK, DISCIPLINE, ENJOYMENT – to England’s state-of-the-art gym.Push to the limit: Sam Rider gets stuck into the fitness circuit (John Marsh)Imbued with renewed resolve I take a deep breath in preparation of what’s coming. On one side squat racks, Olympic lifting platforms, anti-gravity treadmills, pneumatic training machinery and futuristic rehabilitation apparatus line the gym. On the other, artificial green turf runs the length of the room, scattered with dumb-bells, medicine balls, battle ropes and weighted sleds. In other words, we’ve stepped between a rock and a hard place.Battle readyEthan Waddleton shows us the ropes, demonstrating the power endurance circuit we’re about to tackle. At 21, he’s one of the new kids on the block in this England team in transition, having been spotted on a talent ID weekend not dissimilar to the one we’re being subjected to. On these open days, aspiring sevens players are put through a series of fitness tests to see if they’ve got the physical potential to make the grade.“Endurance is one of the main things coaches are looking for,” says Waddleton, a relative newbie in the squad, despite already amassing 78 appearances on the World Series.“The game involves so much running and it’s such a high demand on your body,” he says. “You obviously need to have good skills to play because in 15s you’re only passing the ball three metres but in sevens you’ve got to throw a massive ten-metre pass while running flat out. You’ve got to be able to play when you’re hanging, when you’re gassed and your lungs are burning.”MORE ON ENGLAND SEVENS CAPTAIN TOM MITCHELL: Having thoroughly earned our post-workout recovery meal, the players agree to cut our final fitness test short. All we have to do is a one minute “blast” on the Wattbike – a sophisticated exercise bike that measures power output as well as distance and speed.“When you’re recovering from an injury the Wattbike becomes your friend,” says Mitchell, clearly revelling in the drill instructor role. “It’s a pretty crap friend because sessions on the bike can be brutal – but it’s worthwhile to get back to the level you need for international sevens and, like a lot of our training, this is a mental battle too. When you think you’ve had enough, try to push through.”Mentally, I’m fried within 20 seconds and the blood in my thighs feels like it’s turning to concrete. I grind out a few more revolutions before slumping over the handlebars and acknowledge the peak power I’ve mustered of 785W wouldn’t come close to the numbers Mitchell & Co would post.Pedal power: Dan Norton gives advice during the Wattbike session (John Marsh)One might ask what a static bike has to do with preparing you for the demands of international sevens, but the Wattbike is a prime example of how the sport has embraced cutting edge thinking in sports science.“Sevens has always been experimental and pioneering,” explains Mitchell, pointing to the use of GPS for monitoring performance, concentrated beetroot shots for recovery and foil-lined suits to maintain optimum temperature before kick-off.“Everyone uses GPS now but sevens is where it was first tested. Now every morning we have our heart-rate variability monitored, which helps predict if we’re getting ill or susceptible to injury.”Attitudes towards mental health and the psychological demands of the game are also starting to change, acknowledges Norton.“One of the biggest things I’ve learnt over my career is how important it is to mentally recover between matches. I’ve learnt how to use music to mentally switch on and off. It’s vital to conserve energy. You can’t stay hyped from 10am until 6pm across a tournament – you’ll just burn out.”Witness the fitnessThirty minutes, one hot shower and two-and-a-half jerk chicken wraps later I’m beginning to feel slightly more human, as I reflect on the day’s eye-opening experience.Today was simply a snapshot of the power endurance and stamina required for the game, forgetting that players have to dodge or derail opponents charging at them like runaway trains throughout a tournament weekend.Centred: The journalists work on their core (John Marsh)The physical demands are frightening. According to one study on the game published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, players typically record above 80% of their maximal heart rate for threequarters of a match and above 90% for almost 40% of a game.Across a World Series weekend players can expect to repeat that six times. Norton’s 33-year-old team-mate James Rodwell holds the record for consecutive tournaments with a mind-boggling 69 in a row. “I’m lucky, I’m quite robust too,” says Norton. “But mainly because I like to stay away from contact.”Are you not entertained? Sevens players battle extreme physical fatigue, not to mention withstanding multiple impacts, mental pressure and, given the sport is renowned for chasing the sun around the globe, blistering heat.Just spare a thought for the men and women providing the entertainment on the pitch next time you’re revelling in the stands, refreshing beverage in hand.Fast show: Dan Norton breaks to score in Singapore (Getty Images)“Today was just a taste of the kind of training we would normally do in a week,” Norton later explains. “It was seven hours condensed down into an hour and a half. But it was a good shot in the arm for what it’s like to be a sevens player.”Seven hours? A day? And I’m spent after just 90 minutes. With that, I realise, I might be the same age as Dan Norton, but I’m definitely getting too old for this. A week in the life of England Sevens captain Tom Mitchell England Sevens captain Tom Mitchell tells Sam Rider… BEING BACK is more than just a relief… England captain Tom Mitchell: “The enjoyment of sevens drives itself” How tough is elite international rugby sevens? Sam Rider found out the hard way as England Sevens stars put him to the test at Twickenham A week in the life of England Sevens captain Tom Mitchell Just five minutes into the circuits and I’m starting to know the feeling. The thought of throwing anything ten metres, bar my breakfast, is a pipe dream. Spotting the opportunity for a strategic timeout I ask Waddleton for tips for aspiring sevens players – even those, like me, on the wrong side of 30.“My best advice is to play as many sevens tournaments as you can,” he says, having risen through the ranks at Ipswich and Colchester, then the academies of Northampton Saints and Saracens before signing for England Sevens in 2015.“Sevens is such a different game to 15s and you only get better by playing it. Plus you’ll meet amazing people. It’s like rugby networking. That’s what I did at the backend of school. I played at Maidenhead, the Floodlit Sevens at Rosslyn Park and loads more before I got my break.”Power hungry This year’s HSBC London Sevens takes place at Twickenham from 2-3 June. To be part of it, ticket information can be found here. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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Principality Stadium roof will be open for Wales v Ireland

first_img— Ben Coles (@bencoles_) March 15, 2019 Heavy #Rain on #Saturday could lead to some localised #Flooding in places. Stay #WeatherAware pic.twitter.com/RXU2TFiQS0— Met Office (@metoffice) March 14, 2019As Storm Gareth takes its toll, Wales is expected to see plenty of the rain with up to 100mm in some places, according to the Met Office. Roof open for Wales vs Ireland at the Principality Stadum. Storm Gareth up to its usual mischief, brutal weather in Cardiff – buckle up folks.— Tom Hamilton (@tomhamiltonespn) March 15, 2019According to weather forecasts, there is 100% chance of rain in Cardiff, and things could be a little worse than previous days. Roof is definitely going to be open, per Ireland’s request made *yesterday*. Wales currently going through captain’s run with it shut. Strong winds are also expected to hit.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. The stadium in Cardiff will be open to the elements as Wales chase a Grand Slamcenter_img Principality Stadium roof will be open for Wales v IrelandIn a small victory before the main event, Ireland have been successful in their bid to have the roof of the Principality Stadium open to the elements on Saturday. Heavy rain is forecast for the afternoon, as Wales chase their first Grand Slam in the Six Nations since 2012.The decision comes after Ireland coach Joe Schmidt had publicly suggested Wales had broken protocol by asking Six Nations bosses to allow the roof to be closed for the match that could decide who wins the Championship.Related: Six Nations title race explainedUnder Six Nations rules, both teams must agree to the roof being closed.Yesterday, Schmidt said: “There’s been a request from Wales that in the interest of the quality of the game and the very poor weather forecast that the roof be closed. So they’ve said to the Six Nations directly, ‘can it be closed?’”Wanting it open: Ireland head coach Joe Schmidt (Getty Images)On the eve of the contest though, Six Nations officials upheld a demand from Ireland, filed yesterday, for the roof to be open.There was more from Schmidt yesterday, as he also discussed other tactics used within the stadium when the roof is closed.“I think the last time it was closed, we arrived there and there was a lot said about making it good for spectators and the sprinklers were on for 30 minutes and the ground was very damp before the game started,” he said.“That probably enters into our mind – which ‘closed’ is it going to be? Closed and wet or closed and dry? If it is closed and wet, you might as well have the window open and let the rain come in.” The WRU built rugby’s greatest stadium 20 years ago. They had foresight to install retractable roof. It is unfathomable that visiting team decides if roof is to be shut.— Stephen Jones (@stephenjones9) March 14, 2019 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Skies above: a general view of the Principality Stadium roof (Getty Images) last_img read more

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Long-term injury: David Denton deals with life after rugby

first_img Long-term injury: David Denton deals with life after rugbyDavid Denton retired from rugby in September after almost 14 months on the sidelines dealing with debilitating concussion. Today he is positive about the future and appreciative of the support he received at Leicester Tigers. But after calling time on his career then, the recovery goes on.“Other than golf, I’ve probably done three days’ exercise in nine months,” the 42-cap Scotland back-row reveals at the end of November. “It’s really, really tough. And that’s all in the last few weeks. I’m slowly trying to get back into exercise now because the last bit of getting rid of the last symptoms is going to come from doing exercise.“But I need to get the balance right. Because if I go too hard I’m going to be straight back to square one and then I’m gonna have to wait another month or two before I can start easing back into it again.”It’s not quite as bad as fearing a short run for the bus or picking up his baby, but there are shadows from his past life that can make you flinch.Abrasive: Taking the ball up against Sale Sharks (Getty Images)He explains: “I haven’t watched a huge amount of rugby in the last however long but when I’ve been watching rugby matches I’m like, ‘oh my God’. I can’t fathom running into a group of bodies and, yeah, having a massive collision. I just can’t fathom that.“A short burst of exercise isn’t gonna floor me but it’s like I said, if I try to go too fast… I’m slowly doing what I’m doing. I’m actually swimming. So if I jumped into a pool and tried to swim a (kilometre) straight off the bat, I’d be pretty f***** up for a couple of days, I’d say.”Clearly the Zimbabwe-born bruiser would love to have hung up the boots at a time of his choosing. At 29 then, he should have been bashing tacklers in that all-too-familiar Denton style. Having joined Leicester following stints with Worcester and Bath after a move south from Edinburgh, he put together six games for them and wanted to give fans something to appreciate.Life does not always work like that. He tells Rugby World that for the year leading up to the big decision, he had gone to bed every night with a headache. As the days went on he would get worse and it exacted a psychological toll – “The idea of getting back on the field was weighing me down,” he says.Flying high: Winning a lineout for Scotland, 2018 (Getty Images)In the current issue of Rugby World magazine, Henry Trinder talks us through his comeback from a ruptured Achilles. In the piece, the Gloucester centre talks of hunting down small goals. Reflecting on this, Denton reveals that one of the most frustrating elements of his time out with concussion was that for eight months he saw no change in his condition. From the day it happened, he says, until just over a month before today, there was very little change.Related: Rugby World magazine’s all-stars editionAfter a scattering of tests and consultations over the near-14 months with six or seven specialists, by the time he went to the same London specialist’s office he’d visited over and over for the last year to get the final news – the Leicester physios even asked the night before if the back-rower wanted family with him – there was a scintilla of relief. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “It wasn’t a big emotive moment for me, mate,” Denton adds. “It was just a point of putting a full-stop on it. Because I already knew what was going to be said. I remember feeling a bit funny about (the meeting) the night before. I knew this thing that had been lingering over me was finally about to happen, but when it did it wasn’t a big draining moment.”Since his retirement, Tigers have continued to help him out. Their extended network of influential figures has come to the fore. Not to give him a job but to chat through his options, how they can help, offering advice.During his time out, Denton deferred an MBA at Warwick’s business school twice, before eventually abandoning it. He has moved back to Edinburgh with his young family, but he believes his skill-set can help him fit into the business world and it is likely his search for a new vocation will lead him to London.After his convalescence and time spent with family back in Africa, he is looking ahead with a sense of renewed vigour. The new diet might help too.“I was a professional athlete for ten years and my diet’s never been as healthy as it is now because back then I just got away with it,” he laughs. “My genetic make-up just meant that whatever I ate was converted straight into energy. It was fantastic and I pretty much ate what I wanted, whereas now I can’t.Capital gains: Carrying for Edinburgh in 2015 (Getty Images)“This is not a problem I’ve ever had before but for some reason sugar sends me (into a bad state). So my diet’s improved massively. That includes things like white carbs because they spike my glucose levels. So I have to keep an eye on that now.“It’s not about aesthetics. That’s not why I’m dieting. I’m dieting because I want to feel normal.”For those who saw him dig in on the field, it will come as no surprise that he wants to get going on a new route as soon as he is ready for it. “I genuinely feel really positive about that,” he says, before adding: “I’ve also been incredibly humbled by how great the rugby network has been for me since I’ve retired.”Dealing with long-term injury can be a frustrating and lonely place. Transitioning out of the game is also something many want to understand more. For Denton, he is keen to impress on people how he can contribute to any new workplace straightaway. That’s the next big step in recovery. The former Scotland back-rower retired from the game in September following a lengthy lay-off with concussioncenter_img Looking ahead: David Denton in his last playing season, with Leicester Tigers (Getty Images) To read our long-read on long-term injury, check out the new issue of Rugby World.Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.last_img read more

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Black Friday Rugby Deals 2020 – New offers added

first_imgThe best oval-ball bargains on offer this week Buy Now from Amazon for £25.99Asics South Africa 20/21 Travel HoodieThe Springboks may not be playing any Tests this year but they’re still world champions and this hoodie (RRP £58) is an understated way to show support.Buy Now from ProDirectRugby for £46Adidas Predator XP Soft Ground BootsNeed a new pair of rugby boots? Usually £169.95, you can save more than £50 on this Adidas pair over Black Friday.Buy Now from Adidas for £118.97Save 25% at Raging BullPhil Vickery’s brand Raging Bull is known for its heritage and quality – and there is 25% off everything during its Black Friday Event.Check out Raging BullMacron Scotland 20/21 Home Replica ShirtSave £10 on the latest Scotland strip (RRP £70), complete with collar and gold trim.Buy Now from ProDirectRugby for £60Canterbury Phoenix 3.0 Soft Ground Rugby BootSave up to £20 on this pair (RRP £64.95), which are ideal as the weather turns wetter.Buy Now from Amazon from £43.99 £20 voucher for every £100 you spend at Lovell RugbyLovell Sports are offering shoppers a £20 voucher for every £100 spent between 24 and 30 November. They also have savings on the British & Irish Lions range right now.Check out Lovell RugbyAdidas New Zealand 19/20 Home Replica ShirtSave £20 on the current All Blacks jersey (RRP £65).Buy Now from ProDirectRugby for £45Canterbury Men’s Uglies Open Hem Stadium PantsStay warm and comfortable whether training outdoors or relaxing at home with these tracksuit bottoms (RRP £45) – and save more than £16 with this offer.Buy Now from Amazon from £28.99Half-price Rugby World magazine subscription!Yes, Rugby World has a great Black Friday offer for you too. Save 50% on a magazine subscription until 10am (GMT) on Tuesday 1 December.Buy Now from Magazines Direct from £16.49All Blacks Supporters Bomber JacketLightweight but insulating – and you can save 30% on this Adidas coat (RRP £64.95) right now.Buy Now from Adidas for £45.47Macron Italy 19/20 LS Cotton ShirtThis stylish long-sleeved shirt (RRP £50) featuring the Italian flag colours is currently half price!Buy Now from ProDirectRugby for £25Canterbury Stampede 3.0 Pro Soft Ground Rugby BootSave up to £29 on this pair (RRP £79.95), which are rated amongst our best rugby boots for forwards in 2020.Buy Now from Amazon from £50.99Save 15% at England Rugby StoreEngland Rugby Store is offering 15% off products sitewide for the whole of Black Friday Week, so whether you want a replica jersey or a rose-branded pint glass, there are savings galore.Check out England Rugby StoreCanterbury Women’s Vapodri Evader Hooped Rugby JerseyWith Vapodri technology to keep you cool and a flattering cut on the sleeves, this shirt (RRP £37) is a great look on or off the field. And you can save more than a tenner right now.Buy Now from Amazon from £24.99 4Athlts ID Duffel Bag MediumNeed a new kit bag? This Adidas bag (RRP £42.95) comes in three colours – black, blue and grey – and can switch from a duffell to a rucksack. Plus, there’s up to 25% off!Buy Now from Adidas from £32.22Amazon has a plethora of Black Friday deals – we’ve highlighted the best ones above or head to the Amazon rugby section for more. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. (Getty Images) center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Black Friday Rugby Deals 2020Whether treating yourself or doing your Christmas shopping, Black Friday is a great time to bag a bargain!Black Friday itself is 27 November but there are already brilliant offers available and below we have all the information you need to take advantage.If you’re looking for a new pair of rugby boots or a replica shirt, check out our buyers’ guides for the best rugby kit. And we have a round-up of the best rugby books of 2020 too.Black Friday Rugby Deals 202040% off the British & Irish Lions Hackett CollectionThere are big Black Friday savings on the Lions’ Hackett range, like this sweatshirt reduced from £135 to £81.Check out the Hackett rangeVX-3 Ireland 2019-20 Kids Vintage Rugby ShirtThis classic-look shirt (RRP £40) is better than half price right now – there are ones available for other countries too.Buy Now from Lovell Rugby for £12Karrimor Alpinister Down Men’s JacketLooking to stay warm this winter? You can save more than 65% on this lightweight down jacket (RRP £159.99), which is available in black and blue.Buy Now from Sports Direct for £50Kooga Senior Rugby Tackle BagThere are a host of offers on tackle bags and contact shields on Lovell Rugby, including £25 off this Kooga one (RRP £150).Buy Now from Lovell Rugby for £125Mizuno Rebula 3 RG Pro SI SGSave 50% on these black-and-silver boots (RRP £130). You can also have these personalised.Buy Now from ProDirectRugby for £65Polo Ralph Luaren Polo 4092 SunglassesPining for warmer weather? When the sun does come out these shades (RRP £135) will come in handy – and there is more than 50% off right now.Buy Now from Lovell Rugby for £60Le Coq Sportif France 19/20 HoodieAn alternative to the replica shirt to show your support for France – and there’s nearly a third off this hoodie (RRP £65).Buy Now from ProDirectRugby for £46England Rugby Home Replica Pro Jersey TopUmbro are offering 20% off their England range right now, including a saving of £20 on the replica pro jersey (RRP £100).Buy Now from Umbro for £80 Canterbury Adult Reinforcer Rugby HeadguardSave 48% on this scrum cap, which conforms to World Rugby’s specs (usual price £50). Great if you’re getting ready to return to training once restrictions allow.last_img read more

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Watch: Kyle Sinckler emotional interview on Lions omission

first_imgSinckler, who has won 44 England caps, was part of the 2017 Lions squad that toured New Zealand, coming off the bench in all three Tests against the All Blacks, and was a surprise omission from Gatland’s 2021 party.Related: The making of Kyle SincklerThe Lions have picked three tightheads for the tour to South Africa – Ireland’s Tadhg Furlong, who was first-choice No 3 in 2017, and Andrew Poter, who can also play loosehead, as well as Scotland prop Zander Fagerson.Kyle Sinckler breaks for the Lions in 2017 (Sportsfile/Getty Images)Of the decision, Gatland said: “Kyle was very unlucky. It was a tough call, but we’re happy with the balance we’ve got at the moment.” He responded to his omission by putting in a Man of the Match performance in Bristol’s win over Bath, a result which ensured the Bears will be involved in this season’s Gallagher Premiership play-offs.Sinckler then gave an emotional interview to BT Sport discussing missing out on a place in the squad, describing how tough the week has been because the Lions “means so much to me”.Open and honest, he has vowed to learn from the disappointment and explained that, as a role model, he wanted to use the anger he felt in a positive way.You can watch the full interview here… Watch: Kyle Sinckler emotional interview on Lions omissionKyle Sinckler has given an emotional interview on his British & Irish Lions omission.The Bristol Bears and England prop was expected to be included in Warren Gatland’s squad to tour South Africa this summer but was not among the 37 names read out by Jason Leonard earlier this week.Sinckler put out a post on social media following the Lions squad announcement to say how “gutted” he was not to be involved and showing his support for those selected. The Bristol Bears prop opens up after missing out on selection for the tour to South Africacenter_img Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Bristol prop Kyle Sinckler missed out on Lions 2021 selection (CameraSport/Getty Images) last_img read more

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Who is Iain Henderson: Ten things you should know about the Ireland lock

first_imgFrom llamas to Springsteen, find out more about the lock/six hybrid Collapse Who is Iain Henderson: Ten things you should know about the Ireland lockIain Henderson was due to study maths in Edinburgh when he was offered a place in Ulster’s academy. He switched to Queen’s University in Belfast and the rugby honours that have followed since would suggest he made the right decision.The Ireland lock was selected for the 2017 British & Irish Lions tour to New Zealand and the Lions 2021 tour to South Africa.Ten things you should know about Iain Henderson1. Iain Henderson was born in Craigavon, County Armagh, near Lough Neagh, on 21 February 2021.2. He attended Belfast Royal Academy, where legendary Ireland fly-half Jack Kyle was also an alumni. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Lions squad analysis: Five talking points Expand 5. He made his Test debut only seven months later in November against South Africa. Ireland lost 16-12 following a try from Springbok scrum-half Ruan Pienaar. Lions squad analysis: Five talking points Monster’s Ball: A Detailed Look At Iain Henderson Expand 6. Henderson told The Times he was still living in student housing a year before his Ireland debut and recalled messing around with snakes and chickens in the home.7. After Rory Best’s retirement, Henderson was named captain of Ulster for the 2019-20 season.8. His musical hero is Bruce Springsteen, with the 1975 hit Born to Run his favourite track. Social media reacts to the Iain Henderson try… Social media reacts to the Iain Henderson try that wasn’t Ireland lock Iain Henderson is Ulster’s captain (Getty Images) 3. One of his nicknames is ‘Llama’ because of a lock of hair which sometimes blocks his eyesight. His father used to call him Herr Flick, after the ‘Allo ‘Allo! character.4. Having represented Ireland at U19 and U20 level, he made his debut for Ulster in April 2012 against provincial rivals Connacht. They lost 26-21, a first defeat by the Galway-based province since 2005. Social media reacts to the Iain Henderson try that wasn’t Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. THE SIGHT of Iain Henderson hitting opponents like… Jacob Whitehead picks out the learnings from Warren… 9. He won a reputation for having ‘hollow legs’ on the 2017 Lions tour – with him and Rory Best leading the Lions’ drinking efforts in the bar.10. Henderson captained Ireland for the first time on Valentine’s Day 2021, leading the side in their second match of the Six Nations against France. Monster’s Ball: A Detailed Look At Iain Hendersonlast_img read more

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Executive Council pledges to reconsider budget process for 2015

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Church’s Executive Council members Fredrica Thompsett, left, Katie Sherrod and Tess Judge helped council members revise their norms for the triennium during council’s Oct. 15-18 meeting in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service – New Brunswick, New Jersey] This may be the first meeting of the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council since General Convention in July but, the members looked ahead to the 2015 convention and the 2016-2018 budget.Diocese of Ohio Bishop Mark Hollingsworth, chair of council’s Joint Standing Committee on Finances for Mission told the council that FFM “discussed at length the budget-building process.”During those discussions, the committee agreed that the process needs to be changed, even though a special task force on the structure of the church, that will begin meeting in 2013, will no doubt discuss budgeting issues. That task force is due to be named in early December. The task force will bring its recommendations to the 2015 meeting of General Convention in Salt Lake City, Utah, and the 2016-2018 budget process must begin during this triennium.The FFM budget-process subcommittee, Hollingsworth told the council, will include FFM members Susan Snook as chair, Tess Judge, Francisco Quinones, and the Rev. Canon John Floberg. They will also ask the chairs and vice chairs of council’s Joint Standing Committee on Governance and Mission and the convention’s Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance to join the subcommittee, Hollingsworth said.He added that FFM would like Bishop Stacy Sauls, the church’s chief operating officer, and Treasurer Kurt Barnes to be on the subcommittee, and he asked Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Jennings to appoint representatives from the Standing Commissions on Structure and Constitution and Canons.Finally, the subcommittee will include, in Hollingsworth’s words, “outside resource people who can lend a fresh eye to this.”The subcommittee is expected to report to council’s Feb. 25-27 meeting in Linthicum Heights, Maryland, outside of Baltimore.Saying “we’re well begun,” Jefferts Schori said during a press conference before the end of the meeting that she was “grateful that this council is forming itself around engagement with God’s mission. That really is the framework for all of the work we’re doing.”Jennings agreed and added that council’s visit to the Episcopal Church Center on Oct. 16 “set the groundwork for members of council and members of the DMFS staff to have productive and fruitful working relationships through this triennium”Other budget-related actionCouncil approved a slightly revised version of the 2013 budget for the Episcopal Church. Each meeting of General Convention passes a triennial budget but, council considers and approves the annual versions of that budget. The 2013 will be posted here soon. The 2013-2015 budget is here.The Episcopal Church’s triennial contribution to the work of the Anglican Communion Office got a boost of $104,000 when council corrected when Sauls told them he’d made a mistake during the 2013-2015 budgeting process that led to a reduction in the amount. “It was simply a mistake and I apologize for that,” he said.The presiding bishop told the council that when she was asked about what size of a communion contribution could be “tolerated” and said she replied that “to decrease it significantly is going to send a difficult message, and that I would hope that we would at least keep it even with what we had offered in this last triennium.”The Episcopal Church contributed $1.1 million during the 2010-2012 triennium. Council members agreed they would revisit the church’s contributions in 2014 and 2015.Jefferts Schori, Jennings, Diocese of Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas and Josephine Hicks of North Carolina are due to participate in the Oct. 27-Nov. 7 meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council in Auckland, New Zealand. The communion office’s budget will be approved during that meeting. Jennings said she was sure the Episcopal Church’s ACC members would be asked about the reduction.Jane Cosby, council member from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, urged the council to correct the mistake during this meeting because “it doesn’t feel good now in this room to hear that, and it’s not a good image out there, and it’s not a good base for them to make this trip.”In other action, council:* Discussed in a very brief executive session the Oct 17 announcement that Episcopal Church’s Disciplinary Board for Bishops had certified to Jefferts Schori that South Carolina Bishop Mark Lawrence had abandoned the Episcopal Church “by an open renunciation of the discipline of the church.” Later that same day, the diocese announced that it had disaffiliated from the Episcopal Church after the board’s action. See ENS stories here and here.* Authorized a $785,000 line of credit to the Diocese of San Joaquin for 2013 to support the continuing diocese. Council has consistently supported the work of reorganizing the diocese since its former bishop and leadership tried in December 2007 to leave the Episcopal Church. Governance and Administration Chair Steve Hutchinson told council “there’s a special and very deep opportunity for mission and ministry and rebuilding of the church there.” He added that what he called “this partnership of trust and support” of the diocese “has been very critical to not just the folks in San Joaquin – that diocese and its future – but the legal process there continues to inform our strategic and legal positions in other litigation and hopefully shows a pattern of how, through that collegial and supportive relationship, the folks in other dioceses who are, have or will face those challenges can feel a sense of community with the whole church.”* Recommended that council meetings during 2013-2015 be scheduled primarily at the Conference Center at the Maritime Institute in Linthicum, Maryland, a frequent council meeting site in the past two triennia. The council also recommended that the October 2014 council meeting be four days long and that the remainder of its meetings during the 2013-2015 triennium run three days, with the potential of an early 2015 meeting being extended to four days. The decisions, Hutchinson said, will allow council to continue to meet face-to-face three times each year, as opposed to a suggestion in the 2013-20-15 budget that council have one “virtual” meeting each year. Jefferts Schori said that the council does not yet have the technology to conduct such a large meeting with online methods.* Re-elected member Martha Gardner to be the council’s liaison with the governing body of the Anglican Church of Canada.* Elected the Rev. Brian Cole, Martha Gardner, Steve Hutchinson, John Johnson, the Rev. Canon Charles LaFond and Debbie Stokes the council’s executive committee* Elected Stephanie Cheney to be the council’s liaison with the governing body of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and Liza Anderson was elected deputy.The Oct. 15-18 meeting was at the Heldrich hotel and conference center in the Diocese of New Jersey. ENS coverage of the first day of the meeting is here. The second day’s coverage is here. Council spent the third day of the meeting on Oct. 17 in orientation sessions and in committee time.The Executive Council carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1)(a). The council is composed of 38 members, 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by the nine provincial synods for six-year terms, plus the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies. About half of the members are new to the council with this meeting, having just been elected by General Convention and the provinces.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Executive Council, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Program Budget & Finance Featured Events Comments (1) Executive Council October 2012, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 18, 2012 October 20, 2012 at 4:36 am The modest increase in funding for the Anglican Communion Office, whether it came about as a “mistake” or whether it was cut at General Convention (as this earlier article from ENS makes clear: https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2012/08/09/awareness-of-anglican-communion-radically-changed-in-a-decade/) is welcome news, especially for the way it indicates—one hopes—support for the Anglican Communion Office among members of the Executive Council.It’s worth noting, however (as ENS has in the past), that the level of funding in the 2009-2012 triennium was still less than half what the ACO assessed the Episcopal Church. So “restoring” funding in this case still means under-funding an important organization.Also, the Episcopal Church should be represented at the Anglican Consultative Council by one bishop, one priest, and one layperson. This article lists two bishops and one lay person. In the past, Gay Jennings has been the priest representative. Will she be again for this ACC meeting?-Jesse Zink Jesse Zink says: Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments are closed. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Executive Council pledges to reconsider budget process for 2015 Members adjust communion contribution, offer more support to San Joaquin Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Shreveport, LA last_img read more

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