Tag: 杭州夜网

Preserving Africa’s culinary heritage

first_img Recent grad Nick DiGiovanni competes on ‘MasterChef’ Cooking up a TV career Related Law School grad Nisha Vora left the legal life for vegan cooking Midunu, which hosts communal-style pop-up dinners, started after she moved back to Ghana in 2013 and began growing increasingly concerned about the possible loss of the continent’s culinary heritage.Born in Ghana but raised in New York, Atadika traveled around Africa for years as a humanitarian worker with the U.N. She grew alarmed by the continent’s creeping reliance on imported food. By 2025, Africa’s annual food import bill, currently $35 billion, is estimated to shoot up to $110 billion. There is also a growing view of traditional cuisine as food of the poor, she said.During the talk, Atadika also provided an overview of cultural, economic, and geographical food tendencies and preferences in Ghana and different parts of Africa. In the Ethiopian highlands, for instance, she noted that cattle farming is a major source of revenue, so while people tend to eat a lot of dairy, they do not a lot of meat because it would draw on their wealth.Midunu, which means “Let us eat” in the Ewe language spoken in southern Ghana and neighboring Togo, is not Atadika’s first venture into the culinary world. In Senegal, she started the country’s first pop-up restaurant. The nomadic restaurant is, however, her best-known success. Atadika has been featured in dozens of news outlets, including NPR and CNN, and her more refined, tradition-inspired dishes were featured at a state dinner in Ghana for the Danish Embassy and at the James Beard Foundation, a culinary arts organization in New York.Atadika sees her work with Midunu as helping tell Africa’s story on a plate. “I became a chef because I felt there were perspectives and angles and things that I could do using food as a medium,” she said.The lecture series is organized by the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and is based on the undergraduate course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter.” The next talk is Dec. 2 and will feature “Dialogue Between Science and Cooking at El Celler de Can Roca. Evolution.”  A full schedule, including the lecture topics, are available online. Planting herself in the right career Think about a dish that makes you feel at home — warm cinnamon rolls, potato pancakes, soup dumplings, pupusas, pierogis, creamy piles of corn pudding.Now, Selassie Atadika told the audience in the latest installment of the “Science and Cooking” lecture series, “Imagine if this dish no longer existed.”And with that Atadika, food expert and owner of the Midunu food company in Accra, Ghana, segued into a talk about her efforts to keep Africa’s culinary heritage intact by encouraging the use of traditional cooking methods and ingredients.Her goal is to keep dishes such as moi moi pudding, hearty okra soup, and spicy jollof rice in the mainstream in a way that nudges Ghanaians toward using locally sourced ingredients and thinking about viewing them as haute cuisine.Atadika calls her approach new African cuisine because of the modern spin it puts on meals that are well-known across the continent, but are often being passed up in favor of quicker, more convenient alternatives that often use imported ingredients.During her lecture, Atadika walked the 150-person-crowd through how she integrates native plants and grains — like millet, aromatic prekese fruit, and the moringa leaf, which has medicinal properties — into her cooking and uses techniques like drying, smoking, and fermenting that have long been used in the region.Another goal is to document how and why these dishes were made in the first place, she said. For instance, many of the slow-cooking techniques used on the continent came out of necessity. “We’ve adapted all kinds of cooking techniques to make sure we don’t lose our food” in the extreme heat, Atadika said. “I became a chef because I felt there were perspectives and angles and things that I could do using food as a medium.” — Selassie Atadikalast_img read more

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UW to host IU, UM

first_imgThe 11th-ranked Wisconsin volleyball team willcontinue its home stand this week, facing off against Illinois Wednesday andMichigan Friday.Wisconsin split its series last weekend, losing to MichiganState last Friday and beating Northwestern Saturday. The loss to the Spartanswas the Badgers’ first loss to an unranked opponent since September 2006.”We were definitely pushing too hard and pressing a lotwhere we really need to sit back and play our game and relax,” senior setterJackie Simpson said.Despite dropping four spots in the polls, the Badgers areexcited to get back on the court this week. Head coach Pete Waite said ashorter week to prepare did not hinder his team. He believes it allows the teamto carry the momentum it gained against Northwestern into the next match.Last weekend, the Badgers were plagued by service errors,something the team would like to improve for the next two matches. In theirthird game against Northwestern, they had six service errors. In practice, theteam was able to work hard to make its serves more accurate.”It’s a matter of if you can really put a punch on the ball,make it move and get the passers on their heels,” Waite said. “That’s what wehave to do a better job of. We were doing a good job of that earlier in theseason, and we’ve got to get back to doing that.”The team also focused on playing with a more relaxed style.Waite told his players they need to play aggressive without trying to be “tooperfect” and to play with a passion. “He said that we were kinda being tense and stressed outabout things,” senior co-captain Taylor Reineke said. “He thinks we need torelax a little and just have fun and enjoy our sport, you know, and we reallydidn’t do that this weekend. That’s one thing we are working on now.”Against Illinois, Wisconsin will have to show the passionWaite talked about in practice. The last time the two teams met, Wisconsin won3-1, and they are currently on a five-match winning streak against Illinois.The Illini’s primary weapons are freshmen outside hitterLaura DeBruler and libero Ashley Edinger. Edinger, who is third in the Big Tenin digs, had 37 against Northwestern Friday. DeBruler leads the Big Ten inkills with 485 and averages five kills per game. “As a freshman, [DeBruler] is putting up huge numbers,”Waite said. “She’s a freshman of the year candidate in the conference and veryfew people have slowed her down, so she is good on offense and defense.” Though the Badgers have won their last four meetings againstthe Wolverines, the game against Michigan will prove to be as big as theirfirst meeting this year, when the teams were ranked ninth and 10th respectively.Since losing to the Badgers 3-0, the Wolverines have lostsix of their last 11 matches and are on a three-game losing streak. They havesince dropped out of the top 25 as well.Though they have not been performing well as of late,Michigan still ranks in the top five of most of the major categories, includingteam kills, assists and hitting percentage. It also leads the Big Ten in digs,averaging 18.33 as a team per game. “Michigan was ranked in the top ten earlier this year,”Waite said. “They’ve been taking some losses here and there and splitting onthe weekend, so they dropped out, but they are still a very strong team.”The Wolverines are led by senior outside hitter KatieBrudzinski, who ranks fifth in the Big Ten in kills, averaging 4.41 per game.She also leads the league in service aces, averaging almost .5 per game. UW will attempt to sweep the series this week and hopeleague leader PSU drops a match, as the Badgers are two games behind the NittanyLions and play them in College Park next weekend. But, the team is not worriedabout future games; it is focused on the task at hand. “I think we have always done a good job on focusing on thewhole ‘1-0’ concept, and I think that is something we have always done as ateam, since I’ve been here this past four years,” Simpson said. “The Big Ten issuch a strong conference and anything can happen on any given night, and weknow that.”last_img read more

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Young Football Players of B&H Against Spain Today

first_imgThe young football representation of B&H today in Zenica will welcome the Spanish team for qualifications of the European Championship 2015  for  players up to 21 years old, which will be held in the Czech Republic.The coach of the B&H team Vlado Jagodić at the press conference said that there is no need for comments in regard to the Spanish team because they are European and World Champions and the last game that they lost was four years ago in Netherlands.Jagodić believes that his team with good tactics and dedication on the field can surprise the favored opponents and achieve positive results.The young team of B&H will play against Spain today at the stadium ”Bilino polje” at 20:30.(Source: Fena)last_img read more

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Rural areas struggle with covering Emergency Medical Services

first_imgDES MOINES — When you call 911 in parts of rural Iowa, there’s no guarantee an ambulance will be available, as emergency medical services aren’t considered essential, like fire or police.Mark Sachen, president of the Iowa Emergency Medical Services Association, says three-fourths of local departments are volunteer-run. Because the service isn’t guaranteed by local or state funding, many get their money from billing patients or bake sales. Sachen says, “I think we’re to the point now where the demands on the system are far exceeding the available resources available to provide those services.”In the past five years, Iowa saw a 4% decrease in the number of registered EMTs. Fourteen counties are covered by just one ambulance service while Worth County has none for its 400 square miles. In Tripoli, director Kip Ladage has just a few EMTs to cover 99 square miles in Bremer County. He notes staff shortages in neighboring areas create a domino effect.“From six in the morning to six at night we probably have two, maybe three, if we’re lucky that are available,” Ladage says. “What if Tripoli can’t cover and Denver is already out and can’t cover. Then where do we go? Then that response time just gets that much longer.”Wright County supervisor Karl Helgevold says voters in 2018 overwhelmingly approved a property tax levy to make Wright County the first in the state to declare EMS services as essential. That raised a half-million dollars a year for training, equipment, and a countywide EMS coordinator. Helgevold feels it’s something the state needs to ensure. “Would it be great if the state had a way to mandate it and fund it in a perfect world? Yeah, but we don’t live in that type of world right now,” Helgevold says. “So we need to do what we need to do and provide a good service to our citizens.”One proposal in the Iowa legislature would make it easier to follow Wright County’s example. It would allow counties to set up partnerships and use existing local taxes to fund EMS without voter approval. Representative Bobby Kaufmann, a Republican from Wilton, doesn’t think the service should be declared essential at the state level as it could impose a cookie-cutter set of requirements.Kaufmann says, “I still think it should be done county-by-county because there are different mechanisms that work for different areas.” Kauffman is asking the state to appropriate about five-million dollars toward the state’s various EMS departments.last_img read more

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Meat processors must remove legal threats and agree to address key issues – McConalogue

first_imgFianna Fáil Spokesperson on Agriculture Charlie McConalogue TD has called on meat processors to remove legal threats and agree to address key outstanding issues in reconvened beef talks.“The previous round of talks were unsuccessful due to the failure of meat processors to properly address a number of key issues in the beef supply chain and they must now indicate a willingness to address these in order to resolve the current beef crisis”, said Deputy McConalogue.“Issues such as the 30 months age limit, the four movement rule, and the 70-day residency requirement must be up for negotiation if farmers are to accept that meat-processors are serious about addressing their concerns. “I welcome the unanimous support at today’s meeting of the Oireachtas Agriculture Committee for Fianna Fáil’s proposal mandating the Minister for Agriculture to seek the immediate resumption of talks and calling for meat processors to demonstrate a willingness to address these issues as part of a renewed talks process. The Committee also unanimously agreed the necessity for retailers to be included in talks.“Meat processors must accept that they have demonstrated no reasonable basis for the continuation of these unjustified requirements.“The 30 month age limit puts undue pressure on farmers to sell cattle and contributes to a spike in supply at the back end of each year when a significant number of animals reach the 30 month threshold.“With regard to the four movement rule, meat processors have not demonstrated any rationale as to why animals that have moved more than four times between quality assured farms should not be paid the quality assurance bonus. “The 70 day residency requirement puts an unfair restriction on famers selling their animals through marts before slaughter, removing an outlet for smaller farmers in particular to generate competition for their finished animals.“Meat processors need to realise that it is by agreeing to address these key issues in resumed talks that the current beef crisis can be addressed. They must now remove any legal threats to farmers and enable meaningful talks to proceed,” concluded Deputy McConalogue.Meat processors must remove legal threats and agree to address key issues – McConalogue was last modified: September 5th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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