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SRH vs MI, IPL 2021: THE GAME IS ON! Kane Williamson…

first_img Cricket ICC WTC Final LIVE commentary: AIR, DD Sports to live stream & broadcast India vs New Zealand for free Cricket Cricket WTC Final 2021: India vs New Zealand Full Squad, Schedule, Live Streaming, Date, Time, Venue all you need to know World Test Championship final Cricket Cricket SRH vs MI, IPL 2021: THE GAME IS ON! Kane Williamson vs Rohit Sharma in Delhi at 7:30 pm – Follow Live Updates SRH vs MI, IPL 2021 – Kane Williamson vs Rohit Sharma: Even as the prospect of Indian Premier League (IPL) 2021 postponement continues to loom large, the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) has said that the Tuesday clash between Sunrisers Hyderabad and Mumbai Indians is on. The two teams will lock horns at the Arun Jaitley stadium. “The is very much on. We have not received any update on the postponement of the match,” an SRH official told InsideSport.According to a report by Cricbuzz, BCCI had some communication to the Hyderabad franchise, had sought clarity about their readiness for the clash as Mumbai Indians were in contact with Chennai Super Kings in their last fixture on May 1. CricketIndian premier leagueIndian Premier League 2021 WTC Final Day 3 LIVE Score: Latham, Conway provide solid start; NZ 24/0 (16 ovs)- Follow Live Updates SRH vs MI, IPL 2021: With just one win from seven matches, there are problems aplenty for SRH. (IndianExpress) Cricket By Kunal Dhyani – May 4, 2021 Cricket Cricket Cricket center_img WTC Final 2021 LIVE: 5 Ways to watch India vs New Zealand World Test Championship LIVE Streaming for free Facebook Twitter WTC Final Live- Ind vs NZ: Kyle Jamieson bags 5th five-wicket haul in 8th Test, rattles India in WTC final Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter WTC Final Live: Virat Kohli continues century drought as Kyle Jamieson wins IPL team rivalry Wimbledon 2021 LIVE streaming: When, where and how to watch year’s third Grand Slam’ in you country, India by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May Like247 Sports50 Best College Football Players Of All Time247 SportsUndocio.comUnlocking the Success of Digital Transformation with Active Intelligencecio.comUndoPhotoStickHow To Back Up All Your Old Photos In SecondsPhotoStickUndoALSO READ|ICC Test Rankings: Great news, Virat Kohli’s team India finishes April Month as No. 1However, BCCI is also wary of the fact that anymore positive case would put them on the backfoot. “In the event of any other positive cases, there could be a rethink, at this stage the game is on,” sources told Cricbuzz.SRH vs MI, IPL 2021 Preview: Resurgent Rohit Sharma and Co vs bottom-placed Kane Williamson’s Orange ArmyBack in the groove after two consecutive wins, defending champions Mumbai Indians will be firm favourites to put it past the turbulence-hit and bottom-placed SunRisers Hyderabad.Mumbai will enter the game after their four-wicket win over in-form Chennai Super Kings courtesy Kieron Pollard’s blitzkrieg.Also Read: ICC WTC Final: India and New Zealand might travel together to Southampton after IPL 2021, says Players’ Union ChiefSunRisers, in contrast, suffered a humiliating 55-run loss to Rajasthan Royals, their sixth in seven games this season. They are also battling a transitional phase in which Kane Williamson has taken over captaincy from an out-of-form David Warner, leaving him disappointed.SRH vs MI, IPL 2021: Mumbai Indians firepowerMumbai openers Rohit Sharma (250 runs) and Quinton De Kock (155 runs) would be itching to give the five-time champions another strong platform and also convert their starts into big scores.Mumbai’s hard-hitting middle-order has clicked in the last two games, which would be quite pleasing for the team management. Pollard (168 runs), who blazed his way to a match-winning 87 off 34 balls in the last game, would be keen to continue from where he left.The likes of Krunal Pandya (100 runs), Hardik Pandya (52 runs) and the flamboyant Suryakumar Yadav (173 runs) can be destructive on their day and the trio wouldbe aiming to fire in unison.Also, it remains to be seen if Mumbai plays Ishan Kishan or Jayant Yadav in place of all-rounder James Neesham, who neither scored big nor was able to pick up wickets.Also READ: ICC Rankings: New Zealand is world’s No.1 ODI team, Check where…However, the Mumbai bowlers would need to forget the hammering received at the hands of the CSK batsmen and start afresh.The pace duo of Jasprit Bumrah (6 wickets) and Trent Boult (8 wickets) have been exceptional at the death and would pose a big threat to the SRH batting unit, which has been inconsistent at best.Leg-spinner Rahul Chahar (11 wickets) has been the MI’s main wicket-taker, but he would need support from Krunal, who has just three scalps.The duo would need to keep things tight to contain the SRH batters. Pollard, also picked up two important wickets in the last game and can fill in the role of fifth or sixth bowler. However, there are problems aplenty for SRH.SRH vs MI, IPL 2021: Sunrisers Hyderabad’s problems aplentyThey are over-reliant on their top-order, especially Jonny Bairstow (248 runs), but their middle-order has faltered most often.Against RR, they dropped Warner and opened with Manish Pandey and Jonny Bairstow, with Williamson coming in at three. If they persist with the same line-up, the three need to fire on all cylinders.Also, the likes of Vijay Shankar (58 runs), Kedar Jadhav (40 runs), Abdul Samad (36 runs) and Mohammed Nabi (31 runs), if he plays, will have to get some runs for the side to have any chance of building a momentum.On the bowling front, star leg-spinner Rashid Khan has been the pick of the bowlers with 10 wickets but pacers Bhuvneshwar Kumar (3 wickets) and Khaleel Ahmed (4 wickets) would need to find their form too.It remains to be seen if Sandeep Sharma plays again or makes way for Siddharth Kaul.SRH vs MI: SquadsMumbai Indians Squad: Rohit Sharma (C), Adam Milne, Aditya Tare, Anmolpreet Singh, Anukul Roy, Arjun Tendulkar, Chris Lynn, Dhawal Kulkarni, Hardik Pandya, Ishan Kishan, James Neesham, Jasprit Bumrah, Jayant Yadav, Kieron Pollard, Krunal Pandya, Marco Jansen, Mohsin Khan, Nathan Coulter-Nile, Piyush Chawla, Quinton De Kock (wk), Rahul Chahar, Saurabh Tiwary, Suryakumar Yadav, Trent Boult, Yudhvir Singh.Sunrisers Hyderabad Squad: Kane Williamson (C), David Warner, Jonny Bairstow (wk), Manish Pandey, Sreevats Goswami, Wriddhiman Saha, Priyam Garg, Vijay Shankar, Abhishek Sharma, Abdul Samad, Virat Singh, Jason Holder, Mohammad Nabi, Rashid Khan, Shahbaz Nadeem, Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Sandeep Sharma, Khaleel Ahmed, Siddarth Kaul, Basil Thampi, Jagadeesha Suchith, Kedar Jadhav, Mujeeb-ur-Rahman. WI vs SA 2nd Test Day 3 Live: Start delayed due to rain, SA lead by 149 runs – Follow Live Updates IND vs NZ Live Streaming for free with Jio, Airtel and Vodafone Idea, Check out the best Recharge Plan TAGSBCCIIPL 2021SRH vs MISRH vs MI match SHARE WTC Final LIVE: Muttiah Muralitharan voted ‘Greatest Men’s Test Bowler’ of 21st century Cricket YourBump15 Actors That Hollywood Banned For LifeYourBump|SponsoredSponsoredUndoSenior Living | Search AdsNew Senior Apartments Coming to Scottsdale (Take A Look at The Prices)Senior Living | Search Ads|SponsoredSponsoredUndoMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStory|SponsoredSponsoredUndoPost FunThese Twins Were Named “Most Beautiful In The World,” Wait Until You See Them TodayPost Fun|SponsoredSponsoredUndoMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleNow she has a normal job.MoneyPail|SponsoredSponsoredUndoPast Factory4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!Past Factory|SponsoredSponsoredUndo Previous articleIPL 2021 Covid-19 Updates: England Cricket Board to their players, ‘decide for yourself whether you want to stay or comeback’Next articleIPL 2021: KKR’s Varun Chakravarthy, Sandeep Warrier test positive for COVID-19, Pat Cummins and others isolated Kunal DhyaniSports Tech enthusiast, he reports on Sports Tech industry and writes on sports products. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

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Willdale Limited (WILD.zw) 2011 Abridged Report

first_imgWilldale Limited (WILD.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange under the Building & Associated sector has released it’s 2011 abridged results.For more information about Willdale Limited (WILD.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Willdale Limited (WILD.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Willdale Limited (WILD.zw)  2011 abridged results.Company ProfileWilldale Limited manufactures and markets a range of clay brick products for the Zimbabwe building and construction sector. Its clay brick range includes face brick, semi-face brick, common brick and paving bricks for walkways, patios, swimming pool surrounds and garden landscaping. The bricks are either manufactured with a rustic, smooth or brushed finish. Willdale Limited has a range which includes economy plaster, special ground solutions and decorative building products which include window sills, faggots and klompies. The company was listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange in 2003 after a demerger from Mashonaland Holdings Limited and is the only brick company listed on the ZSE. Willdale Limited is listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Associated Commercial Company Limited (ACC.mu) Q32017 Interim Report

first_imgAssociated Commercial Company Limited (ACC.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Transport sector has released it’s 2017 interim results for the third quarter.For more information about Associated Commercial Company Limited (ACC.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Associated Commercial Company Limited (ACC.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Associated Commercial Company Limited (ACC.mu)  2017 interim results for the third quarter.Company ProfileAssociated Commercial Company Limited specialises in motor vehicles, motor spares and accessories. Headquartered in in Port Louis, Mauritius, the company imports, markets, sells and offers motor vehicle services that include repairs and the sale of motor spares. Associated Commercial Company Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius.last_img read more

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Long-term injury: David Denton deals with life after rugby

first_img Long-term injury: David Denton deals with life after rugbyDavid Denton retired from rugby in September after almost 14 months on the sidelines dealing with debilitating concussion. Today he is positive about the future and appreciative of the support he received at Leicester Tigers. But after calling time on his career then, the recovery goes on.“Other than golf, I’ve probably done three days’ exercise in nine months,” the 42-cap Scotland back-row reveals at the end of November. “It’s really, really tough. And that’s all in the last few weeks. I’m slowly trying to get back into exercise now because the last bit of getting rid of the last symptoms is going to come from doing exercise.“But I need to get the balance right. Because if I go too hard I’m going to be straight back to square one and then I’m gonna have to wait another month or two before I can start easing back into it again.”It’s not quite as bad as fearing a short run for the bus or picking up his baby, but there are shadows from his past life that can make you flinch.Abrasive: Taking the ball up against Sale Sharks (Getty Images)He explains: “I haven’t watched a huge amount of rugby in the last however long but when I’ve been watching rugby matches I’m like, ‘oh my God’. I can’t fathom running into a group of bodies and, yeah, having a massive collision. I just can’t fathom that.“A short burst of exercise isn’t gonna floor me but it’s like I said, if I try to go too fast… I’m slowly doing what I’m doing. I’m actually swimming. So if I jumped into a pool and tried to swim a (kilometre) straight off the bat, I’d be pretty f***** up for a couple of days, I’d say.”Clearly the Zimbabwe-born bruiser would love to have hung up the boots at a time of his choosing. At 29 then, he should have been bashing tacklers in that all-too-familiar Denton style. Having joined Leicester following stints with Worcester and Bath after a move south from Edinburgh, he put together six games for them and wanted to give fans something to appreciate.Life does not always work like that. He tells Rugby World that for the year leading up to the big decision, he had gone to bed every night with a headache. As the days went on he would get worse and it exacted a psychological toll – “The idea of getting back on the field was weighing me down,” he says.Flying high: Winning a lineout for Scotland, 2018 (Getty Images)In the current issue of Rugby World magazine, Henry Trinder talks us through his comeback from a ruptured Achilles. In the piece, the Gloucester centre talks of hunting down small goals. Reflecting on this, Denton reveals that one of the most frustrating elements of his time out with concussion was that for eight months he saw no change in his condition. From the day it happened, he says, until just over a month before today, there was very little change.Related: Rugby World magazine’s all-stars editionAfter a scattering of tests and consultations over the near-14 months with six or seven specialists, by the time he went to the same London specialist’s office he’d visited over and over for the last year to get the final news – the Leicester physios even asked the night before if the back-rower wanted family with him – there was a scintilla of relief. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “It wasn’t a big emotive moment for me, mate,” Denton adds. “It was just a point of putting a full-stop on it. Because I already knew what was going to be said. I remember feeling a bit funny about (the meeting) the night before. I knew this thing that had been lingering over me was finally about to happen, but when it did it wasn’t a big draining moment.”Since his retirement, Tigers have continued to help him out. Their extended network of influential figures has come to the fore. Not to give him a job but to chat through his options, how they can help, offering advice.During his time out, Denton deferred an MBA at Warwick’s business school twice, before eventually abandoning it. He has moved back to Edinburgh with his young family, but he believes his skill-set can help him fit into the business world and it is likely his search for a new vocation will lead him to London.After his convalescence and time spent with family back in Africa, he is looking ahead with a sense of renewed vigour. The new diet might help too.“I was a professional athlete for ten years and my diet’s never been as healthy as it is now because back then I just got away with it,” he laughs. “My genetic make-up just meant that whatever I ate was converted straight into energy. It was fantastic and I pretty much ate what I wanted, whereas now I can’t.Capital gains: Carrying for Edinburgh in 2015 (Getty Images)“This is not a problem I’ve ever had before but for some reason sugar sends me (into a bad state). So my diet’s improved massively. That includes things like white carbs because they spike my glucose levels. So I have to keep an eye on that now.“It’s not about aesthetics. That’s not why I’m dieting. I’m dieting because I want to feel normal.”For those who saw him dig in on the field, it will come as no surprise that he wants to get going on a new route as soon as he is ready for it. “I genuinely feel really positive about that,” he says, before adding: “I’ve also been incredibly humbled by how great the rugby network has been for me since I’ve retired.”Dealing with long-term injury can be a frustrating and lonely place. Transitioning out of the game is also something many want to understand more. For Denton, he is keen to impress on people how he can contribute to any new workplace straightaway. That’s the next big step in recovery. The former Scotland back-rower retired from the game in September following a lengthy lay-off with concussioncenter_img Looking ahead: David Denton in his last playing season, with Leicester Tigers (Getty Images) To read our long-read on long-term injury, check out the new issue of Rugby World.Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.last_img read more

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Korean Anglicans celebrate 125 years of mission, ministry

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Dorothy Rogers says: Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Asia, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments are closed. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem October 7, 2015 at 9:14 pm This was amazing, I would love to see and hear the whole service.I am an Anglican and I live in Canada in a town called Timmins in the province of Ontario, in the Northern part of our beautiful Province.Congratulations on 125 years of Ministry. Gods’ Peace and Love to you all. Dorothy Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ethnic Ministries Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Anglican Communion, [Episcopal News Service – Seoul, South Korea] Korean Anglicans welcomed friends from across the communion Oct. 3 as they celebrated 125 years of ministry based in inculturation, mission and evangelism.The festive Eucharist at the Cathedral of St. Mary and St. Nicholas in downtown Seoul drew an overflow crowd. Many people sat on blue stools in the courtyards outside Romanesque church watching the proceedings on three enormous video screens. Many wore blue paper visors that were handed out with the order of service booklets to shield themselves from a warm October sun.An overflow crowd listens to Seoul Archbishop Paul Keun Sang Kim, who is also the primate of the Anglican Church in Korea, preach Oct. 3 during the province’s 125th anniversary celebration Eucharist Oct. 3 at the Cathedral of St. Mary and St. Nicholas in downtown Seoul. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceA street fair of sorts lined one side of the lower courtyard. The cathedral’s Café Grace coffee shop under a large tree in that courtyard was open for business. The café is a mission of the cathedral that helps women refugees from North Korean get settled into society in the South. Communion was served to those sitting outside.Inside the cathedral, bishops from across Asia and other parts of the communion, including The Episcopal Church joined the service, as did Korean clergy. The celebration took place during Episcopal Asiamerica Ministries international consultation that began here Sept. 30. Participants were among the hundreds of worshippers.Those worshippers  sang traditional Anglican hymns in Korean as well as modern compositions. The music included folk instruments played by Koreans in traditional dress. The service was broadcast to those outside by CBS, a non-profit television station that features programming related to the Korean church and society. Cameramen on foot and with a crane caught different angles of every element of the two-and-a-half-hour service.The Anglican Church of Korea traces its roots to Sept. 29, 1890 when Bishop Charles John Corfe, who had been ordained a bishop at Westminster Abbey, arrived with other colleagues at Incheon Port. Corfe began his work in the Seoul area, opening schools and medical facilities and other institutions such as orphanages. The church now has three dioceses, more than 200 priests, Sungkonghoe University, four religious communities and 60 social welfare centers. It has grown to more than 65,000 members in 120 parishes and missions.Seoul Archbishop and Anglican Church in Korea Primate Paul Keun Sang Kim prays the Eucharistic prayer during the province’s 125th anniversary celebration Eucharist Oct. 3 at the Cathedral of St. Mary and St. Nicholas in downtown Seoul. He is surrounded by bishops from across the Anglican Communion, including Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, second from left, and others from The Episcopal Church. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceFrom the beginning, Anglicans worked for the church to be integrated into Korean culture. Thus, while the Romanesque cathedral’s apse is filled with a golden mosaic crowned by an image of Christ, there are church buildings elsewhere that were constructed in the traditional Korean architecture.Before the anniversary service started, the bishops joined Seoul Archbishop Paul Keun Sang Kim, who is also the primate of the Anglican Church in Korea, to dedicate a bust of the Rev. Mark Hee-Jun Kim, the Anglican Church in Korea’s first Korean priest. He was ordained on Dec. 21, 1915 by Bishop Mark N. Trollope, who later oversaw construction of the cathedral.Christopher Chan-Young Kim, a descendant of the Rev. Mark Hee-Jun Kim, the Anglican Church in Korea’s first Korean priest, reads the first lesson during the province’s 125th anniversary celebration Eucharist Oct. 3 at the Cathedral of St. Mary and St. Nicholas in downtown Seoul. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceChristopher Chan-Young Kim, a young boy descended from the priest, read the Old Testament reading in Korean during the service. The reading, Isaiah 6:3-9, formed the theme of the service as Isaiah offered to preach God’s word, saying “Here I am; send me.”This year marks 50 years since Korean bishops have led the Korean Anglican Church. Lee Cheon Hwan was ordained and consecrated in 1965, just 20 years after the country was liberated from Japan after World War II. The church became an independent province of the Anglican Communion in 1993. Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby sent anniversary greetings to the province that were read during the service by Church of England Diocese of Peterborough Bishop Donald Allister. Peterborough and the Diocese of Seoul have had a relationship since 2011.Reconciliation is a theme for the province’s ministry and the anniversary Eucharist’s collect included a prayer that Korean Anglicans would “devote ourselves to the unification and reconciliation of the Korean peninsula.”The service also featured a Korean-specific prayer for each of the Anglican Communion’s Five Mark’s of Mission. The prayer for the fourth mark (to transform unjust structures of society, to challenge violence of every kind and pursue peace and reconciliation) noted the sorrow of the peninsula’s division.“Seventy years of our independence is also 70 years of our division,” the prayer said, noting that wounds from World War II “turned into ideological conflict” and “families lost their hometowns.“We pray that our nation will become one, dance in an embrace, and worship and praise you even in North Korea,” the prayer concluded.The Anglican Church in Korea has also pursued reconciliation with the Nippon Sei Ko Kai (the Anglican Church in Japan). Japan’s annexation of Korea in 1910 was the start of a militaristic period in that country’s history that only ended with its defeat in World War II. Korean men and women were conscripted as laborers in Japan, suffered from and often died because of their working conditions. The Anglican Church in Japan did not protest as Japan began to occupy and colonize other Asian countries.Last December the two churches celebrated 30 years of mission partnership.Archbishop Nathaniel Makoto Uematsu, the NSKK primate who has attended the EAM gathering in Seoul, told that group that Korean Anglicans “opened their hearts to us even before Japan had come to terms with and apologised for its role in the colonization of the Korean peninsula.” He said they “drew our attention to the inadequacies and errors of Japan’s historical awareness, they also opened the door to exchanges between individuals, churches, dioceses and at the provincial level.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Korean Anglicans celebrate 125 years of mission, ministry Eucharist combines Korean and Anglican traditions to mark anniversary Press Release Service Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events Comments (1) By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 3, 2015 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

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Episcopalians invoke values in range of anti-hunger efforts, from soup…

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Pierre Whalon says: November 2, 2017 at 2:41 am Across Europe, the churches of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, great and small, all have programs to address hunger: food banks, meals for homeless, and so on.— Their proud Bishop Comments are closed. Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Poverty & Hunger By David PaulsenPosted Oct 31, 2017 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Food and Faith, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR center_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Comments (1) Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Guests and volunteers pray together during one of the free breakfasts offered by St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Seattle, one of range of anti-hunger ministries involving the Episcopal Church at all levels. Photo: Sara Bates/St. Luke’s[Episcopal News Service] In Christianity, food is inseparable from faith. It underlies a wide spectrum of the Bible’s teachings and Christian traditions, from individual fasting to Jesus’ Last Supper and the celebration of the Eucharist. The faith journey is a path from hunger to fullness.“Blessed are you who are hungry now, for you will be filled,” Jesus says in Luke 6:21.But Jesus’ followers also were called to give to the poor, providing physical food along with Jesus’ spiritual food. Defining that mission, let alone fulfilling it, can be difficult, and churches and believers have wrestled since Jesus’ time with the question of how best to address the problem of hunger. Today, physical hunger remains a persistent scourge around the world, including in countries of great wealth like the United States.‘Food and Faith’Episcopal News Service kicks off a five-part series on anti-hunger efforts in the Episcopal Church. Future stories will focus on food pantries, a soup kitchen, a food truck and the church’s advocacy on government programs that fight hunger. Part 2 will post Nov. 6.Hope remains, too. Episcopal News Service found it in a homeless outreach program in Seattle, Washington, in a food truck ministry in Houston, Texas, and in a New York City soup kitchen. Those and other examples of faith-based solutions to the problem of hunger form the heart of the “Food and Faith” series this November, in which ENS tells the stories of various anti-hunger efforts underway in all corners of the Episcopal Church.The need is well documented. More than 41.2 million Americans and 12 percent of households are deemed food insecure because they lack access to enough food to maintain active and healthy lives, according to Feeding America’s most recent “Poverty and Hunger Fact Sheet.” And hunger is not solely a problem of poverty. More than half of all food-insecure Americans live in households above the poverty line.Nor is hunger a sudden emergency for many households. It can be an unforgiving, intractable fact of daily life.“For a lot of people that live below or close to the poverty line, they’re left wondering where their next meal is going to come from,” said Catherine Davis, chief marketing and communication officer for Feeding America, which distributes food through its member food banks to faith-based and secular food pantries across the country.The Episcopal Church emphasizes anti-hunger efforts at all levels. Congregations everywhere operate food pantries and meal ministries to assist the needy, one canned good or bowl of soup at a time. There’s Grace Food Pantry in Madison, Wisconsin, distributing food to needy guests for 38 years. There’s Abundant Harvest, a relatively new Episcopal food truck ministry in the Houston area that is part of a congregation aimed at finding communion around the dinner table.Volunteers Clare Manthey and John Mitchell prepare to serve St. Luke’s Episcopal Church’s daily free breakfast through the Edible Hope Kitchen ministry. Photo: Sara Bates/St. Luke’sFor ministries like these, the goal is to do more than put food in needy mouths.“It’s a witness to our community and our neighborhood of what it means to live a Christian life,” said Sara Bates, coordinator of the Edible Hope Kitchen at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Seattle, which serves free breakfast every weekday to hundreds of homeless residents in its Ballard neighborhood.The fight against hunger isn’t just local. Money donated to Episcopal Relief & Development supports programs fighting famine overseas in places like South Sudan. Churchwide advocacy campaigns seek to influence U.S. policy on hunger relief in ways that reflect Christian values through the Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations.In May, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry joined “For Such a Time as This,” an ecumenical campaign of prayer, advocacy and fasting, timed to the 21st of each month during the current Congress to highlight the difference government programs like Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, also known as SNAP or food stamps, can make in the lives of people struggling with hunger.Curry told Episcopal News Service the church was following in Jesus’ footsteps by feeding both the body and soul.“Jesus fed 5,000 people with physical, tangible bread because they were hungry.  At the same time, he fed their souls by teaching them the Gospel way,” Curry said. “Sacraments, the word of God, worship, bible study, prayer groups, feed the soul. Soup kitchens, food pantries, ecumenical and interfaith food shuttles, community gardens, feed the body. In these ways, we seek to end hunger … hunger of the body and hunger of the soul.”Biblical roots for feeding ministriesJesus also alludes to this duality in the Beatitudes: “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled,” he says in Matthew 5:1-12.The Greek word for righteousness was the same as the word for justice, noted the Rev. Jane Patterson, associate professor of the New Testament at Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas. How the ancient world understood hunger and fasting, though, was different from how we understand it today.“Most people in the ancient world were hungry most of the time,” Patterson told ENS, and the prophets made the moral case for feeding the hungry.The idea of Jesus as the “good shepherd” has roots in Ezekiel 34, Patterson said. God asks the shepherds why they feed themselves but don’t care for the flock. God pledges to tend to his sheep, the Israelites, and “provide for them a land renowned for its crops, and they will no longer be victims of famine in the land or bear the scorn of the nations.”References to abundance and scarcity continue through the New Testament. The words “hunger” and “hungry” are found 19 times in the Gospels. “Eat” appears several dozen more times. In Mark 11:12-14, Jesus is hungry but finds no figs on the fig tree, so he condemns the tree to wither. The prodigal son in Luke 15 is so hungry he covets the pigs’ food, “but no one gave him anything.” And in Matthew 6:25, Jesus says, “do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink. … Is not life more than food?”For the disciples, Jesus shared his Last Supper in a time of uncertainty and with a great injustice about to happen, Patterson said. It is recounted today before every Eucharist because of how Jesus joined the meal to his coming sacrifice, offering himself as bread and wine.“Food is so basic to life,” Patterson said, but spiritual needs are just as essential. There often is little distinction between the two in the Bible. “People who are hungry need real food, and they also need spiritual sustenance.”One of the best-known gospel stories involving food is the one cited by Curry, the feeding of the 5,000 with just five loaves of bread and two fish, as recounted in all four gospels. That miracle is followed by Jesus’ teaching about “the bread of life.”“Whoever comes to me will never go hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty,” he says in John 6:35.Jesus’ disciples “needed to be taught as much as they needed the bread,” Patterson said. She also emphasizes the communal nature of the miracle. Jesus is not said to have multiplied the loaves and fish. The miracle is that all who gathered are fed from what little food was available, and no one lacks food for giving to those in need.“In God’s economy, it’s never zero sum,” she said.Giving much, lacking nothingThe Rev. Melanie Mullen, the Episcopal Church’s director of reconciliation, justice and creation care, looks to Proverbs 28 for inspiration in the fight against hunger: “Whoever gives to the poor will lack nothing.”Mullen oversees Jubilee Ministries and the United Thank Offering, two programs in which the Episcopal Church provides substantial financial support for antipoverty efforts. Jubilee Ministries focuses specifically on poverty through its network of 600 Jubilee Centers, which provide a range of services, including food, shelter and health care.United Thank Offering, or UTO, collects donations from individuals across the Episcopal Church and distributes the money to a wide variety of worthy ministries, many of them feeding ministries.More than $1.2 million in UTO grants was awarded this year. Recipients included a farm run by the Diocese of Ohio, a church garden in Connecticut and food ministries in central California. Food ministries regularly benefit from UTO grants, such as the $12,500 given in 2016 to support this garden at St. James Episcopal Church in Kent, Washington.The Episcopal Church can lead from a position of moral clarity based on Jesus’ teachings, Mullen said.“When we help the poor we’re not just doing charity work, we’re living as Jesus did,” she said.The Episcopal Church, through the Anglican Communion, also can leverage a worldwide network of believers willing to give their money to support strangers who need help putting meals on the table. Episcopal Relief & Development plays a leading role in those efforts on behalf of the Episcopal Church.Alleviating hunger is a core area of Episcopal Relief & Development’s work, with an emphasis on community-based programs. “These locally developed programs address the specific context of hunger and have a wider impact on the health and economic well-being of the community,” the agency’s website says. “Working with church partners and local organizations, we empower people to live healthier and more productive lives.”Episcopal Relief & Development was able to spend $6.9 million on food security in 2015 and nearly $4 million in 2016, according to the agency’s annual reports, with help from Episcopalians who have been financially generous through the years.There also are seemingly limitless examples of Episcopalians working in their own communities to help next-door neighbors put food on the table.The food ministry at St. Luke’s in Seattle started about 30 years ago as a weekly community lunch, the labor of love of the church’s Bible study group. More recently, it also has helped save the congregation, which was struggling after a major split over gay ordination.In 2011, the church lost an estimated 80 percent of its members in the split, leaving attendance at worship services as low as a dozen people some Sundays, Bates said. Among those who stayed were the older women who hosted the church’s food ministry, and they were determined to keep it going.St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Seattle, Washington, where a daily free breakfast is served to hundreds of people each week, has seen a rise in homelessness in its Ballard neighborhood. Photo: Sara Bates/St. Luke’sBy that time, the meal had become a breakfast served five days a week, as the group noticed more and more homeless people in the neighborhood but with no feeding programs in the morning. As the meals became more and more popular, they took on the name Edible Hope Kitchen a couple years ago, based on the suggestion of one of their regular guests.“He said, ‘You guys don’t just serve food here. You serve edible hope,’” Bates recalled.She began working at the church as an intern in 2015, soon after a new vicar arrived and began injecting new life into the congregation. Bates, 33, now works 20 hours a week as the church’s paid coordinator of Edible Hope Kitchen, partly thanks to the $22,000 UTO grant St. Luke’s received this year.St. Luke’s gets most of its food from donations or at a reduced cost from the Feeding America-affiliated food bank in Seattle. The UTO grant will also help the church upgrade equipment in its kitchen. Buying a new bread slicer, for example, is a big improvement because Edible Hope offers unlimited slices of toast from loaves that often are not precut.The goal is to be able to feed up to 250 people from 7 to 10 a.m. each weekday by this winter. That means a lot of toast. The church also goes through at least six dozen eggs a day, sometimes as many as 14 dozen. Four to 10 volunteers prep the meals the night before, and about a dozen people help each morning by setting up the meal, serving it and then cleaning up.“Honestly, it shouldn’t be possible to do all that we do with what we have. It’s truly miraculous,” Bates said.The meals have helped connect two groups in the neighborhood – the homeless and the affluent – that otherwise may find little reason to interact. Bates also thinks the food ministry is one of the reasons new people are finding the congregation and becoming members, especially young people and families. Edible Hope Kitchen offers a way for them to be active in their faith, she said, noting that Sunday attendance at St. Luke’s now is sometimes as high as 80 people.“It’s not always convenient to have 200 homeless people on our property. It’s not always clean and comfortable, and yet we want to be a place where all of our neighbors feel welcome and comfortable,” Bates said. “We feel very, very called to feed our hungry neighbors.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopalians invoke values in range of anti-hunger efforts, from soup kitchens to global aid Food and Faith: ENS kicks off series on fight against hunger Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Servicelast_img read more

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Justice for Terence Crutcher: Tulsa killer cop’s indictment not enough

first_imgTerence CrutcherHardly a day goes by without a new name added to the horrific roll of people of color cut down by police bullets in the United States. It is no wonder that the Black Lives Matter movement has sprung up in these dangerous times to embody the spirit of resistance that beats in the hearts of millions, who are pained and outraged, again and again, not only by the police murders but because the so-called “justice system” abets and indeed encourages this reign of terror.Under these circumstances, even a minimal charge against the uniformed perpetrator gets counted as a small victory for the protesters, at least by the corporate media. As for the grieving families and friends of those gunned down, they are not so easily satisfied and continue to demand justice.The fatal shooting of Terence Crutcher by a cop in the city of Tulsa, Okla., on Sept. 16 is a case in point. Crutcher, 40, was a student at Tulsa Community College and had enrolled to begin a music appreciation course on the day he was shot by officer Betty Jo Shelby.At first, the police story was that Crutcher had a gun and the officer felt her life was threatened. But immediately people took to the streets demanding that police release their videotapes of the shooting. The vigils were peaceful and clergy-led, but the authorities knew it might not stay that way if nothing was done.Within two days the video of his death was released to Crutcher’s family, who viewed it together with Black pastors and elected officials. It was excruciatingly unambiguous. Crutcher had been shot down in cold blood.Cop walks free after being chargedOn Sept. 22, prosecutors indicted officer Shelby — on a charge of first-degree felony manslaughter. The cop was released immediately on a $50,000 bond after being in custody for only 20 minutes, according to court records.The prosecutors’ documents confirm that Crutcher was unarmed, had his hands in the air and was walking away from Shelby when she shot and killed him. (New York Times, Sept. 24)Demonstrators cheered at the indictment. The attorney for Crutcher’s family, Damario Solomon-Simmons, said, “We are happy that charges were brought, but let me be clear — the family wants and deserves full justice.“Not only for this family, not only for Terence, but to be a deterrent for law officers all around this nation to know that you cannot kill unarmed citizens.”More rallies are planned in Tulsa — both by the Black community, who want justice, and by the police, who are treating the indictment as though the killer cop were the victim in this case. Shelby’s spouse, also a cop, was present in a helicopter above the scene when she gunned down Crutcher.Oil-rich Tulsa was the scene in 1921 of a racist assault on what was then a well-to-do Black community that left 300 residents dead and the whites in control of all the wealth. The job of the police is not to protect the people — if so, why shoot them? — but to perpetuate the status quo that works for the super-rich.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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TCU News Now 4/17/20

first_imgprintThis week on TCU News Now: how Texas Gov. Greg Abbott plans to re-open the state; an easy way to make your own face coverings at home; and how people all over the U.S. are helping our frontline workers. NewsNow Staffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/newsnow-staff/ World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution ReddIt Linkedin Facebook TCU News Now 11/4/2020 TCU News Now 10/28/2020 Previous articleHoroscope: April 17, 2020Next articleHow COVID-19 is affecting weddings NewsNow Staff RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter + posts NewsNow Staff NewsNow Staffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/newsnow-staff/center_img NewsNow Staffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/newsnow-staff/ ReddIt Facebook TCU News Now 11/11/2020 TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Linkedin Twitter NewsNow Staffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/newsnow-staff/ Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Logo for News Now broadcast TCU News Now 10/21/2020last_img read more

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Lauinger Double-Doubles in Debut at West Coast Baptist

first_imgSports Lauinger Double-Doubles in Debut at West Coast Baptist From GoCaltech.com Published on Wednesday, September 7, 2016 | 11:39 am More Cool Stuff Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Business News Top of the News Make a comment First Heatwave Expected Next Week Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Herbeauty10 Of The Most Notorious Female Spies In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyVictoria’s Secret Model’s Tips For Looking Ultra SexyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAre You His Ms. Right? 12 Signs He Thinks You AreHerbeautyHerbeauty Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday center_img EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Freshman Alexa Lauinger (Ortonville, Mich. / Brandon) posted a double-double in her collegiate debut as the Caltech volleyball team opened its season with a first set victory before ultimately falling, 3-1, at West Coast Baptist College on Tuesday night.Lauinger led the team with 12 kills and racked up a whopping 20 digs in a brilliant debut performance. As a team, Caltech showed a degree of consistency in attack, smacking eight kills in each set, but struggled on defense, surrendering 14 more kills and 12 service aces to the Eagles in front of a raucous home crowd.Freshman Lauren Li (Bellaire, Texas / Bellaire) started the season as well as possible, serving up an ace for the first point as Caltech built up an 8-5 lead. The hosts rode a 12-6 run to flip that margin, but the Beavers recovered thanks in part to back-to-back aces by freshman Mei-Ling Laures (Chicago, Ill. / British Int’l School of Chicago), eventually taking the lead at 20-19 and winning five of the next six points to claim the 25-21 victory and 1-0 match lead.A trio of Eagles errors to start the second set handed Caltech a 4-0 lead, but WCBC ran off 12 of the next 13 points to surge ahead, 12-5. Caltech could only put together as many as three points once, which came behind consecutive aces from Li, before falling, 25-21.A slow start to the third set saw WCBC move ahead 4-1, but this time it was the Beavers’ turn to rattle off four straight points for the 5-4 edge. WCBC had a response soon after, however, notching another six straight and later posting five unanswered to claim a 25-19 win and take a 2-1 lead in the match.The hosts put Caltech in a huge 13-5 hole to open the fourth set, but the Beavers refused to cave despite their youth. With Lauinger serving, Caltech made a stand with six straight points to pull back within one and, after falling back behind by four, rattled off another four consecutive on Li’s serve to tie the set at 20-20. A bad set and reception error helped WCBC to reach match point at 24-21, which the Beavers survived twice before finally succumbing, 25-23.Sophomore Sakthi Vetrivel (Redmond, Wash. / Overlake School) also reached double figures with 10 kills and added two blocks, while rookie Ellie Walker (Minneapolis, Minn. / Blake School) paced the squad with a .333 hitting percentage behind four kills without a single attacking error. Walker combined with Laures to record 26 assists while Li notched 12 digs and a team-best five aces. Freshman Julia Fay (Oakland, Calif. / College Prep. School) also posted her first career kill in the match.Head Coach Tom Gardner and the Beavers return to Lancaster on Saturday, Sept. 10 for a doubleheader at the University of Antelope Valley (1-3). faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Community News Subscribelast_img read more

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‘Alligator Days’ book launch

first_imgTwitter Print Linkedin WhatsApp Advertisement Previous articleLimerick gang linked to attack on business man’s home by Dublin criminalsNext articleJudge refuses jurisdiction in case of theft of cameras Guest Writerhttp://www.limerickpost.iecenter_img NewsBreaking news‘Alligator Days’ book launchBy Guest Writer – November 22, 2013 675 Email FRED Johnston’s new poetry collection entitled ‘Alligator Days’ is to launch in the White House Bar on Wednesday December 27 at 9.00pm. Johnston is extremely fond of Limerick and often visits, this also is his ninth poetry collection.Fred Johnston was born in Belfast in 1951 he and in 1972 he received a Hennessy Literary Award for prose. He has eight collections of poetry, three novels and two volumes of short stories published already.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up He received the Prix de l’Ambassade in 2000 and has accepted several Arts Council bursaries. As well as that he has also received an Arts Council of Ireland literature bursary and one from the Arts Council of Northern Ireland.Johnston was the founder of Galway’s  international literature festival, CÚIRT, in 1986. He is keen on writing poetry in French and has been published in many France-based literary journals. Facebooklast_img read more

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