Tag: 上海龙凤419

Murder of radio journalist who investigated corruption

first_img July 6, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Murder of radio journalist who investigated corruption Help by sharing this information BrazilAmericas Reporters Without Borders is very shocked by the murder of journalist José Cândido Amorim Pinto of Rádio Comunitária Alternativa on 1 July in Carpina, in the northeastern state of Pernambuco. Amorim, who was also a municipal councillor, covered corruption and nepotism. News to go further RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America News Receive email alerts BrazilAmericas Organisation 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Reports RSF_en May 13, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders Reporters Without Borders today said it was “deeply shocked” by the 1 July murder of investigative journalist José Cândido Amorim Pinto of Rádio Comunitária Alternativa in Carpina, in the northeastern state of Pernambuco.”We are every worried about the impact of this murder on investigative reporting in northeastern Brazil and we call on the local, state and federal authorities to do everything possible to find out who did it and to reaffirm the rule of law, which is an essential condition for press freedom,” the organisation said.Known as “Jota Cândido” to his listeners, Amorim was ambushed at 6:40 a.m. as he parked his car outside the radio station in Carpina (50 km from Recife). Two men shot him about 20 times before making off on a motorcycle.For the past 19 years, Amorim had produced and presented an investigative programme on Rádio Comunitária Alternativa in which he reported on corruption cases. The targets of his investigations included local mayor Mandel Botafogo and, on the eve of his murder, local parliamentary representative Antonio Moraes.Amorim was also a member of the Carpina municipal council. As such he had proposed a by-law to combat nepotism which Botafogo had opposed.He had been the target of threats for about six months and was injured when two men on a motorcycle fired on his car on 21 May.Speaking on Rádio Folha, parliamentary representative Carla Lapa accused Moraes and Botafogo of ordering Amorim’s murder.Amorim was killed the same day that a demonstration in defence of press freedom was staged by students, trade unionists and NGOs outside the headquarters of the Jornal do Commercio newspaper in Recife. Follow the news on Brazil April 15, 2021 Find out more News Alarm after two journalists murdered in Brazil April 27, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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A synergistic approach for evaluating climate model output for ecological applications

first_imgIncreasing concern about the impacts of climate change on ecosystems is prompting ecologists and ecosystem managers to seek reliable projections of physical drivers of change. The use of global climate models in ecology is growing, although drawing ecologically meaningful conclusions can be problematic. The expertise required to access and interpret output from climate and earth system models is hampering progress in utilizing them most effectively to determine the wider implications of climate change. To address this issue, we present a joint approach between climate scientists and ecologists that explores key challenges and opportunities for progress. As an exemplar, our focus is the Southern Ocean, notable for significant change with global implications, and on sea ice, given its crucial role in this dynamic ecosystem. We combined perspectives to evaluate the representation of sea ice in global climate models. With an emphasis on ecologically-relevant criteria (sea ice extent and seasonality) we selected a subset of eight models that reliably reproduce extant sea ice distributions. While the model subset shows a similar mean change to the full ensemble in sea ice extent (approximately 50% decline in winter and 30% decline in summer), there is a marked reduction in the range. This improved the precision of projected future sea ice distributions by approximately one third, and means they are more amenable to ecological interpretation. We conclude that careful multidisciplinary evaluation of climate models, in conjunction with ongoing modeling advances, should form an integral part of utilizing model output.last_img read more

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The impact of ocean acidification

first_imgFor more than a century, the world’s oceans have been becoming steadily more acidic as they soak up ever-increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and the impacts can be fatal for invertebrates such as shellfish, plankton, and corals that rely on dissolved minerals to build their shells and exoskeletons.For at least some fish, though, the story may be more complicated.Using precise CT scans of skate skeletons, Valentina Di Santo, a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Evolutionary Biology Professor George Lauder, was able to show that, while ocean acidification has had led to a drop in the mineralization of some parts of the skeletons, it has had the opposite effect in other areas. The first-of-its-kind study suggests that continued ocean warming and acidification could impact everything from how fish move to how they eat. The findings are described in a Jan. 9 paper published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.“This result was very surprising,” Di Santo said. “Until now, most research had been focused on the mineralization of the exoskeletons of invertebrates, because we know they experience very dramatic impacts from acidification, but nobody had looked at what happens to vertebrates.”One reason for the lack of such studies, she said, is simply physiological: Unlike shellfish or coral, fish have internal skeletons.“For the most part, people thought fish would be pretty resilient,” she said. “Certainly acidification stresses them — their metabolic rates go up and studies have shown behavior changes — but they have managed to adjust. But the more we investigate, the more we see that there are strong negative effects, even in the skeleton.”Though she ended up finding it, Di Santo wasn’t searching for evidence of how acidification was impacting fish skeletons.,“I was looking at skate embryos that live off the coast here in New England, and studying the effect of developmental acclimatization to ocean acidification on their physiology and behavior,” she said. “I was able dissect out some of the parts of the skates and place them in a CT scanner. It was very exploratory; I didn’t know what I would find.”What she found, Di Santo said, was a reduction in the mineralized outer layer, or tiles, of the cartilage skeleton in the skates’ wings.“Those mineralized tiles are important, because skates don’t have a swim bladder, so [the tiles] give them a very light but very strong skeleton,” she said. “What may be happening is that, with ocean warming, the skates are growing faster and the mineralization just can’t keep up.”At the same time, Di Santo said, the study revealed an increase in mineralization in skates’ jaws and crura, the modified pelvic fins the fish use to “walk” on the ocean floor.“What’s going on is that the skates are very good at buffering acidosis,” Di Santo said, “and the result is that they wind up with very high phosphate levels in their blood. I think they are then dumping that excess into those tissues, and the result is more mineralization.“In some ways, this could be viewed as an advantage,” she continued. “It could mean stronger jaws and could increase the efficiency of walking with their crura. But the flip side is that it also means they are heavier, and it’s already metabolically expensive for them to swim long distances, so a heavier skeleton will reduce their capacity to migrate.”Going forward, Di Santo said she hopes to examine whether similar effects are found in bony fish. Other studies have suggested that high CO2 levels can lead to deformities in fish — but few have tested whether they are connected to acidification.Ultimately, Di Santo said, the study not only highlights the continuing impact of climate change, but also demonstrates that those impacts can reach into surprising areas.“I presented this work at a conference this summer,” she said, “and people were shocked. What this work really demonstrates is that the effects of climate change are more wide-ranging than we ever thought.”This research was supported with funding from the Steven Berkeley Marine Conservation Fellowship, the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University, and an Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative Grant.last_img read more

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Why are we here: Does your credit union mission inspire its employees?

first_imgAs we all refine our strategic plans and look beyond this year’s successes to yet another New Year, leaders should be challenged to ask themselves, “Are our employees engaged and focused on a mission-driven purpose tied to members and successful strategies?”Over my 31-year leadership career in the credit union industry, through the evolution from those early years without the internet, email or PCs, until today’s focus on digital transformation and member experience, one thing has been a constant with our industry. That is, successful credit unions foster a mission-driven culture that attracts and engages talented team members. And the culture drives service excellence.In a recent edition of the Harvard Business Review, an article titled, “Why are we here” caught my eye. The author’s premise was that, if we want employees who are more engaged and productive, we have to give them a purpose – one concretely tied to customers and our strategy.Well, obviously that is what we should all want but how do we do it?The article suggests that a purpose or mission statement is critically important and it needs to be continuously reinforced organizationally. As CEOs and management staff, we’re responsible for creating a powerful purpose or mission statement that clearly articulates strategy and that motivates employees. But this is so much more than words. It may begin with the words, but it has to extend into how they are communicated and reinforced throughout the credit union’s day-to-day operations, its website, marketing materials, employee reward systems and staff training.Equally important, the HBR article suggests that delivering on the purpose includes several key elements. They are:Be a magnet for the right talentConnect with intention across boundariesInvest behind your purpose, andMake sure your leaders model your purposeToday, it’s so easy to navigate through any credit union’s website to find their mission statement or elevator value pitch. These aren’t always the official mission statements but they articulate the credit union’s value proposition clearly and succinctly to current and prospective members:California-based Schoolsfirst Credit Union promises this:“Having served school employees for more than 80 years, we understand the financial challenges you face both in your classroom and at home. We design our products and services with you in mind, creating an ever-growing number of lower-cost, higher-quality offerings in an environment where your character counts more than your credit score. Compassion and a commitment to excellence are the promises we make to each other, to the educational system, and to every Member, especially those who need us the most.”That’s pretty compelling. And surely employees find meaning in their work delivering on that promise.At Michigan-based One Detroit Credit Union, and as a smaller urban credit union, their value pitch reads like this:“Our mission is to impact and change lives.We help people in our community who have been overlooked by the mainstream banking system by providing them with credible, fair and reasonably priced financial products and services.”I love this emphasis on a purpose-driven mission to help those who need it the most.The world’s largest credit union, Navy Federal puts it this way:“Since 1933, Navy Federal has grown from seven members to over eight million members. And, since that time, our mission has remained the same: to serve and enrich the lives of those in the military community.”That defines purpose very succinctly and powerfully.And Pennsylvania’s largest credit union, PSECU professes this on their website:“Opportunity starts here. Our free checking, ATM rebates*, cash rewards credit card, and low rate loans will help keep more of your money with you.”I love that emphasis on helping people keep more of their money.But to deliver on purpose, let’s go back to the four tips from the HRB article mentioned earlier.First, being a magnet for the right talent means putting the right people in the right roles to achieve the credit union’s goals and competitive distinctiveness. For most credit unions, especially smaller ones, it’s unrealistic to achieve this in all operational areas. So, prioritizing the most pressing functions that need improvement, and committing to staffing excellence there, will carry the day. At any point in time, resource reinvention might be more pressing in product development, finance or sales culture.So, prioritizing the areas where staffing excellence is most needed, is a critical staff for resource-strapped credit unions.Second, to connect with intention across boundaries means that, once you have the right high-priority talent, the credit union needs to be configured to allow the team to accomplish the credit union’s objectives.Again, this is so logical but so much easier said than done.A popular concept is to create cross-functional teams. For instance, an innovation team or lending enhancement team to improve member experience. But cross-functional teams require prioritization and long-term commitment and lots of communication to avoid just creating another round of unproductive meetings.Just as prioritizing talent improvements makes sense, so does the prioritization of cross-functional teams to address the credit union’s most pressing planning objectives.Third, investing behind your purpose…Few things are as demoralizing for staff as being asked to improve something without adequate resources and management commitment to follow through.So, for instance, if a credit union wants to commit to a cross-functional process for improving member experience in mortgage lending, management needs to commit to staffing changes, enhancements, meeting processes, investment in technology platforms and other identified tactics in order to meet the objective.CU Solutions Group recently acquired a company called, MemberXP. The platform is used by over 100 credit unions large and small.MXProdigy lets you uncover the highs and the lows of multi-touch member experiences such as lending with pinpoint precision. In today’s omnichannel world, a typical loan might originate on the Web, get approved by a loan processor, and be closed by a telephone representative. That’s a great journey for the member, but there are plenty of places to stumble along the way. MXProdigy breaks omnichannel and multi-touch experiences into distinct parts for scoring and analysis so you can take action where it’s critical.This is one example of a product that requires an investment by the credit union. Investing smartly behind your purpose is so important.And finally, fourth, making sure leaders model your purpose…I can’t tell you how many times my staff and other stakeholders have heard me reference CUSG’s mission statement of helping credit unions serve, grow and remain strong, so that together, we can make an impact on people’s lives.But as leaders, we need to do more than say the words. As previously mentioned, we have to commit to staffing enhancements, the organizing of teams and the investments behind top objectives. We have to walk the talk.Longtime Michigan football coaching legend Bo Schembechler led the University of Michigan’s football team for 20 years between 1969 to 1989. During those years, the team won almost 80% of their games and won or shared 13 Big 10 championships in the pre-BCS playoff era.He famously said…“When your team is winning, be ready to be tough, because winning can make you soft. On the other hand, when your team is losing, stick by them. Keep believing.”In today’s record-long expansion economy, most credit unions are winning and producing great performance metrics. But when times are good, it’s easy to get soft and complacent. The largest banks are investing heavily in improved customer experience and digital banking. Credit unions need to do the same.And when the next recession comes around, that’s when leaders especially need to invest in and believe in their team.Great tools like Member XP’s member experience platform can help with that.More broadly, applying principles like those laid out in the Harvard Business Review article can make for great plans that will truly impact the creation of the right organizational culture for attracting and retaining the talent that will make us successful in good times and bad. 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Dave Adams Dave Adams is  President / Chief Executive Officer of CU Solutions Group. The  CUSG office is located in Livonia, Michigan.Mr. Adams joined the Michigan Credit Union League in August of … Web: www.CUSolutionsGroup.com Detailslast_img read more

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Leon Balogun seeks career rebirth at Wigan

first_imgRelatedPosts Gerrard gets Aribo, Leon Balogun boost Several Chelsea players test positive for COVID-19 – Media reports Injury blow for Aribo, Leon Balogun Nigerian international, Leon Balogun, has expressed desire to restart his career after joining Wigan Athletic on loan from Brighton & Hove Albion on Friday. Speaking to Latics TV after his first training session at the Wigan Athletic Training Centre, Balogun said: “I had a good two days to organise some things back in Brighton and now I’m glad I’m here. “I drove up on Sunday, it was a nice peaceful drive, but I was happy to get the journey done because it’s quite a long way. “Joining up with the lads was the perfect timing. I congratulated them on the win against Leeds on Saturday, it was massive for the team. “It was really good to start the week like that, with that kind of spirit. The lads who played in the game tried to keep things low key because they were still in recovery. “I got the chance to meet some of the young kids as well and my first training session was fun, my first day made me very happy to be here. “I’m very impressed with the facilities here. I love the showers, which is a bit funny, but everyone at Brighton will understand. “At Brighton, it’s either hot or cold, here you can change the temperature.” Speaking of Brighton, the 31-year-old explained how former Latics favourite Dan Burn had a part to play in his loan move to the DW Stadium. He said: “I spoke to Dan (Burn) before I travelled here. “He’s a great guy and I know that he has a very successful past at this club, and he’s doing very well at Brighton. “He told me about the manager and the group because he’s still in touch with a fair amount of them. “He said it’s a great group here and a good team, who play good football.” With Latics heading into a home double-header against Preston North End and Middlesbrough off the back of consecutive victories, Balogun added: “The season hasn’t gone as the club wanted so far, but from what I have seen from the footage I watched when I was trying to gather some information about the club, I like what I see. “Now it’s on us to take on this challenge. The win on Saturday was massive and it’s another step in the right direction. I’m happy to come in and play my part in mastering this challenge together.”Tags: Brighton & Hove AlbionLatics TVLeon BalogunWigan Athletic Training Centrelast_img read more

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Leafs host Prospects Camp at NDCC Arena

first_imgPlayers arrive Friday afternoon for the Camp Orientation at 4:30 p.m. before taking to the ice at 6 p.m.The first scrimmage game is Saturday at 1:30 p.m.Game action continues Sunday morning followed by the All Star Game at 1 p.m. Sunday.Nelson Leafs finished last season fourth in the Murdoch Division with a 23-17-2-4 record.Beaver Valley Nitehawks eliminated the Leafs in the first round of the KIJHL playoffs.The season was not a total bust for Nelson as the Leafs Robson Cramer was selected top defenceman in the KIJHL and Neil Murdoch Division.Cramer, along with teammate Darnel St. Pierre, signed a letter to play next season for Simon Fraser of the BC Intercollegiate Hockey League.Leaf captain Aaron Dunlap will also play in the BCIHL with the Eastern Washington Eagles in Spokane. When the Kimberley Dynamiters took to the ice to celebrate winning the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League championship last month in Kamloops the race for the 2016 title began.The Nelson Leafs hope to get a jump on the upcoming campaign when the Heritage City franchise hosts a Prospects Camp beginning Friday at the NDCC Arena.“The purpose of this weekend is to show your ability to play at the Junior Level, while getting an opportunity to learn more about the Nelson Leafs, meet the coaching staff, tour our facilities and enjoy the City of Nelson,” coach and GM Dave McLellan said on the Leafs’ website.The camp is close to full with only a few spots available for forwards.last_img read more

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Sun Devils win at USC’s expense

first_img“It’s very, very, very disappointing,” USC forward Nick Young said. “This could have been one of those games that put us in the tournament.” ASU (7-19, 1-14) was on the verge of becoming the first team ever to go winless in the Pac-10. However, the Sun Devils had been on the cusp of breaking through for weeks. Their last five losses had all been by six points or less, including against No. 5 UCLA on Thursday. After ending a 21-game losing streak against Arizona in Tucson on Thursday, USC players were talking about not wanting to be the team to lose to the Sun Devils. TEMPE, Ariz – Tim Floyd warned his team as early as last Monday that a dangerous opponent was upcoming. That he was talking about last-place Arizona State when the Trojans hadn’t won on the road at Arizona in 22 years was a bit perplexing, but he apparently knew what he was talking about. With a chance to reach 20 victories Sunday and all but lock up a spot in the NCAA Tournament, the Trojans instead suffered the dishonor of being the first team to lose to the Sun Devils in Pacific 10 Conference play. Arizona State looked like the NCAA Tournament-bound team and No. 22 USC like the cellar dwellers over the final 17 minutes, as ASU pulled away for a 68-58 upset at Wells Fargo Arena. center_img That pressure might have gotten to the Trojans down the stretch. USC led 32-23 three minutes into the second half, then were outscored 45-26 for the remainder of the game. “You have so much going on in your head, like you don’t want to get this loss,” Young said. “… We didn’t settle down.” The Sun Devils went on a quick 10-0 run to take the lead, started by a dunk from Etiwanda High School product Jeff Pendergraph and finished with a 3-pointer from Derek Glasser. Glasser, a freshman point guard who backed out of an oral commitment to USC in order to attend Arizona State, hit another 3-pointer to finish off a 7-0 run that put the Sun Devils ahead 47-39 lead with 6:22 left. Arizona State’s zone defense frustrated USC from there. Young had just two of his 11 points in the second half. Freshman forward Taj Gibson, who had scored in double figures in 19 of USC’s previous 26 games, was held scoreless for the first time. “Every coach in the league has been talking about it, how they’ve been so close,” Floyd said. “I think everyone knew they were going to get one at some point. They just played better than we did.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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This is our right that we fought for: Zuma

first_img7 May 2014South African President Jacob Zuma cast his vote in the country’s fifth democratic elections at Ntolwane Primary School in KwaNxamalala, near his birthplace in Nkandla, KwaZulu-Natal on Wednesday morning.The President last voted at the school – which is just a stone’s throw away from his home – in the local government elections in 2011 and during the 2009 general elections.He was greeted by a large local and international media contingent, as well as jovial locals, who ululated upon seeing him. Various security personnel were also present.South Africa’s number one citizen arrived just after 10am and joined the queue of voters, not wanting any special treatment. His first wife, MaKhumalo, stood behind him. They were accompanied by Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) chairperson Pansy Tlakula.People tried to shake the President’s hand, while others took pictures with their mobile phones.Speaking to journalists after casting his vote, Zuma said he felt “good and very enthusiastic”, as the day marked the culmination of months of canvassing by all political parties.“It feels good that I have just voted, and I hope that all voters will cast their votes freely, without any problems. This is our right that we fought for, among other rights we have … My wish is that throughout the country, voting must be peaceful.”Asked who he had voted for, Zuma laughed and said: “It is a secret.”Political party leaders cast their votesMany political party heavyweights also voted in their home towns on Wednesday morning. Democratic Alliance (DA) leader Helen Zille made her mark at St Paul’s Anglican Church in Rondebosch in Cape Town just after 9am, accompanied by her husband, Johann Maree.Zille is the premier of the Western Cape, and the DA has been pushing to retain the province and increase its support in the national and provincial ballot.Agang SA leader Mamphela Ramphele surprised voters when she arrived to make her mark at the Sea Point library voting station in Cape Town.Julius Malema, the leader of the new kid on the block, the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF), arrived two hours after the voting station opened at Mponegele Primary School in his hometown Seshego, north-west of Polokwane, in Limpopo province, while Congress of the People (Cope) leader Mosiuoa Lekota voted in his hometown of Bloemfontein in the Free State.In KwaZulu-Natal, Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi cast his vote in Ulundi, as did National Freedom Party (NFP) president Zanele kaMagwaza-Msibi. Msibi made her mark at the Thengisangaye Primary School, a school she helped to build.The late Nelson Mandela cast the first vote in South Africa’s first democratic election 20 years ago, on 27 April 1994, at Ohlange High School in Kwa-Zulu Natal. Mandela’s vote on that historic day marked the final nail in the apartheid coffin, signalling the dawn of a new democratic dispensation of majority rule in the country.Source: SAnews.govlast_img read more

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